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Saleem, S. N., and Z. Hawass, "Variability in Brain Treatment During Mummification of Royal Egyptians Dated to the 18th–20th Dynasties: MDCT Findings Correlated With the Archaeologic Literature", American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 200, issue 4, pp. W336-W344, 2013. Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to use MDCT to study brain treatment and removal (excerebration) as part of mummification of royal Egyptian mummies dated to the 18th to early 20th Dynasties and to correlate the imaging findings with the archaeologic literature.

MATERIALS AND METHODS. As part of an MDCT study of the Royal Ancient Egyptian Mummies Project, we analyzed CT images of the heads of 12 mummies dated to circa 1493–1156 BC (18th to early 20th Dynasties). We reconstructed and analyzed CT images for the presence of cranial defects, brain remnants, intracranial embalming materials, and nasal packs. We compared the CT findings of mummies dated to the 18th Dynasty with those dated to the 19th to early 20th Dynasties.

RESULTS. The Akhenaten mummy was excluded because of extensive postmortem skull fractures. CT showed that no brain treatment was offered to three mummies (Thutmose I, II, and III) who dated to the early 18th Dynasty and was offered to the eight mummies who dated later. The route of excerebration was transnasal in eight mummies; an additional suspected route was via a parietal defect. CT showed variable appearances of the intracranial contents. There were larger volumes of cranial packs and more variability in the appearances of the cranial packs in the royal mummies dated to the 19th to 20th Dynasties than in those dated to the 18th Dynasty.

CONCLUSION. MDCT shows variations in brain treatment during mummification of royal Egyptian mummies (18th–20th Dynasties). This study sets a template for future CT studies of the heads of ancient Egyptian mummies and focuses on the key elements of cranial mummification in this ancient era.

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Saleem, S. N., and Z. Hawass, "Subcutaneous packing in Royal Egyptian mummies dated from 18th to 20th Dynasties", J Comput Assist Tomogr , vol. 39, issue 3, pp. 301-306, 2015.
Saleem, S., A. I. Belal, and N. M. El-Ghandour, "Spinal cord schistosomiasis: MR imaging appearance with surgical and pathologic correlation", American journal of neuroradiology, vol. 26, no. 7: Am Soc Neuroradiology, pp. 1646–1654, 2005. Abstract
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Hawass, Z., and S. N. Saleem, Scanning the pharaohs: CT imaging of the New Kingdom Royal Mummies, , New York, AUC Press, 2016.
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Saleem, S. N., and M. S. Zaki, "Role of MR imaging in prenatal diagnosis of pregnancies at risk for Joubert syndrome and related cerebellar disorders", American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 31, no. 3: Am Soc Neuroradiology, pp. 424–429, 2010. Abstract
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Saleem, S. N., and M. S. Zaki, "Role of MR imaging in prenatal diagnosis of pregnancies at risk for Joubert syndrome and related cerebellar disorders", American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 31, no. 3: Am Soc Neuroradiology, pp. 424–429, 2010. Abstract
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Hawass, Z., S. Ismail, A. Selim, S. N. Saleem, and D. Fathalla, "Revisiting the harem conspiracy and death of Ramesses III: anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study", BMJ: British Medical Journal, vol. 345, 2012. Abstract

Objective To investigate the true character of the harem conspiracy described in the Judicial Papyrus of Turin and determine whether Ramesses III was indeed killed.

Design Anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study of the mummies of Ramesses III and unknown man E, found together and taken from the 20th dynasty of ancient Egypt (circa 1190-1070 BC).

Results Computed tomography scans revealed a deep cut in Ramesses III’s throat, probably made by a sharp knife. During the mummification process, a Horus eye amulet was inserted in the wound for healing purposes, and the neck was covered by a collar of thick linen layers. Forensic examination of unknown man E showed compressed skin folds around his neck and a thoracic inflation. Unknown man E also had an unusual mummification procedure. According to genetic analyses, both mummies had identical haplotypes of the Y chromosome and a common male lineage.

Conclusions This study suggests that Ramesses III was murdered during the harem conspiracy by the cutting of his throat. Unknown man E is a possible candidate as Ramesses III’s son Pentawere.

