Publications

Export 66 results:
Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year  (Desc)]
2012
Maha S Zaki, Sahar N Saleem, W. D. J. B. H. B. A. D. M. A. N. A. J. B. A. M., "Diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia: a novel recessive brain malformation", Brain, vol. 135, issue 8, pp. 2416-2427, 2012. Abstract

We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction with a characteristic ‘butterfly’-like contour of the midbrain on axial sections. Additional imaging features included variable degrees of supratentorial ventricular dilatation and hypoplasia to complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging showed diffuse hypomyelination and lack of an identifiable corticospinal tract. All patients displayed severe cognitive impairment, post-natal progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, spastic quadriparesis and seizures. Autistic features were noted in older cases. Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in two families. One of the patients required shunting for hydrocephalus; however, this yielded no change in ventricular size suggestive of dysplasia rather than obstruction. We propose the term ‘diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia’ to characterize this autosomal recessive malformation.

Zaki, M. S., S. N. Saleem, W. B. Dobyns, A. J. Barkovich, H. Bartsch, A. M. Dale, M. Ashtari, N. Akizu, J. G. Gleeson, and A. M. Grijalvo-Perez, "Diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia: a novel recessive brain malformation", Brain, vol. 135, no. 8: Oxford University Press, pp. 2416–2427, 2012. Abstract

We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction with a characteristic ‘butterfly’-like contour of the midbrain on axial sections. Additional imaging features included variable degrees of supratentorial ventricular dilatation and hypoplasia to complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging showed diffuse hypomyelination and lack of an identifiable corticospinal tract. All patients displayed severe cognitive impairment, post-natal progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, spastic quadriparesis and seizures. Autistic features were noted in older cases. Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in two families. One of the patients required shunting for hydrocephalus; however, this yielded no change in ventricular size suggestive of dysplasia rather than obstruction. We propose the term ‘diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia’ to characterize this autosomal recessive malformation.

SN, S., "Fetal Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR)", Echocardiography - New Techniques: InTech, 2012. CU-PDF
Saleem, S. N., "Fetal Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR)", Echocardiography-New, 2012. Abstract

n/a

SN, S., and S. YY, "Measuring competence of Radiology Education Programs and Residents: The Egyptian Experience", Radiology Education: The Evaluation and Assessment of Clinical Competence. , Berlin Heidelberg , Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg , 2012. AbstractCU-PDF

Ancient Egypt had an advanced elaborate medical education and practice ruled by a competent bureaucracy that apprenticed physicians to be practicing healers. In modern history, the Faculty of Medicine at Cairo University (Kasr Al-Ainy), established in 1827, continues the glory of Egypt in medical education as one of the biggest and oldest medical schools in Africa and the Middle East. Its central Radiology Department, with its total 77 radiologists, is responsible for clinical services as well as for providing multiple calibre radiology education programs for about 100 trainees annually from Egypt and neighbouring countries. Radiology education programs are planned for radiology residents to obtain master’s degree (M.Sc.), for assistant lecturers to obtain medical doctorate (M.D.) and for visitor trainees. Objectives of radiology education programs include knowledge, practical skills, intellectual capabilities and communications with medical societies and communities. Trainees are assessed to determine if learning objectives have been fulfilled on a daily, weekly and biannual basis. Radiology education programs are measured for professional performance through the university’s self-assessment studies; national assessment is measured through the National Authority for Quality Assurance and Accreditation in Education (NAQAAE), Egypt, and international assessment is measured through the World Federation for Medical Education (WFME).

