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Yousif, I. A. H., E. M. A. el dine Tealab, A. A. A. Hady, and A. A. A. A. b, "Hydropedological Assessment of Wadi El-Raml at the Northwestern Coast of Egypt", Scientific African, vol. 17 , issue (2022) e01322, pp. 1-25, 2022.
Yousef, H. A., A. Afify, A. A. Meguid, and Hany M Hassan, "Heat shock proteins development in different stages of Schistocerca gregaria as response to heavy metals intoxication", Natural Science, vol. Vol.3, , issue No.3, , pp. 218-226 , 2011. heat_shock_proteins.pdf
Yousef, H. A., A. Afify, A. A. Meguid, and H. M. Hasan, "Heat shock proteins development in different stages of schistocerca gregaria as a response to heavy metals intoxication.", Natural Science, vol. 3, issue 3, pp. 218-226, 2011.
Younis, R. A., "How Does Employer Brand Influence Employees’ Openness To Change? The Mediating Role Of Organizational Identification And Work Meaningfulness", British Academy of Management (BAM) 2020 conference proceeding , United Kingdom, Available at: https://app.oxfordabstracts.com/events/1520/submissions/206651/question/25454/programme-builder/download, ISBN: 978-0-9956413-3-4, 2020.
Younis, R. A., "Human Resource Management Practices and the perceived Hospital performance The mediating role of Intellectual Capital.", Scientific Journal for Economic& Commerce, vol. 48, issue 3, pp. 559-586, 2018. AbstractWebsite

An extensive literature review covered two perspectives, namely, 'Human resource management (HRM) predict organizational performance' (OP), and intellectual capital predicts organizational performance. However, the linkage of "whether a bundle of good HR practices facilitates intellectual capital, which then leads to better organizational performance" is still a research gap. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of high - performance work system ( HPWS) on perceived hospital performance. In addition, this paper interesting in examining the mediating role of Human, Social and Organization capital in the hypothesized model. Data were collected from 198 HR managers working in private healthcare organizations in great Cairo. The analytical method used to empirically test the hypotheses is the structural equation modeling technique using AMOS( V.22) . The two steps are the assessment of the outer model and the assessment of the inner model. Results found that only human and social capital mediates HR practices-organizational performance relationship. This study is considered one of the first studies that examine the mediating role Human, Social and organization capital on the relationship between 'good HR practices' and organizational performance in private healthcare sector within Arab countries.  

Younan, M. Y. A., and M. M. Megahed, "Hany F. Abdalla", Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology, vol. 133, pp. 051212–1, 2011. Abstract
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Yosry, A., W. Doss, A. Abdel-Bary, G. Esmat, M. El-Serafy, E. Omar, A. El-Tawil, A. Ghaly, A. Hosny, S. Rifaat, et al., "Hepatitis C virus genotype 4 recurrence in Egyptian living donor liver transplant recipients.", LIVER TRANSPLANTATION, vol. 11, no. 7}, Meeting Abstract = {76, pp. C19, JUL, 2005. Abstract
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Yosry, A., M. Said, G. Esmat, M. Al-Serafy, W. Doss, D. Omran, Y. Saad, S. Kamel, A. Abdel-Bary, Y. Hatata, et al., "HLA Tissue Typing Has No Effect on the Outcome of Patients Undergoing a Living-donor Liver Transplant: A Single-center Experience in Egypt", Experimental and Clinical Transplantation, vol. 10, issue 2, pp. 136-140, 2012.
Yosry, A., Y. El-Sharif, A. Hendawi, G. Esmat, M. Salah, and S. Zakaria, "Hepatic cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and response to combined Interferon & Ribavirin therapy in chronic hepatitis C", JOURNAL OF HEPATOLOGY, vol. 42, no. 2}, Meeting Abstract = {623, pp. 228, APR, 2005. Abstract
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Yosry, A., M. Said, G. Esmat, M. Al-Serafy, A. Omar, W. Doss, D. Omran, Y. Saad, S. Kamel, A. Abdel-Bary, et al., "HLA Tissue Typing Has No Effect on the Outcome of Patients Undergoing a Living-donor Liver Transplant: A Single-center Experience in Egypt", EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL TRANSPLANTATION, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 136-140, APR, 2012. Abstract
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Yosry, A., M. Said, G. Esmat, M. Al-Serafy, A. Omar, W. Doss, D. Omran, Y. Saad, S. Kamel, A. Abdel-Bary, et al., "HLA tissue typing has no effect on the outcome of patients undergoing a living-donor liver transplant: a single-center experience in Egypt.", Experimental and clinical transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation, vol. 10, issue 2, pp. 136-40, 2012 Apr. Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To analyze the effect of human leukocyte antigen tissue typing on outcome of live-donor liver transplant.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty recipients underwent live-donor liver transplant in the Dar Al-Fouad Hospital in Egypt and were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were classified into 2 groups: those with human leukocyte antigen +ve, and those with human leukocyte antigen -ve and donors. Hepatitis C virus-related end-stage liver disease was the main indication for transplant. Demographic data, preoperative laboratory data, results of human leukocyte antigen tissue typing, Child score, model for end-stage liver disease score, graft/recipient weight-ratio, ischemia times, surgical complications, postoperative laboratory data, liver biopsy, immunosuppression, and pulse steroids were collected. Graft and patient survivals were studied using Kaplan-Meier curves.