Hawass, Z., S. Ismail, A. Selim, S. N. Saleem, D. Fathalla, S. Wasef, A. Z. Gad, R. Saad, S. Fares, H. Amer, et al., "Revisiting the harem conspiracy and death of Ramesses III: anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study", BMJ: British Medical Journal, vol. 345: BMJ, 2012. Abstract
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Saleem, S. N., Y. Y. Sabri, and A. S. Saeed, "Radiology Education in the Faculty of Medicine at Cairo University", Radiology Education: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Springer Verlag, pp. 283, 2009. Abstract
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Saleem, S. N., Y. Y. Sabri, and A. S. Saeed, "Radiology Education in the Faculty of Medicine at Cairo University", Radiology Education: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Springer, pp. 283, 2008. Abstract
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Ghada MH Abdel‐Salam, Mohamed S Abdel‐Hamid, S. S. M. K. H. A. M. I. L. E. H. K. M. N. K. F., "Profound microcephaly, primordial dwarfism with developmental brain malformations: A new syndrome", American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, vol. 158A, issue 8, pp. 1823-1831, 2012. AbstractCU-PDF

We describe two sibs with a lethal form of profound congenital microcephaly, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, subtle skeletal changes, and poorly developed brain. The sibs had striking absent cranial vault with sloping of the forehead, large beaked nose, relatively large ears, and mandibular microretrognathia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed extremely simplified gyral pattern, large interhemispheric cyst and agenesis of corpus callosum, abnormally shaped hippocampus, and proportionately affected cerebellum and brainstem. In addition, fundus examination showed foveal
hypoplasia with optic nerve atrophy. No abnormalities of the internal organs were found. This profound formof microcephaly was identified at 17 weeks gestation by ultrasound and fetal brain MRI helped in characterizing the developmental brain malformations in the second sib. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such asRNU4ATAC,SLC25A19, and ASPM. These clinical and imaging findings are unlike that of any recognized severe forms of microcephaly which is believed to
be a new microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) with developmental brain malformations with most probably autosomal recessive inheritance based on consanguinity and similarly affected male and female sibs.

Abdel-Salam, G. M. H., M. S. Abdel-Hamid, S. N. Saleem, M. K. H. Ahmed, M. Issa, L. K. Effat, H. F. Kayed, M. S. Zaki, and K. R. Gaber, "Profound microcephaly, primordial dwarfism with developmental brain malformations: A new syndrome", American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A: Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company, 2012. Abstract
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Saleem, S. N., M. S. Zaki, N. A. Soliman, and M. Momtaz, "Prenatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Molar Tooth Sign at 17 to 18 Weeks of Gestation in Two Fetuses at Risk for Joubert Syndrome and Related Cerebellar Disorders", Neuropediatrics, vol. 42, no. 1: Thieme, pp. 35–38, 2011. Abstract
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Youssef, A., S. Zagonari, G. Salsi, S. N. Saleem, J. Krsmanovic, and G. Pacella, "Prenatal diagnosis of isolated butterfly vertebra", Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, vol. 44, issue 6, pp. 26-27, 2014.
RG, B., C. GJ, V. MD, S. SN, S. H-A, and P. - M. D, "A paleoimaging study of human mummies held in the Mother Church of Gangi, Sicily: Implications for mass casualty methodology", Forensic Imaging, vol. 23, pp. 200416, 2020.
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Zaki, M. S., G. M. H. Salam, S. N. Saleem, W. B. Dobyns, M. Y. Issa, S. Sattar, and J. G. Gleeson, "New recessive syndrome of microcephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, and congenital heart conduction defect", American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A: Wiley Online Library, 2011. Abstract
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Hawass, Z., and S. N. Saleem, "Mummified Daughters of King Tutankhamun: Archeologic and CT Studies", American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 197, no. 5: Am Roentgen Ray Soc, pp. W829–W836, 2011. Abstract
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Saleem, S. N., "MRI features of Neuro-Behcet disease", Neurographics, vol. 4, pp. 1–36, 2005. Abstract
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Saleem, S. N., "MR Imaging Diagnosis of Uterovaginal Anomalies: Current State of the Art1", Radiographics, vol. 23, no. 5: Radiological Society of North America, pp. e13–e13, 2003. Abstract
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Saleem, S. N., "MR Imaging Diagnosis of Uterovaginal Anomalies: Current State of the Art1", Radiographics, vol. 23, no. 5: Radiological Society of North America, pp. e13–e13, 2003. Abstract
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Zaki, M. S., A. Abdel-Aleem, G. Abdel-Salam, S. E. Marsh, J. L. Silhavy, A. J. Barkovich, M. E. Ross, S. N. Saleem, W. B. Dobyns, and J. G. Gleeson, "The molar tooth sign A new Joubert syndrome and related cerebellar disorders classification system tested in Egyptian families", Neurology, vol. 70, no. 7: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, pp. 556–565, 2008. Abstract