Ghada MH Abdel‐Salam, Mohamed S Abdel‐Hamid, S. S. M. K. H. A. M. I. L. E. H. K. M. N. K. F., "Profound microcephaly, primordial dwarfism with developmental brain malformations: A new syndrome", American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, vol. 158A, issue 8, pp. 1823-1831, 2012. AbstractCU-PDF

We describe two sibs with a lethal form of profound congenital microcephaly, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, subtle skeletal changes, and poorly developed brain. The sibs had striking absent cranial vault with sloping of the forehead, large beaked nose, relatively large ears, and mandibular microretrognathia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed extremely simplified gyral pattern, large interhemispheric cyst and agenesis of corpus callosum, abnormally shaped hippocampus, and proportionately affected cerebellum and brainstem. In addition, fundus examination showed foveal
hypoplasia with optic nerve atrophy. No abnormalities of the internal organs were found. This profound formof microcephaly was identified at 17 weeks gestation by ultrasound and fetal brain MRI helped in characterizing the developmental brain malformations in the second sib. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such asRNU4ATAC,SLC25A19, and ASPM. These clinical and imaging findings are unlike that of any recognized severe forms of microcephaly which is believed to
be a new microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) with developmental brain malformations with most probably autosomal recessive inheritance based on consanguinity and similarly affected male and female sibs.

Hawass, Z., S. Ismail, A. Selim, S. N. Saleem, and D. Fathalla, "Revisiting the harem conspiracy and death of Ramesses III: anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study", BMJ: British Medical Journal, vol. 345, 2012. Abstract

Objective To investigate the true character of the harem conspiracy described in the Judicial Papyrus of Turin and determine whether Ramesses III was indeed killed.

Design Anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study of the mummies of Ramesses III and unknown man E, found together and taken from the 20th dynasty of ancient Egypt (circa 1190-1070 BC).

Results Computed tomography scans revealed a deep cut in Ramesses III’s throat, probably made by a sharp knife. During the mummification process, a Horus eye amulet was inserted in the wound for healing purposes, and the neck was covered by a collar of thick linen layers. Forensic examination of unknown man E showed compressed skin folds around his neck and a thoracic inflation. Unknown man E also had an unusual mummification procedure. According to genetic analyses, both mummies had identical haplotypes of the Y chromosome and a common male lineage.

Conclusions This study suggests that Ramesses III was murdered during the harem conspiracy by the cutting of his throat. Unknown man E is a possible candidate as Ramesses III’s son Pentawere.

