Publications

Export 363 results:
Sort by: Author Title [ Type  (Asc)] Year
Journal Article
.Afifi, N. A., and R. A., "Kinetic disposition, systemic bioavailability and tissue distribution of apramycin in broiler chickens.", Res. Vet. Sci., , vol. 62(3):, pp. 249-252, 1997.
Afifi, N. A., and A. Ramadan, "Kinetic disposition, systemic bioavailability and tissue distribution of apramycin in broiler chickens.", Research in veterinary science, vol. 62, issue 3, pp. 249-52, 1997 May-Jun. Abstract

Apramycin was administered to chickens orally, intramuscularly and intravenously to determine blood concentration, kinetic behaviour, bioavailability and tissue residues. Single doses of apramycin at the rate of 75 mg kg-1 body weight were given to broiler chickens by intracrop, i.m. and i.v. routes. The highest serum concentrations of apramycin were reached 0.20 and 0.76 hours after the oral and i.m. doses with an absorption half-life (t1/2(ab.)) of 0.10 and 0.19 hours and an elimination half life (t1/2(beta)) of 1.22 and 2.31 hours respectively. The systemic bioavailability was 2.0 and 58 per cent after intracrop and i.m. administration, respectively, indicating poor absorption of the drug when given orally. Following i.v. injection, the kinetics of apramycin was described by a two-compartment open model with a (t1/2(alpha)) of 1.5 hours, (t1/2(beta)) of 2.1 hours. Vd(ss) (volume of distribution) of 4.82 litre kg-1 and C1(B) (total body clearance) of 1.88 litre kg-1 hour-1. The serum protein-binding of apramycin was 26 per cent. The highest tissue concentrations of apramycin were present in the kidneys and liver. No apramycin residues were detected in tissues after six hours except in the liver and kidneys following intracrop dosing and kidneys following i.m. administration.

Atef, M., A. Y. I. El-Gendi, S. A. H. Youssef, and A. M. M. Amer, "Kinetic disposition, systemic bioavailability and tissue distribution of oxytetracycline in chickens", Archiv fuer Gefluegelkunde (Germany, FR), 1986. Abstract
n/a
Atef, M., R. A, S. A. H. Youssef, and K. Abo El-Sooud, "Kinetic disposition, systemic bioavailability and tissue distribution of salinomycin in chickens", Research in Veterinary science, vol. 54, pp. 179-183, 1993.
Atef, M., A. Ramadan, S. A. H. Youssef, and A. K. EL-Sooud, "Kinetic disposition, systemic bioavailability and tissue distribution of salinomycin in chickens", Research in veterinary science, vol. 54, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 179–183, 1993. Abstract
n/a
Atef, M., A. Ramadan, S. A. Youssef, and K. Abo El-Sooud, "Kinetic disposition, systemic bioavailability and tissue distribution of salinomycin in chickens.", Research in veterinary science, vol. 54, issue 2, pp. 179-83, 1993 Mar. Abstract

Salinomycin was administered to chickens orally and intravenously to determine blood concentration, kinetic behaviour, bioavailability and tissue residues. The drug was given by intracrop and intravenous routes in a single dose of 20 mg kg-1 body-weight. The highest serum concentrations of salinomycin were reached half an hour after oral dosage with an absorption half-life (t0.5(ab)) of 3.64 hours and elimination half-life (t0.5(beta)) of 1.96 hours. The systemic bioavailability percentage was 73.02 per cent after intracrop administration, indicating the high extent of salinomycin absorption from this route in chickens. Following intravenous injection the kinetics of salinomycin can be described by a two-compartment open model with a t1/2(alpha) of 0.48 hours, Vd ss (volume of distribution) of 3.28 litre kg-1 and Cl(beta) (total body clearance) of 27.39 ml kg-1 min-1. The serum protein-binding tendency of salinomycin as calculated in vitro was 19.78 per cent. Salinomycin concentrations in the serum and tissues of birds administered salinomycin premix (60 ppm) for two weeks were lower than those after administration of a single intracrop dose of pure salinomycin (20 mg kg-1 bodyweight). The highest concentration of salinomycin residues were present in the liver followed by the kidneys, muscles, fat, heart and skin. No salinomycin residues were detected in tissues after 48 hours except in the liver and these had disappeared completely by 72 hours.

