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Journal Article
K.M., M., S. F.K., S. S.S., S. K.F., and K. M.G., "Hypothermic effect of ethanol in mice selected for differential sleep-time response to pentobarbital.", Pharmacol Biochem Behav., vol. 51, issue 2-3, pp. 525-8., 1995. Abstract
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MASHALY, M. A. G. D. I. M., S. A. N. D. R. A. L. YOUTZ, and R. F. Wideman, "Hypothyroidism and Antibody Prodction in Immature Male Chickens", Immunological Investigations, vol. 12, issue 6: Informa UK Ltd UK, pp. 551-563, 1983. Abstract
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Zamzam, S. M., H. M. Abdelkader, G. Subedi, and O. A. Alhossainy, "Hypovitaminosis D and its relationship to nasal polyposis", Pan Arab Journal of Rhinology, 2022.
Sareen, N., E. Abu-El-Rub, H. I. Ammar, Weiang Yan, G. L. Sequiera, A. M. Shams Eldeen, M. Moudgil, Rimpy Dhingra, H. S. Shokry, L. A. Rashed, et al., "Hypoxia-induced downregulation of cyclooxygenase 2 leads to the loss of immunoprivilege of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells.", FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, vol. 34, issue 11, pp. 15236-15251, 2020. Abstract

Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from young and healthy donors are reported to hold the potential to treat several immunological and degenerative disorders. However, recent data from animal studies and clinical trials demonstrate that immunogenicity and poor survival of transplanted MSCs impaired the efficacy of cells for regenerative applications. It is reported that initially immunoprivileged under in vitro conditions, MSCs are targeted by the host immune system after transplantation in the ischemic tissues in vivo. We performed in vitro (in MSCs) and in vivo (in the rat model of myocardial infarction [MI]) studies to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the change in the immunophenotype of MSCs from immunoprivileged to immunogenic under ischemic conditions. We have recently reported that a soluble factor prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) preserves the immunoprivilege of allogeneic MSCs. In the current study, we found that PGE2 levels, which were elevated during normoxia, decreased in MSCs following exposure to hypoxia. Further, we found that proteasome-mediated degradation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2, rate-limiting enzyme in PGE2 biosynthesis) in hypoxic MSCs is responsible for PGE2 decrease and loss of immunoprivilege of MSCs. While investigating the mechanisms of COX2 degradation in hypoxic MSCs, we found that in normoxic MSCs, COP9 signalosome subunit 5 (CSN5) binds to COX2 and prevents its degradation by the proteasome. However, exposure to hypoxia leads to a decrease in CSN5 levels and its binding to COX2, rendering COX2 protein susceptible to proteasome-mediated degradation. This subsequently causes PGE2 downregulation and loss of immunoprivilege of MSCs. Maintaining COX2 levels in MSCs preserves immunoprivilege in vitro and improves the survival of transplanted MSCs in a rat model of MI. These data provide novel mechanistic evidence that PGE2 is downregulated in hypoxic MSCs which is responsible for the post-transplantation rejection of allogeneic MSCs. Therefore, our data suggest that the new strategies that target CSN5-COX2 signaling may improve survival and utility of transplanted allogeneic MSCs in the ischemic heart.

Abu-El-Rub, E., N. Sareen, G. L. Sequiera, H. I. Ammar, Weiang Yan, A. M. Shams Eldeen, I. Rubinchik, M. Moudgil, H. S. Shokry, L. A. Rashed, et al., "Hypoxia-induced increase in Sug1 leads to poor post-transplantation survival of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells.", FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, vol. 34, issue 9, pp. 12860-12876, 2020. Abstract

Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from young and healthy donors are immunoprivileged and have the potential to treat numerous degenerative diseases. However, recent reviews of clinical trials report poor long-term survival of transplanted cells in the recipient that turned down the enthusiasm regarding MSC therapies. Increasing evidence now confirm that though initially immunoprivileged, MSCs eventually become immunogenic after transplantation in the ischemic or hypoxic environment of diseased tissues and are rejected by the host immune system. We performed in vitro (in rat and human cells) and in vivo (in a rat model) investigations to understand the mechanisms of the immune switch in the phenotype of MSCs. The immunoprivilege of MSCs is preserved by the absence of cell surface immune antigen, major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) molecule. We found that the ATPase subunit of 19S proteasome "Sug1" regulates MHC-II biosynthesis in MSCs. Exposure to hypoxia upregulates Sug1 in MSCs and its binding to class II transactivator (CIITA), a coactivator of MHC-II transcription. Sug1 binding to CIITA in hypoxic MSCs promotes the acetylation and K63 ubiquitination of CIITA leading to its activation and translocation to the nucleus, and ultimately MHC-II upregulation. In both rat and human MSCs, knocking down Sug1 inactivated MHC-II and preserved immunoprivilege even following hypoxia. In a rat model of myocardial infarction, transplantation of Sug1-knockdown MSCs in ischemic heart preserved immunoprivilege and improved the survival of transplanted cells. Therefore, the current study provides novel mechanisms of post-transplantation loss of immunoprivilege of MSCs. This study may help in facilitating better planning for future clinical trials.

AbdelMassih, A., E. Yacoub, R. J. Husseiny, A. Kamel, R. Hozaien, M. El Shershaby, M. Rajab, S. Yacoub, M. A. Eid, M. Elahmady, et al., "Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF): The link between obesity and COVID-19.", Obesity medicine, vol. 22, pp. 100317, 2021. Abstract

The COVID-19 death toll has involved to date more than 1 million confirmed deaths. The death rate is even higher in the obese COVID-19 patients, as a result of hypoxia, due to the interplay between adipose tissue hypoxia and obstructive sleep apnea. The discrepancy of manifestations seen in COVID-19 seems to be mediated by a differential immune response rather than a differential viral load. One of the key players of the immune response is HIF. HIF-1β is a stable constitutively expressed protein in the nucleus; and under hypoxic changes, its activity is unaffected, whereas the HIF-α subunit has a short half-life and because of its degradation by an enzyme known as propyl hydroxylase; under hypoxic conditions, propyl hydroxylase gets deactivated thus leading to the stabilization of HIF-1α. As mentioned before, HIF-1α expression is triggered by hypoxic states, this crippling condition will aggravate the pro-inflammatory characteristics of HIF-1α. The vast majority of decompensated COVID19 cases manifest with drastic lung injury and severe viral pneumonia, the infection-induced hypoxia will the existing hypoxia in obesity. This will additionally augment HIF-1α levels that will provoke the already existing cytokines' storm to fulminant. Consequently, this will directly correlate the effect of a hypoxic environment with the increase of HIF-1α level. HIFɑ exists in two main isoforms HIF-1α and HIF-2α. HIF-1α and HIF-2α act in distinct ways in how they work on different target genes. For example, HIF-2α may act on hemopoietin genes (heme-regulating genes); while HIF-1α acts on EPO. HIF-1α release seems to be markedly augmented in obesity due to adipose tissue hypoxia and obstructive sleep apnea resulting in cyclic hypoxia. HIF-1α can also be secreted by direct viral proteolytic effects. Whereas, HIF-2α is stimulated by chronic hypoxia. HIF-1α exerts detrimental effects on the immune system, characterized by unopposed pro-inflammation at the macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and complement levels resulting in cytokines' storm, which is linked to the poor outcomes of COVID-19. On the other hand, HIF-2α role is regulatory and largely opposes the actions mediated by HIF-1α. In view of this, inhibiting HIF-1α release or switching its production to HIF-2α by natural products such as resveratrol or by synthetic drugs, offer a good therapeutic strategy that can prevent COVID-19 worst outcome in infected patients. The approach of breaking the vicious circle between lung damage-induced hypoxia and HIF-1α pro-inflammatory stimulant through drugs is considered to be extremely promising as a therapeutic manner to combat further deterioration of COVID19 cases.