Saleem, S. N., and Y. Y. Sabri, "Measuring Competence of Radiology Education Programs and Residents: The Egyptian Experience", Radiology Education: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 129–141, 2012. Abstract
n/a
Abdel-Salam, G. M. H., M. S. Abdel-Hamid, S. N. Saleem, M. K. H. Ahmed, M. Issa, L. K. Effat, H. F. Kayed, M. S. Zaki, and K. R. Gaber, "Profound microcephaly, primordial dwarfism with developmental brain malformations: A new syndrome", American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A: Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company, 2012. Abstract
n/a
Hawass, Z., S. Ismail, A. Selim, S. N. Saleem, D. Fathalla, S. Wasef, A. Z. Gad, R. Saad, S. Fares, H. Amer, et al., "Revisiting the harem conspiracy and death of Ramesses III: anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study", BMJ: British Medical Journal, vol. 345: BMJ, 2012. Abstract
n/a
2011
Lancaster, M. A., D. J. Gopal, J. Kim, S. N. Saleem, J. L. Silhavy, C. M. Louie, B. E. Thacker, Y. Williams, M. S. Zaki, and J. G. Gleeson, "Defective Wnt-dependent cerebellar midline fusion in a mouse model of Joubert syndrome", Nature Medicine, vol. 17, no. 6: Nature Publishing Group, pp. 726–731, 2011. Abstract
n/a
Lancaster, M. A., D. J. Gopal, J. Kim, S. N. Saleem, J. L. Silhavy, C. M. Louie, B. E. Thacker, Y. Williams, M. S. Zaki, and J. G. Gleeson, "Defective Wnt-dependent cerebellar midline fusion in a mouse model of Joubert syndrome", Nature medicine, vol. 17, no. 6: Nature Publishing Group, pp. 726–731, 2011. Abstract
n/a
Hawass, Z., and S. N. Saleem, "Mummified Daughters of King Tutankhamun: Archeologic and CT Studies", American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 197, no. 5: Am Roentgen Ray Soc, pp. W829–W836, 2011. Abstract
n/a
Zaki, M. S., G. M. H. Salam, S. N. Saleem, W. B. Dobyns, M. Y. Issa, S. Sattar, and J. G. Gleeson, "New recessive syndrome of microcephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, and congenital heart conduction defect", American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A: Wiley Online Library, 2011. Abstract
n/a
Saleem, S. N., M. S. Zaki, N. A. Soliman, and M. Momtaz, "Prenatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Molar Tooth Sign at 17 to 18 Weeks of Gestation in Two Fetuses at Risk for Joubert Syndrome and Related Cerebellar Disorders", Neuropediatrics, vol. 42, no. 1: Thieme, pp. 35–38, 2011. Abstract
n/a
2010
Behairy, N. H., S. Talaat, S. N. Saleem, and M. A. El-Raouf, "Magnetic resonance imaging in fetal anomalies: What does it add to 3D and 4D US?", European journal of radiology, vol. 74, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 250–255, 2010. Abstract
n/a
Behairy, N. H., S. Talaat, S. N. Saleem, and M. A. El-Raouf, "Magnetic resonance imaging in fetal anomalies: What does it add to 3D and 4D US?", European journal of radiology, vol. 74, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 250–255, 2010. Abstract
n/a
Saleem, S. N., and M. S. Zaki, "Role of MR imaging in prenatal diagnosis of pregnancies at risk for Joubert syndrome and related cerebellar disorders", American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 31, no. 3: Am Soc Neuroradiology, pp. 424–429, 2010. Abstract
n/a
Saleem, S. N., and M. S. Zaki, "Role of MR imaging in prenatal diagnosis of pregnancies at risk for Joubert syndrome and related cerebellar disorders", American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 31, no. 3: Am Soc Neuroradiology, pp. 424–429, 2010. Abstract
n/a
2009
Aglan, M. S., A. K. Abdel-Aleem, A. I. S. EL-Katoury, M. H. Hafez, S. N. Saleem, G. A. Otaify, and S. A. Temtamy, "Clinical, anthropometric, radiological and molecular characteristics of Egyptian achondroplasia patients", Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics, vol. 10, no. 1, 2009. Abstract
n/a
Aglan, M. S., A. K. Abdel-Aleem, A. I. S. EL-Katoury, M. H. Hafez, S. N. Saleem, G. A. Otaify, and S. A. Temtamy, "Clinical, anthropometric, radiological and molecular characteristics of Egyptian achondroplasia patients", Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics, vol. 10, no. 1, 2009. Abstract
n/a
Selim, L. A., M. S. Zaki, H. A. Hussein, S. N. Saleem, A. S. Kotoury, and M. Y. Issa, "Developmental abnormalities of mid and hindbrain: A study of 23 Egyptian patients", Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 215–236, 2009. Abstract
n/a
Saleem, S. N., A. H. Said, M. Abdel-Raouf, E. A. El-Kattan, M. S. Zaki, N. Madkour, and M. Shokry, "Fetal MRI in the evaluation of fetuses referred for sonographically suspected neural tube defects (NTDs): impact on diagnosis and management decision", Neuroradiology, vol. 51, no. 11: Springer, pp. 761–772, 2009. Abstract
n/a
Saleem, S. N., A. H. Said, M. Abdel-Raouf, E. A. El-Kattan, M. S. Zaki, N. Madkour, and M. Shokry, "Fetal MRI in the evaluation of fetuses referred for sonographically suspected neural tube defects (NTDs): impact on diagnosis and management decision", Neuroradiology, vol. 51, no. 11: Springer, pp. 761–772, 2009. Abstract
n/a
Tourism