Rheumatologists' knowledge and perception of COVID-19 and related vaccines: the vaXurvey2 online survey.

Citation:
Fathi, H. M., I. E. I. Gazzar, M. A. I. Elazeem, E. AboulKheir, N. M. Gamal, F. Ismail, R. E. R. Shereef, S. Tharwat, S. Elwan, N. Samy, et al., "Rheumatologists' knowledge and perception of COVID-19 and related vaccines: the vaXurvey2 online survey.", Rheumatology international, 2022.

Abstract:

The study aimed to explore the experience of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) infection and vaccine adverse events (AEs) among rheumatologists. A validated questionnaire was distributed as a Google form to rheumatologists across the country via social networking sites from late December 2021 till early January 2022. The questionnaire included questions regarding participants' socio-demographic details, COVID-19 infection and vaccination details with special emphasis on AEs. Out of 246 responses, 228 were valid. 200 (81.3%) responders had received the vaccine. The mean age of the 228 participants was 37.9 ± 8.5 years, 196 were females and 32 males (F:M 6.1:1) from 18 governorates across the country. Comorbidities were present in 54 subjects (27%). There was a history of highly suspicious or confirmed COVID-19 infection in 66.7% that were all managed at home. The COVID-19 vaccine was received by 200 and a booster dose of 18.5%. Obesity and musculoskeletal involvement co-morbidities were present only in those with AEs (9.1% and 5.5% respectively). AEs were present in 82%; 66.7% had injection-site tenderness, 50% fatigue, 35.5% fever, 15% chills, 42.5% myalgia, 14.5% arthralgia, 8% low back pain, headache 31%, dizziness 10%, sleepliness 16% and 15% developed post-vaccine. There were no differences according to the geolocation regarding the occurrence of COVID-19 infection (p = 0.19) or AEs post-vaccine (p = 0.58). The adverse events were mostly mild to moderate and tolerable which makes this work in agreement with other studies that support the broad safety of the vaccine in favor of the global benefit from mass vaccination.

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