Pushed monocanalicular intubation versus probing as a primary management for congenital nasolacrimal obstruction.

Citation:
Pushed monocanalicular intubation versus probing as a primary management for congenital nasolacrimal obstruction., Elsawaby, Emad Abdelaal, El Essawy Rania Assem, Abdelbaky Sameh Hassan, and Ismail Yomna Magdy , Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.), 2016, Volume 10, p.1487-93, (2016)

Abstract:

PURPOSE: Evaluation of efficiency, complications, and advantages of pushed monocanalicular intubation using Masterka(®) tube versus simple probing in patients with congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO).

PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a case-controlled study that included 60 eyes (of 53 patients); 30 eyes underwent probing and 30 eyes intubation using the Masterka tube as a primary treatment for CNLDO. The children were aged between 6 months and 36 months at the time of surgery, with no previous nasolacrimal surgical procedure, and had one or more of the following clinical signs of nasolacrimal duct obstruction: epiphora, mucous discharge, and/or increased tear lake.

RESULTS: We defined success by absence of epiphora, mucous discharge, or increased tear lake 1 month after tube removal. The overall success rate in the probing group was 80%, while it was 83.3% in the intubation group.

CONCLUSION: Pushed monocanalicular intubation is an effective method for treatment of CNLDO; it requires only mask inhalation anesthesia and could be considered as an appropriate alternative procedure with imperceptible complications.

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