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El-Santawy, M. F., A. N. Ahmed, and M. A. E. - B. Metwaly, "Ranking Facility Locations Using VIKOR", Computing and Information Systems Journal, vol. 16, issue 2, pp. 45-48, 2012. cisj-v16n2.pdf
, "Ranking Facility Locations Using VIKOR", Computing and Information Systems Journal, vol. 16, issue 2, pp, pp. 45-48, 2012.
Mohsen, A., "A rank-one updating approach for solving systems of linear equations in the least squares sense", Electronic Transactions on Numerical Analysis, vol. 29, pp. 97–115, 2008. Abstract
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Rabou, A. S., and E. - E. Aly, "Rank tests for the Two-sample problem when the sample size is random", Kuwait J. of Science & Engineering, vol. 28, pp. 55 - 68, 2001.
Abdelkader, S., A. B. Gershman, and K. M. Wong, "Rank reduction direction-of-arrival estimators with an improved robustness against subarray orientation errors", Signal Processing, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 54, no. 5: IEEE, pp. 1951–1955, 2006. Abstract
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Li, W., Y. Li, W. Darwish, S. Tang, Y. Hu, and W. Chen, "A Range-Independent Disparity-Based Calibration Model for Structured Light Pattern-Based RGBD Sensor", Sensors, vol. 20, issue 3: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute, pp. 639, 2020. Abstract
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Magdon-ismail, M., A. F. Atiya, A. Pratap, and Y. S. Abu-mostafa, Range and Maximal Drawdown of a Brownian Motion, , 2002. Abstract
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Sayed, A. M., S. M. Abdou, M. A. Rashwan, and H. Al-Barhamtoshy, "RANER: RDI Framework for Arabic Named Entity Recognition", International Journal of Engineering & Technology, vol. 8, issue 1.11, pp. 161-164, 2019. ijet-28187.pdf
Abdelhamid, M. H., A. S. Zayed, W. E. Ghoneima, A. A. Elmarakbi, M. S. Elsheemy, A. Aref, A. A. Elbary, and H. H. Nour, "Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare solifenacin versus trospium chloride in the relief of double-J stent-related symptoms.", World journal of urology, vol. 35, issue 8, pp. 1261-1268, 2017 Aug. Abstract

PURPOSE: We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of solifenacin versus trospium chloride and compare each drug versus placebo regarding the relief of stent-related symptoms following uncomplicated ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL).

METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind study, 210 eligible patients who underwent URSL with double-J stent insertion were recruited and randomly assigned to either the first group, receiving solifenacin (10 mg), second group, receiving trospium chloride (60 mg), or the third group, receiving placebo (one tablet). All patients were kept on study medication once daily during the entire 2-week postoperative period. All subjects were asked to complete a brief-form questionnaire to assess the lower urinary symptoms, stent-related body pain and hematuria, preoperatively and 2 weeks postoperatively.

RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences among the study groups in terms of mean age, gender, anthropometric measurements, stone and stent criteria. The overall symptom score, urgency, urge incontinence, flank pain, urethral pain and gross hematuria scores were significantly lower in solifenacin group compared to trospium chloride and placebo groups (p < 0.001). Concerning frequency and nocturia, there was no significant difference in mean scores across all groups. Drug-related side effects, particularly constipation, were higher in trospium group than in solifenacin one.

CONCLUSIONS: Solifenacin treatment showed significant improvement in almost all domains of stent-related symptoms than trospium. In terms of safety and tolerance, both drugs were comparable. Future studies should be designed to address the impact of combined drugs and lower doses in the management of DJ stent-related symptoms.

Abdelhamid, M. H., A. S. Zayed, W. E. Ghoneima, A. A. Elmarakbi, M. S. Elsheemy, A. Aref, A. A. Elbary, and H. H. Nour, "Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare solifenacin versus trospium chloride in the relief of double-J stent-related symptoms.", World journal of urology, vol. 35, issue 8, pp. 1261-1268, 2017 Aug. Abstract

PURPOSE: We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of solifenacin versus trospium chloride and compare each drug versus placebo regarding the relief of stent-related symptoms following uncomplicated ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL).

METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind study, 210 eligible patients who underwent URSL with double-J stent insertion were recruited and randomly assigned to either the first group, receiving solifenacin (10 mg), second group, receiving trospium chloride (60 mg), or the third group, receiving placebo (one tablet). All patients were kept on study medication once daily during the entire 2-week postoperative period. All subjects were asked to complete a brief-form questionnaire to assess the lower urinary symptoms, stent-related body pain and hematuria, preoperatively and 2 weeks postoperatively.

RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences among the study groups in terms of mean age, gender, anthropometric measurements, stone and stent criteria. The overall symptom score, urgency, urge incontinence, flank pain, urethral pain and gross hematuria scores were significantly lower in solifenacin group compared to trospium chloride and placebo groups (p < 0.001). Concerning frequency and nocturia, there was no significant difference in mean scores across all groups. Drug-related side effects, particularly constipation, were higher in trospium group than in solifenacin one.