Atef, M., A. Ramadan, S. A. Youssef, and K. Abo El-Sooud, "Kinetic disposition, systemic bioavailability and tissue distribution of salinomycin in chickens.", Research in veterinary science, vol. 54, issue 2, pp. 179-83, 1993 Mar. Abstract

Salinomycin was administered to chickens orally and intravenously to determine blood concentration, kinetic behaviour, bioavailability and tissue residues. The drug was given by intracrop and intravenous routes in a single dose of 20 mg kg-1 body-weight. The highest serum concentrations of salinomycin were reached half an hour after oral dosage with an absorption half-life (t0.5(ab)) of 3.64 hours and elimination half-life (t0.5(beta)) of 1.96 hours. The systemic bioavailability percentage was 73.02 per cent after intracrop administration, indicating the high extent of salinomycin absorption from this route in chickens. Following intravenous injection the kinetics of salinomycin can be described by a two-compartment open model with a t1/2(alpha) of 0.48 hours, Vd ss (volume of distribution) of 3.28 litre kg-1 and Cl(beta) (total body clearance) of 27.39 ml kg-1 min-1. The serum protein-binding tendency of salinomycin as calculated in vitro was 19.78 per cent. Salinomycin concentrations in the serum and tissues of birds administered salinomycin premix (60 ppm) for two weeks were lower than those after administration of a single intracrop dose of pure salinomycin (20 mg kg-1 bodyweight). The highest concentration of salinomycin residues were present in the liver followed by the kidneys, muscles, fat, heart and skin. No salinomycin residues were detected in tissues after 48 hours except in the liver and these had disappeared completely by 72 hours.

Atef, M., S. A. Youssef, A. Ramadan, and M. Issa, "Kinetic disposition, systemic bioavailability, tissue levels and acetylation of some sulphonamides in goats.", Archives internationales de pharmacodynamie et de thérapie, vol. 302, pp. 27–39, 1988. Abstract
n/a
Atef, M., S. A. Youssef, A. Ramadan, and M. Issa, "Kinetic disposition, systemic bioavailability, tissue levels and acetylation of some sulphonamides in goats.", Archives internationales de pharmacodynamie et de therapie, vol. 302, pp. 27-39, 1989 Nov-Dec. Abstract

Sulphamethoxazole, sulphadimethyloxazole and sulphadimethoxine were once administered in goats via oral and i.v. route (100 mg/kg b.wt.) for determination of plasma and urine concentrations of the unchanged sulphonamides and their acetylated derivatives, kinetic behavior, systemic bioavailability, tissue levels and acetylation. The highest plasma concentrations of sulphamethoxazole, sulphadimethyloxazole and sulphadimethoxine were reached after 0.64, 1.31 and 0.46 hr following oral administration, with an absorption half-life of 0.84, 1.31 and 0.38 hr and an elimination half-life of 3.51, 5.01 and 5.55 hr, respectively. Following a single i.v. injection, the kinetic disposition of sulphamethoxazole and sulphadimethoxine followed a one-compartmental model with an elimination half-life of 1.48 and 1.76 hr and a total body clearance-time curve of sulphadimethyloxazole, after a single i.v. injection, could be described by a two-compartmental open model with an elimination half-life of 3.27 hr, a volume of distribution of 248.07 ml/kg and a total body clearance of 0.82 ml/kg/min. The systemic bioavailability was 19.95, 11.37 and 23.27% after oral administration of sulphamethoxazole, sulphadimethyloxazole and sulphadimethoxine, respectively. The percentages of serum protein binding of sulphamethoxazole, sulphadimethyloxazole and sulphadimethoxine were determined in most of the body tissues, collected 4 hr after i.v. injection. The highest concentration was found in kidney and liver. On the other hand, sulphamethoxazole, sulphadimethyloxazole and sulphadimethoxine were N4-acetylated in the body tissues to a higher extent than that in plasma. Acetylation was highest in rumen and skeletal muscle.

, "Kinetic energy release in unimolecular ion decomposition of substituted benzophenones ", Indian journal of pure and applied physics, vol. 30, pp. 376-379, 1992.
Goss, D. J., L. J. Parkhurst, and H. Görisch, "Kinetic light scattering studies on the dissociation of hemoglobin from Lumbricus terrestris.", Biochemistry, vol. 14, issue 25, pp. 5461-4, 1975 Dec 16. Abstract