RESULTS: The mean model end-stage liver disease score was 18 ± 3.61 in group 1 and 17.73 ± 3.72 in group 2, with no significant difference. Graft/recipient weight ratio, ischemia times, and postoperative complications showed P = NS. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus were used in 5/9, 8/41, and 4/9 in group 1, and 32/41 in group 2 (P = NS). Rejection and pulse steroids were reported in 3/9 and 12/41 of group 1, and 3/12 and 11/41 of group 2 (P = NS). Hepatitis C virus-recurrence was diagnosed in 5/9 of patients (55%) and 8/41 of patients (29.5%) in groups 1 and 2 (P < .05). No statistical difference was found regarding mortality; 5-year patient and graft survival was 35/50 (70% in group 1 [human leukocyte antigen +ve]), 7/9 (77.8%), and 28/41 in group 2 (68.3%) (human leukocyte antigen -ve).

CONCLUSIONS: Positive human leukocyte antigen typing before live-donor liver transplant has no effect on the incidence of postoperative complications, rejection episodes, and patient or graft survival. Recipients with positive human leukocyte antigen typing may have increased risk of hepatitis C virus-recurrence after live-donor liver transplant.

Yosry, A., R. M. Dawood, M. Elsharkawy, A. Khairy, M. Khairy, N. G. Bader El Din, and Z. abdellatif, "Highly Sensitive Serum miRNA Panel for the Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Egyptian Patients with HCV-Related HCC", Laboratory medicine, vol. 53, issue 5, pp. 523–529, 2022.
Yehia, R. S., Highlighting the potential for crude oil bioremediation of locally isolated Cunninghamella echinulata and Mucor circinelloides, , vol. 54, issue 3, pp. 1969 - 1981, 2023. AbstractWebsite

The current investigation was carried out to assess the potential of fungi isolated from polluted soil samples in Al Jubail, Saudi Arabia, to degrade crude oil. In a minimal salt medium with 1% crude oil as the carbon source, the growth potential of various fungal isolates was examined. Among twelve fungal isolates, YS-6 and YS-10, identified as Cunninghamella echinulata and Mucor circinelloides based on multiple sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses, were selected as having superior crude oil degrading abilities. To the best of our knowledge, the isolated species have never been detected in polluted soil samples in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. YS-6 and YS-10 have shown their capacity to metabolize crude oil by removing 59.7 and 78.1% of crude oil, respectively. Interestingly, they succeeded in reducing the surface tension to 41.2 and 35.9 mN/m, respectively. Moreover, the emulsification activity and hydrophobicity were determined to be 36.7, 44.9, 35.9, and 53.4%, respectively. The recovery assays included zinc sulfate, ammonium sulfate, acid precipitation, and solvent extraction techniques. All these approaches showed that the amount of biosurfactants correlates to the tested hydrocarbons. Furthermore, the enzyme activity of these two isolates generated significantly more laccase (Lac) than manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP), as compared to the control. In conclusion, our study highlights new perspectives on the fungal resources found in persistently polluted terrestrial ecosystems. This knowledge will be useful for bioremediation, safe disposal of petroleum-oil contamination, and other industrial uses.

