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Nisreen, E. M., A. M. Mahmoud, and M. M. Fahmy, "Parasitological and Comparative Pathological Studies on Monogenean Infestation of Cultured Sea Bream ( Sparus aurata , Spariidae) in Egypt", Oceanography, vol. 2, issue 4, pp. 129, 2014.
Nisreen, E. M., A. M. Mahmoud, and M. M. Fahmy, "Parasitological and Comparative Pathological Studies on Monogenean Infestation of Cultured Sea Bream ( Sparus aurata , Spariidae) in Egypt", Oceanography, vol. 2, issue 4, pp. 129, 2014.
Gadallah, N. S., Y. U. S. U. F. A. EDMARDASH, A. M. A. N. Y. N. MANSOUR, and A. H. M. E. D. I. IMAM, "Parasitoid wasps (Ichneumonoidea) collected from faba bean fields, Kharga Oasis, New Valley, Egypt, with new records and the description of a new species", Zootaxa, vol. 5389, issue 5, pp. 501-544, 2023.
GADALLAH, N. S., Y. A. Edmardash, A. N. Mansour, and A. I. Imam, "Parasitoid wasps (Ichneumonoidea) collected from faba bean fields, Kharga Oasis, New Valley, Egypt, with new records and the description of a new species", Zootaxa , vol. 5389, issue 5, pp. 501-544, 2023.
GADALLAH, N. S., H. A. GHOUNIEMY, A. A. ABD-ELGAYED, and H. M. Mahmoud, "Parasitoid fauna (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) of the Egyptian clover, Trifolium alexandrinum LINNAEUS, in Egypt", Entomofauna, vol. 35, issue 3, pp. 29-48, 2014.
Taha, N. M., S. H. I. M. A. A. ABDEL-RADI, F. S. Youssef, H. E. N. D. M. AUDA, M. M. El-Bahy, and R. M. Ramadan, "Parasiticidal efficacy of a new formulation of silver nanoparticles on Trichinella spiralis in vitro", Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research , vol. 12, issue 4, pp. 379-385, 2022.
Taha, N. M., S. H. I. M. A. A. ABDEL-RADI, F. S. Youssef3, H. E. N. D. M. AUDA, M. M. El-Bahy, and R. M. Ramadan, "Parasiticidal Efficacy of a New Formulation of Silver Nanoparticles on Trichinella spiralis In vitro", Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research , vol. 12, issue 4, pp. 379-385, 2022.
Taha, N. M., S. Abdel-Rad, F. S. Youssef, H. E. N. D. M. AUDA, M. M. El-Bahy, and R. M. Ramadan, "Parasiticidal Efficacy of a New Formulation of Silver Nanoparticles on Trichinella spiralis In vitro", Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research , vol. 12, issue 4, pp. 379-385, 2022. 1019-main_manuscript-7703-1-10-20220914_2.pdf
Salama, K. N., H. O. Elwan, and A. M. Soliman, "Parasitic-capacitance-insensitive voltage-mode MOSFET-C filters using differential current voltage conveyor", Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing, vol. 20, no. 1: Birkhäuser-Verlag, pp. 11–26, 2001. Abstract1-2001.pdf

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El-Garf, A., "Parasitic Rheumatism: Rheumatic Manifestations Associated with Calcified Guinea Worm", J Rheumatology , vol. 12, issue 5, pp. 976-9, 1985.
Shazly, M., A. - R. Bashtar, and K. Morsy, Parasitic Protozoa: Alveolata as human and animal parasites, , 2017.
Esmat, G., N. Zayed, and T. Elbaz, "Parasitic Liver Disease", Zakim and Boyer's Hepatology 7th Edition A Textbook of Liver Disease, Philadelphia, Elsevier, 2018. chapter_39_zakim_and_boyer.pdf
Barsoum, R. S., "Parasitic kidney disease: milestones in the evolution of our knowledge.", American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation, vol. 61, issue 3, pp. 501-13, 2013 Mar. Abstract

Of the 342 parasites that infect humans, 20 are associated with kidney disease, yet of these, only schistosomes, plasmodia, filariae, and leishmanias are held responsible for significant clinical or epidemiologic impact. Reviewing the evolution of human knowledge for these parasites discloses a lot of similarities regarding their discovery, patterns of kidney injury, and pathogenic mechanisms. From a historical perspective, our relevant information may be classified into 4 phases: (1) disease documentation in ancient and medieval scripts as far back as 2000-3000 bce; (2) discovery of the parasites, their life cycles, and clinical correlates by European clinicians working in African and Asian colonies during the second half of the 19th century; (3) discovery and characterization of the renal manifestations of monoparasitic infections during the second half of the 20th century; and (4) recognition of the confounding effects of coinfection with bacteria, viruses, or other parasites. The spectrum of respective kidney diseases extends all the way from acute kidney injury to glomerulonephritis, amyloidosis, urologic disorders, and malignancy. Discovery of the common immunopathogenetic host response to parasitic infections has provided a knowledge core that explains the similarities, diversities, and interactions with regard to kidney injury.

