Publications

Export 4 results:
Sort by: [ Author  (Asc)] Title Type Year
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y [Z]   [Show ALL]
Z
Zaahkouk, A. M. S., M. T. Abdel Aziz, A. M. Rezq, H. M. Atta, H. H. Fouad, H. H. Ahmed, D. Sabry, and M. H. Yehia, "Efficacy of a novel water-soluble curcumin derivative versus sildenafil citrate in mediating erectile function", International journal of impotence research, vol. 27, issue 1, pp. 9-15, 2015.
Zayed, S. A., T. M. Gaafar, R. M. Samy, D. Sabry, A. S. Nasr, and F. A. Maksoud, "Production of endothelial progenitor cells obtained from human Wharton's jelly using different culture conditions.", Biotechnic & histochemistry : official publication of the Biological Stain Commission, vol. 91, issue 8, pp. 532-539, 2016 Nov. Abstract

Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) participate in revascularization and angiogenesis. EPC can be cultured in vitro from mononuclear cells of peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood or bone marrow; they also can be transdifferentiated from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We isolated EPCs from Wharton's jelly (WJ) using two methods. The first method was by obtaining MSC from WJ and characterizing them by flow cytometry and their adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation, then applying endothelial growth differentiating media. The second method was by direct culture of cells derived from WJ into endothelial differentiating media. EPCs were characterized by morphology, Dil-LDL uptake/UEA-1 immunostaining and testing the expression of endothelial markers by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. We found that MSC derived from WJ differentiated into endothelial-like cells using simple culture conditions with endothelium induction agents in the medium.

Zayed, A. A., R. M. Sobhi, R. M. S. El Aguizy, D. Sabry, and S. B. Mahmoud, "Sequential peeling as a monotherapy for treatment of milder forms of acne vulgaris.", Journal of cosmetic dermatology, vol. 19, issue 6, pp. 1381-1387, 2020. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Glycolic acid (GA) and salicylic acid (SA) peels have been used separately for acne treatment, not as a sequential peel.

AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sequential peeling with 70% GA and 20% SA as a monotherapy and as an adjuvant to systemic doxycycline in treatment of mild to moderate acne and the effect on serum interleukin (IL) 17 and tissue IL-1α.

PATIENTS/METHODS: Forty-five mild to moderate acne vulgaris patients were randomly assigned into three groups. Group [A] underwent sequential application of 70% GA followed by 20% SA biweekly for three months. Group [B] underwent sequential peeling and doxycycline PO100 mg BD for 1 month followed by 100 OD for 2 months. Group [C] received oral doxycycline. Acne grading, lesion counting, and patient satisfaction were assessed. Serum samples and perilesional skin biopsies were obtained at onset and 2 weeks after finishing the treatment for assessment of serum IL-17 and tissue IL-1α.

RESULTS: All groups showed statistically significant decrease in acne grading and lesion count, increase in patient satisfaction, and decrease in serum IL-17 and tissue IL-1 α after treatment. There was no significant difference between the 3 groups before or after treatment, except regarding patient satisfaction after treatment, which was significantly higher in groups [A] and [B] than group [C] (P = .001).

CONCLUSIONS: This study recommends using sequential GA 70% and SA 20% peels in the treatment of mild or moderate acne vulgaris as a new cost-effective mode, with low-down time and potential safety, in noncompliant patients on medical therapy.

Zayed, S. A., T. M. Gaafar, R. M. Samy, D. Sabry, A. S. Nasr, and F. A. Maksoud, "Production of endothelial progenitor cells obtained from human Wharton's jelly using different culture conditions.", Biotechnic & histochemistry : official publication of the Biological Stain Commission, vol. 91, issue 8, pp. 532-539, 2016 Nov. Abstract

Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) participate in revascularization and angiogenesis. EPC can be cultured in vitro from mononuclear cells of peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood or bone marrow; they also can be transdifferentiated from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We isolated EPCs from Wharton's jelly (WJ) using two methods. The first method was by obtaining MSC from WJ and characterizing them by flow cytometry and their adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation, then applying endothelial growth differentiating media. The second method was by direct culture of cells derived from WJ into endothelial differentiating media. EPCs were characterized by morphology, Dil-LDL uptake/UEA-1 immunostaining and testing the expression of endothelial markers by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. We found that MSC derived from WJ differentiated into endothelial-like cells using simple culture conditions with endothelium induction agents in the medium.

Tourism