CONCLUSIONS: Solifenacin treatment showed significant improvement in almost all domains of stent-related symptoms than trospium. In terms of safety and tolerance, both drugs were comparable. Future studies should be designed to address the impact of combined drugs and lower doses in the management of DJ stent-related symptoms.

Leem, J., J. Park, G. Han, S. Eun, M. Makary, S. W. Shin, K. Kim, K. Park, S. Lee, and J. Lee, "Randomized, crossover clinical trial for evaluating validity of various acupuncture device types", Integrative Medicine Research, vol. 4, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 108, 2015. Abstract
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Leem, J., J. Park, G. Han, S. Eun, M. Makary, S. W. Shin, K. Kim, K. Park, S. Lee, and J. Lee, "Randomized, crossover clinical trial for evaluating validity of various acupuncture device types", Integrative Medicine Research, vol. 4, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 108, 2015. Abstract
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Hany Aly, M. D., M. D. Magda Badawy, R. N.;MD, and M. D. Afaf Mohamed, "Randomized, Controlled Trial on Tracheal Colonization of Ventilated Infants: Can Gravity Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia?", Pediatrics, vol. 122, issue 4, pp. 770–774, 2008. tracheal_colonization_gravity.pdf
Mohlman, M. K., D. N. K. Boulos, M. E. Setouhy, G. Radwan, K. Makambi, I. Jillson, and C. A. Loffredo, a randomized, Controlled Community-Wide intervention to reduce environmental tobacco smoke exposure, , 2013. randomized_community_intervention_2013.pdf
Haig, G. M., E. E. Bain, W. Z. Robieson, J. D. Baker, and A. A. Othman, "A Randomized Trial to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of ABT-126, a Selective α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonist, in the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia.", The American journal of psychiatry, vol. 173, issue 8, pp. 827-35, 2016 Aug 01. AbstractWebsite

OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ABT-126, a selective α7 nicotinic receptor partial agonist, in stable patients with schizophrenia.

METHOD: A 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase 2 study was conducted in 22 centers in the United States. Clinically stable patients with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to receive once-daily dosing with 10 mg of ABT-126, 25 mg of ABT-126, or placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline to week 12 on the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) composite score compared with placebo, tested by a one-sided t test. Secondary measures included MCCB domain scores and UCSD Performance-Based Skills Assessment total score, each tested by two-sided t tests.

RESULTS: A total of 207 subjects were randomized, of whom 165 (81%) completed the study. ABT-126 showed an improvement that fell short of significance on the MCCB composite score at week 12 (least squares mean difference from placebo, 1.3 and 1.5 for the 10 mg and 25 mg groups, respectively). A significant treatment-by-smoking status interaction was observed on the mean change from baseline to final MCCB composite score: nonsmokers (N=69) demonstrated a difference from placebo of 2.9 (SE=1.4) in the 10 mg group and 5.2 (SE=1.6) in the 25 mg group, whereas no differences were observed in smokers (N=113). Among the nonsmokers in the ABT-126 25 mg group (N=19), significant improvements compared with placebo occurred at final assessment for verbal learning (least squares mean difference=5.5, SE=1.9), working memory (least squares mean difference=5.4, SE=2.0), and attention/vigilance (least squares mean difference=8.7, SE=2.5). The most frequently reported adverse events for ABT-126 were dizziness, diarrhea, and fatigue (all <8% incidence).

CONCLUSIONS: ABT-126 demonstrated a procognitive effect in nonsmoking subjects, particularly in verbal learning, working memory, and attention.

Haig, G. M., E. Bain, W. Robieson, A. A. Othman, J. Baker, and R. A. Lenz, "A Randomized Trial of the Efficacy and Safety of the H3 Antagonist ABT-288 in Cognitive Impairment Associated With Schizophrenia", Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 1433-1442, 2014. AbstractWebsite

{Introduction: ABT-288 is a highly potent histamine-3 receptor antagonist that has demonstrated pro-cognitive effects in preclinical models relevant to schizophrenia. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of two doses of ABT-288 in the treatment of cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group 12-week study was conducted at 23 centers in the United States. Clinically stable subjects with schizophrenia were randomized in an equal ratio to ABT-288 10mg, ABT-288 25mg, or placebo once daily while continuing their antipsychotic regimen. The primary efficacy measure was the change from baseline to day 84 evaluation on the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) composite score vs placebo. Secondary measures included cognitive functioning and psychiatric scales. Safety assessments and sparse pharmacokinetic sampling were also conducted. Results: A total of 214 subjects were randomized. The mean baseline MCCB composite score was 28.4. Approximately 80% of subjects completed the study. The MCCB composite score mean change from baseline to day 84 was numerically worse for both the 10mg (1.90

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