Barsoum, R. S., "Parasitic infections in transplant recipients.", Nature clinical practice. Nephrology, vol. 2, issue 9, pp. 490-503, 2006 Sep. Abstract

Parasitic infections are important complications of organ transplantation that are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of post-transplantation pyrexial illness. Although their frequency is unknown, they seem to be much less prevalent than bacterial and viral infections. Only 5% of human pathogenic parasites have been reported to cause significant illness in transplant recipients. Infection can occur via transmission with the graft or blood transfusion, or be acquired de novo from the environment. Recrudescence of dormant infection can lead to active disease. Post-transplantation parasitic disorders tend to cluster into two clinical profiles. First, an acute systemic illness with anemia, constitutional manifestations and variable stigmata of organ involvement; acute graft dysfunction can lead to confusion and acute rejection. Protozoa including malarial Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma and Toxoplasma are associated with this profile. The second typical manifestation encompasses a few localized syndromes, usually associated with the lower gastrointestinal tract, caused by either protozoa (Cryptosporidium and microsporidia) or nematodes (Strongyloides and Ascaris). Dissemination of localized infections can lead to life-threatening systemic manifestations. A high index of suspicion is essential, as diagnosis requires special sampling techniques and laboratory procedures. Definitive diagnosis is usually achieved by detecting the parasite in the patient's tissues or body fluids by histological examination or culture, or by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the parasite-specific antigen sequence. Antibody detection using serological techniques is also possible in a few parasitic infections. Certain lesions have characteristic radiological appearances, hence the value of imaging, particularly in the cerebral syndromes. Treatment is usually straightforward (broad spectrum or specific drugs), yet some species are drug resistant.

Barsoum, R. S., "Parasitic infections in organ transplantation.", Experimental and clinical transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation, vol. 2, issue 2, pp. 258-67, 2004 Dec. Abstract

More than 340 parasitic species infect more than 3 billion people worldwide with varying morbidity and mortality. The Tropics constitute the main reservoir of infection with the highest clinical impact, owing to favorable ecological factors. Acquisition of infection, clinical severity, and outcome of a parasitic disease depend on innate and acquired host immunity as well as the parasite's own immune response against the host when infection is established. Organ transplant recipients may acquire significant parasitic disease in 3 ways: transmission with the graft, de novo infection, or activation of dormant infection as a consequence of immunosuppression. Malaria, Trypanosoma, Toxoplasma, and Leishmania are the principal parasites that may be transmitted with bone marrow, kidney, or liver homografts, and microsporidia with xenotransplants. De novo infection with malaria and kala-azar may occur in immunocompromised travelers visiting in endemic areas, while immunocompromised natives are subject to superinfection with different strains of endemic parasites, reinfection with schistosomiasis, or rarely, with primary infections such as acanthamoeba. The list of parasites that may be reactivated in the immunocompromised host includes giardiasis, balantidiasis, strongyloidiasis, capillariasis, malaria, Chagas' disease, and kalaazar. The broad clinical syndromes of parasitic infection in transplant recipients include prolonged pyrexia, lower gastrointestinal symptoms, bronchopneumonia, and meningoencephalitis. Specific syndromes include the hematologic manifestations of malaria, myocarditis in Chagas' disease, acute renal failure in malaria and leishmaniasis, and the typical skin lesions of Chagas' and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Many antiparasitic drugs have the potential for gastrointestinal, hepatic, renal, and hematologic toxicity, and may interact with the metabolism of immunosuppressive agents. It is recommended that transplant clinicians have a high index of suspicion of parasitic infections as an important transmission threat, as well as a potential cause of significant posttransplant morbidity.

N.A.El-Dib, "Parasitic infection of liver and G.I.T. tract in children in Egypt. ", First Annual Meeting of Egyptian Society of Pediatric Hepatology and Gasteronoenterology. , Nile Hilton Hotel, Cairo, 28 December, Submitted.
El-Badry, A. A., and A. M. Mahgoub, "Parasitic Diarrhoea in Hospitalized Children: Community or Hospital-Acquired?", The Egyptian Journal of Medical Sciences , vol. 27, issue 2, pp. 955-962, 2006.
Mahmoud, N. E., M.M.Fahmy, M. Abuowarda.M, and M. S. Khattab, "Parasitic Cymothoid Isopods and their Impacts in Commercially Important Fishes From Lake Qarun, Egypt, ", International Journal of ChemTech Research , vol. 9 , issue 12, pp. 221-229, 2016.
Mahmoud, N. E. E. - D., M. M. Fahmy, M. A. Mahmoud, and M. S. Khattab, "Parasitic Cymothoid Isopods and their Impacts in Commercially Important Fishes From Lake Qarun, Egypt", International Journal of ChemTech Research, , vol. 9, issue 12, pp. 221-229, 2016.
Mahmoud, N. E., M.M.Fahmy, M. Abuowarda.M, and M. S. Khattab, "Parasitic Cymothoid Isopods and their Impacts in Commercially Important Fishes From Lake Qarun, Egypt", International Journal of ChemTech Research, vol. 9, issue 12, pp. 221-229, 2016. 221-229v9n12ct.pdf
E., M. N., F. M. M., A. M. M., and K. M. S., "Parasitic Cymothoid Isopods and their Impacts in Commercially Important Fishes From Lake Qarun, Egypt", International Journal of ChemTech Research, vol. 9, issue 12, pp. 221-229, 2016. Mahmoud et al., 2016.pdf
Khamis, N., E. Hegazi, E. Agamy, M. Altahtawy, S. Ali, and W. Khafagi, "Parasitic Capacity and Longevity of Three Local Trichogramma spp.(Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae)", Egyptian Journal of Biological Pest Control, vol. 24, issue 2: Egyptian Society for Biological Control of Pests, pp. 307, 2014. Abstract
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MohamAmir, A., Parasitic Antigen for Vaccine Development, , Germany, Anchor Academic publisher, 2016.