Ye, R., M. Pi, M. M. Nooh, S. W. Bahout, and D. L. Quarles, "Human GPRC6A Mediates Testosterone-Induced Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and mTORC1 Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells.", Molecular pharmacology, vol. 95, issue 5, pp. 563-572, 2019 05. Abstract

G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A) is activated by testosterone and modulates prostate cancer progression. Most humans have a GPRC6A variant that contains a recently evolved KGKY insertion/deletion in the third intracellular loop (ICL3) (designated as GPRC6A) that replaces the ancestral KGRKLP sequence (GPRC6A) present in all other species. In vitro assays purport that human GPRC6A is retained intracellularly and lacks function. These findings contrast with ligand-dependent activation and coupling to mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling of endogenous human GPRC6A in PC-3 cells. To understand these discrepant results, we expressed mouse (mGPRC6A), human (hGPRC6A), and humanized mouse (mGPRC6A) GPRC6A into human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Our results demonstrate that mGPRC6A acts as a classic G protein-coupled receptor, which is expressed at the cell membrane and internalizes in response to ligand activation by testosterone. In contrast, hGPRC6A and humanized mouse mGPRC6A are retained intracellularly in ligand naive cells, yet exhibit -arrestin-dependent signaling responses, mitogen-activated protein kinase [i.e., extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)], and p70S6 kinase phosphorylation in response to testosterone, indicating that hGPRC6A is functional. Indeed, testosterone stimulates time- and dose-dependent activation of ERK, protein kinase B, and mTORC1 signaling in wild-type PC-3 cells that express endogenous GPRC6A In addition, testosterone stimulates GPRC6A-dependent cell proliferation in wild-type PC-3 cells and inhibits autophagy by activating mTORC1 effectors eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 and Unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1. Testosterone activation of GPRC6A has the obligate requirement for calcium in the incubation media. In contrast, in GPRC6A-deficient cells, the effect of testosterone to activate downstream signaling is abolished, indicating that human GPRC6A is required for mediating the effects of testosterone on cell proliferation and autophagy.

YE, E., K. J, S. J, Y. RM, E. R. AA, H. NS, S. OG, G. M, N. - K. L, and L. Poole, Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects melanocytes from stress-induced cell death: implications for vitiligo., , vol. 20, issue 6, 2011. Abstractcu_pdf.pdf

To study protection of melanocytes from stress-induced cell death by heme oxygenases during depigmentation and repigmentation in vitiligo, expression of isoforms 1 and 2 was studied in cultured control and patient melanocytes and normal skin explants exposed to UV or bleaching agent 4-TBP. Similarly, expression of heme oxygenases was followed in skin from vitiligo patients before and after PUVA treatment. Single and double immunostainings were used in combination with light and confocal microscopic analysis and Western blotting. Melanocyte expression of heme oxygenase 1 is upregulated, whereas heme oxygenase 2 is reduced in response to UV and 4-TBP. Upregulation of inducible heme oxygenase 1 was also observed in UV-treated explant cultures, in skin of successfully PUVA-treated patients and in melanocytes cultured from vitiligo non-lesional skin. Heme oxygenase encoding genes were subsequently cloned to study consequences of either gene product on cell viability, demonstrating that HO-1 but not HO-2 overexpression offers protection from stress-induced cell death in MTT assays. HO-1 expression by melanocytes may contribute to beneficial effects of UV treatment for vitiligo patients.
© 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Ye, R., M. Pi, M. M. Nooh, S. W. Bahout, and D. L. Quarles, "Human GPRC6A Mediates Testosterone-Induced Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and mTORC1 Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells.", Molecular pharmacology, vol. 95, issue 5, pp. 563-572, 2019 05. Abstract