Joubert syndrome and related cerebellar disorders (JSRD) are a group of recessive congenital ataxia conditions usually showing neonatal hypotonia, dysregulated breathing rhythms, oculomotor apraxia, and mental retardation. The pathognomonic finding in JSRD is the unique molar tooth sign (MTS) on brain imaging. There is a tremendously broad spectrum of signs and symptoms mainly including kidney, retina, and liver disease, along with polydactyly and facial dysmorphisms. Here we propose a new diagnostic classification within JSRD that includes four major subtypes. To test this classification, we performed a systematic recruitment and genetic evaluation from a single referral center in Egypt. Thirteen families were identified, four showed evidence of linkage to one of the four known genetic loci, three showed novel AHI1 mutations, and nine were excluded from known loci. Each family could be classified into one of the four subtypes. This classification may thus be useful in the evaluation of patients with JSRD.

GLOSSARY: BUN = blood urinary nitrogen; COACH = cerebellar vermis hypo/aplasia-oligophrenia-ataxia-ocular coloboma-hepatic fibrosis; CORS = cerebello-oculo-renal syndrome; CVH = cerebellar vermis hypoplasia; DAS = Dekaban-Arima syndrome; DWM = Dandy-Walker malformation; JSRD = Joubert syndrome and related cerebellar disorders; LCA = Leber congenital amaurosis; lod = logarithm of odds score; MKS = Meckel-Gruber syndrome; MTS = molar tooth sign; NPH = nephronophthisis; NRC = National Research Center; OFD-VI = oro-facio-digital syndrome type VI; PCH = pontocerebellar hypoplasia; RHO = rhombencephalosynapsis; SLS = Senior-Loken syndrome.

Abdel-Salam, G. M. H., M. S. Zaki, S. N. Saleem, and K. R. Gaber, "Microcephaly, malformation of brain development and intracranial calcification in sibs: Pseudo-TORCH or a new syndrome", American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, vol. 146, no. 22: Wiley Online Library, pp. 2929–2936, 2008. Abstract
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SN, S., and S. YY, "Measuring competence of Radiology Education Programs and Residents: The Egyptian Experience", Radiology Education: The Evaluation and Assessment of Clinical Competence. , Berlin Heidelberg , Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg , 2012. AbstractCU-PDF

Ancient Egypt had an advanced elaborate medical education and practice ruled by a competent bureaucracy that apprenticed physicians to be practicing healers. In modern history, the Faculty of Medicine at Cairo University (Kasr Al-Ainy), established in 1827, continues the glory of Egypt in medical education as one of the biggest and oldest medical schools in Africa and the Middle East. Its central Radiology Department, with its total 77 radiologists, is responsible for clinical services as well as for providing multiple calibre radiology education programs for about 100 trainees annually from Egypt and neighbouring countries. Radiology education programs are planned for radiology residents to obtain master’s degree (M.Sc.), for assistant lecturers to obtain medical doctorate (M.D.) and for visitor trainees. Objectives of radiology education programs include knowledge, practical skills, intellectual capabilities and communications with medical societies and communities. Trainees are assessed to determine if learning objectives have been fulfilled on a daily, weekly and biannual basis. Radiology education programs are measured for professional performance through the university’s self-assessment studies; national assessment is measured through the National Authority for Quality Assurance and Accreditation in Education (NAQAAE), Egypt, and international assessment is measured through the World Federation for Medical Education (WFME).