The kinetics of the pH-induced dissociation of the 3 X 10(6) mol wt hemoglobin from Lumbricus terrestris (the earthworm) have been studied in a light-scattering stopped-flow apparatus. The ligand dependent dissociation data were fit well by a simple sequential model. The data for CO and oxyhemoglobin are consistent with Hb12 leads to 2Hb6 leads to 12Hb. Methemoglobin at pH 7 appears to be hexameric and the dissociation is consistent with the model: Hb6 leads to 6Hb. In a sequential decay scheme for which light-scattering changes are monitored, the relative amounts of rapid and slow phase are determined by the rate constants as well as the molecular weights of intermediate species. Assignment of the hexameric intermediate is supported by an investigation of the sensitivity of the theoretical kinetic curves to the molecular weights of the intermediates. This assignment is further supported by the following: (1) the same model will fit the data for oxy- and CO-hemoglobin at all three temperatures (a 24-29-fold variation in rate constants), (2) evidence from electron microscopy shows hexameric forms, and (3) methemoglobin is apparently stable as a hexamer at pH 7. When CO replaces O2 as the ligand, the dissociation rate increases by a factor of four. The met is about 20 times faster than the initial oxyhemoglobin dissociation rate, but perhaps more relevant for comparing dissociation of the hexamer, the met rate was respectively 100 times and 500 times faster than that for the assumed hexameric forms of CO- and oxy-hemoglobin. The activation energies for the dodecamer to hexamer dissociation and for the dissociation of the hexamer to smaller forms were about 30 kcal/mol for oxy-, CO-, and methemoglobin.

Mohammed, A. A., S. - E. K. Fateen, T. S. Ahmed, and T. M. Moustafa, "A kinetic model for ethylene oligomerization using zirconium/aluminum- and nickel/zinc-based catalyst systems in a batch reactor", Applied Petrochemical Research, 2014.
Mohammed, A. A., S. - E. K. Fateen, T. S. Ahmed, and T. M. Moustafa, "A Kinetic Model for Ethylene Oligomerization Using Zirconium/Aluminum- and Nickel/Zinc-Based Catalyst Systems in a Batch Reactor", Applied Petrochemical Research, vol. 4, issue 3: Springer, pp. 287-295, 2014. Abstract

n/a

Ali, A., R. B. Mahar, E. M. Abdelsalam, and S. T. H. Sherazi, "Kinetic modeling for bioaugmented anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste by using Fe3O4 nanoparticles", Waste and biomass valorization, vol. 10, no. 11: Springer Netherlands, pp. 3213–3224, 2019. Abstract
n/a
Selim, K. A., F. H. A. El-Rahiem, and A. A. El-Midany, "Kinetic Modelling and Equilibrium of Amphoteric Collector Adsorption on Silica and Hematite", Tenside Surfactants Detergents Journal For Theory Technology And Application, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 85, 2009. Abstract
n/a
Allah, G. A. G., A. H. A. El-Rahman, W. A. Badawy, and M. M.Abou-Romia, "Kinetic of Passivation of Valve Metal in Deaerated Salt Solutions", B. Electrochem, issue 4, 1988.
Alamein, A. M. A. A., "Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Zafirlukast in Bulk and in Drug Formulations", Life Science Journal; Life Sci J 2012, vol. 9, issue 4, pp. 2693-2701, 2012.
Sayyah, S. M., M. Rehahn, A. H. M. Elwahy, and M. T. H. Abou-Kana, "Kinetic studies on the dilatometric-free radical copolymerization of new modified laser dye monomer with methyl methacrylate and characterization of the obtained copolymer", Journal of applied polymer science, vol. 112, no. 4: Wiley Online Library, pp. 2462–2471, 2009. Abstract
n/a
Heakal, E. - T. F., A. S. Mogoda, A. A. Mazhar, and M. S. El-Basiouny, "Kinetic studies on the dissolution of the anodic oxide film on titanium in phosphoric acid solutions ", Corrosion Science, vol. 27, issue 5, pp. 453-462, 1987.
Mogoda, A. S., M. M. Hefny, G. A. El-Mahdy, and M. S. El-Basiouny, "Kinetic studies on the formation and dissolution of the anodic oxide film of tungsten in formic acid solutions.", Bull Soc Chim Fr, vol. 128, pp. 155, 1991.
Zaazaa, H. E., M. M. Abdelrahman, N. W. Ali, M. A. Magdy, and M. Abdelkawy, "Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation", Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, vol. 132 , pp. 655-662, 2014.
Ellaithy, M. M., N. A. El-Ragehy, and M. A. El-Ghobashy, "Kinetic study of alkaline induced hydrolysis of the skeletal muscle relaxant chlorzoxazone using ratio spectra first derivative spectrophotometry", Il Farmaco, vol. 58, no. 4: Elsevier, pp. 337–342, 2003. Abstract
n/a
Hefny, M. M., A. S. Mogoda, S. A. Salih, and H. E. El-Kiky, "Kinetic study of currentless dissolution of bismuth oxide film in aqueous solution containing electroactive species.", Thin solid films , vol. 204, pp. 193, 1991.
Ghobashy, M., M. Gadallah, T. T. El-Idreesy, M. A. Sadek, and H. A. Elazab, "Kinetic study of hydrolysis of ethyl acetate using caustic soda", International Journal of Engineering & Technology, vol. 7, issue 4, pp. 19995-1999, 2018.