G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A) is activated by testosterone and modulates prostate cancer progression. Most humans have a GPRC6A variant that contains a recently evolved KGKY insertion/deletion in the third intracellular loop (ICL3) (designated as GPRC6A) that replaces the ancestral KGRKLP sequence (GPRC6A) present in all other species. In vitro assays purport that human GPRC6A is retained intracellularly and lacks function. These findings contrast with ligand-dependent activation and coupling to mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling of endogenous human GPRC6A in PC-3 cells. To understand these discrepant results, we expressed mouse (mGPRC6A), human (hGPRC6A), and humanized mouse (mGPRC6A) GPRC6A into human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Our results demonstrate that mGPRC6A acts as a classic G protein-coupled receptor, which is expressed at the cell membrane and internalizes in response to ligand activation by testosterone. In contrast, hGPRC6A and humanized mouse mGPRC6A are retained intracellularly in ligand naive cells, yet exhibit -arrestin-dependent signaling responses, mitogen-activated protein kinase [i.e., extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)], and p70S6 kinase phosphorylation in response to testosterone, indicating that hGPRC6A is functional. Indeed, testosterone stimulates time- and dose-dependent activation of ERK, protein kinase B, and mTORC1 signaling in wild-type PC-3 cells that express endogenous GPRC6A In addition, testosterone stimulates GPRC6A-dependent cell proliferation in wild-type PC-3 cells and inhibits autophagy by activating mTORC1 effectors eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 and Unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1. Testosterone activation of GPRC6A has the obligate requirement for calcium in the incubation media. In contrast, in GPRC6A-deficient cells, the effect of testosterone to activate downstream signaling is abolished, indicating that human GPRC6A is required for mediating the effects of testosterone on cell proliferation and autophagy.

e Yates, S. C. a, M. b Hafez, M. a Beld, V. V. a Lukashov, Z. b Hassan, G. b c Carboni, H. b Khaled, M. d McMorrow, M. b Attia, and J. a Goudsmit, "Hepatocellular carcinoma in Egyptians with and without a history of hepatitis B virus infection: Association with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection but not with HCV RNA level", American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 60, no. 4, pp. 714-720, 1999. AbstractWebsite

The aim of this study was to analyze the association of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Egypt, using hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) as virus controls. In addition, the association of HCC with HCV RNA levels among persons seropositive for HCV was analyzed. We compared 131 patients with proven HCC, 247 with bladder cancer, and 466 healthy hospital employees. Age, sex, and place of residence were recorded to study confounding factors. Among the healthy controls, 16% were seropositive for HCV, 21% for HBV, and 31% for HEV. When healthy controls were age-matched with HCC patients, the latter were significantly (P < 0.001) more often HCV seropositive (67%) than were the controls (30%). The seropositivity for HBV and HEV did not differ significantly in frequency between the two groups. The seropositivity for HCV was also significantly (P < 0.001) more often found in HCC patients (76%) than in BC patients (47%), with seroprevalences for HBV and HEV not differing significantly in these age-matched groups. In HBV-negative HCC and bladder cancer patients, seroprevalence for HCV was significantly (P = 0.002) higher in HCC patients (68%) than in bladder cancer patients (36%). This difference was even more pronounced (P < 0.001) in HBV-positive HCC and bladder cancer patients (78% versus 52%, respectively). Of HCV-seropositive individuals, 49% were HCV RNA positive by branched DNA assay, and of these, 96% were infected by HCV genotype 4. No correlation between HCV RNA load and seropositivity of HBV or age or disease state was found. Infection with HCV and HCV-HBV double infection, but not HBV or HEV infection alone, is strongly correlated with HCC in Egypt.

Yasmine H. Ahmed, Huda O. AbuBakr, I. A. Z. S. O. A. M. &, "Histopathological, Immunohistochemical, And Molecular Alterations In Brain Tissue And Submandibular Salivary Gland Of Atrazine-Induced Toxicity In Male Rats", Environmental Science and Pollution Research, vol. 29, pp. 30697–30711, 2022.
YAMANY, A. B. E. E. R. S., F. Abdel-Ghaffar, S. A. Quraishy, O. Al-Amri, H. Mehlhorn, and R. Abdel-Gaber, "Histological technique to detect the physiological age of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles pharoensis (Diptera: Culicidae)", Microscopy Research and Technique, vol. 85, issue (4), pp. 1580–1587, 2021.
Y, M., and H. M. Onsi, "Human age estimation framework using different facial parts", Egyptian Informatics Journal, vol. 12, issue 1, 12, 2011. cu_pdf.pdf
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