KANDIL, E. S. R. A. A. A., R. H. Sayed, L. A. Ahmed, M. A. Abd El Fattah, and B. M. El-Sayeh, "Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and nuclear-related receptor 1 as targets for neuroprotection by albendazole in a rat rotenone model of Parkinson's disease.", Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology, vol. 46, issue 12, pp. 1141-1150, 2019. Abstract

Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and nuclear receptor related-1 (Nurr1) play pivotal roles in the development and survival of dopaminergic neurons, and deficiencies in these genes may be involved in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. Recently, anthelminthic benzimidazoles were shown to promote HIF-1α transcription in vitro and were proposed to activate Nurr1 via their benzimidazole group. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the neuroprotective effects of albendazole (ABZ), an anthelminthic benzimidazole, in a rotenone model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rotenone (1.5 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected into rats every other day for a period of 21 days, resulting in the development of the essential features of PD. In addition to rotenone, ABZ (10 mg/kg) was administered orally starting from the 11th day. Treatment of rats with ABZ markedly mitigated rotenone-induced histological alterations in substantia nigra (SN), restored striatal dopamine (DA) level and motor functions and decreased the expression of α-synuclein (a disease marker protein). ABZ also enhanced expression of Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in the SN along with its downstream target, vascular endothelial growth factor, promoting neuronal survival. Similarly, ABZ augmented nuclear receptor related-1 (Nurr1) expression in the SN and increased transcriptional activation of Nurr1-controlled genes, which are essential for regulation of DA synthesis; additionally, expression of neurotoxic proinflammatory cytokines that induce neuronal death was suppressed. In conclusion, the present study suggests that ABZ exerts a neuroprotective effect in a rotenone-induced PD model associated with HIF-1α and Nurr1 activation and thus may be a viable candidate for treating PD.

KANDIL, E. S. R. A. A. A., R. H. Sayed, L. A. Ahmed, M. A. Abd El Fattah, and B. M. El-Sayeh, "Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and nuclear-related receptor 1 as targets for neuroprotection by albendazole in a rat rotenone model of Parkinson's disease.", Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology, vol. 46, issue 12, pp. 1141-1150, 2019. Abstract

Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and nuclear receptor related-1 (Nurr1) play pivotal roles in the development and survival of dopaminergic neurons, and deficiencies in these genes may be involved in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. Recently, anthelminthic benzimidazoles were shown to promote HIF-1α transcription in vitro and were proposed to activate Nurr1 via their benzimidazole group. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the neuroprotective effects of albendazole (ABZ), an anthelminthic benzimidazole, in a rotenone model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rotenone (1.5 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected into rats every other day for a period of 21 days, resulting in the development of the essential features of PD. In addition to rotenone, ABZ (10 mg/kg) was administered orally starting from the 11th day. Treatment of rats with ABZ markedly mitigated rotenone-induced histological alterations in substantia nigra (SN), restored striatal dopamine (DA) level and motor functions and decreased the expression of α-synuclein (a disease marker protein). ABZ also enhanced expression of Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in the SN along with its downstream target, vascular endothelial growth factor, promoting neuronal survival. Similarly, ABZ augmented nuclear receptor related-1 (Nurr1) expression in the SN and increased transcriptional activation of Nurr1-controlled genes, which are essential for regulation of DA synthesis; additionally, expression of neurotoxic proinflammatory cytokines that induce neuronal death was suppressed. In conclusion, the present study suggests that ABZ exerts a neuroprotective effect in a rotenone-induced PD model associated with HIF-1α and Nurr1 activation and thus may be a viable candidate for treating PD.

Abd ElAziz, A. M., H. S. Abdel Hamid, R. R. Mostafa, and Y. R. A. Shalaby, "Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in colorectal carcinoma", Egypation Journal of Pathology, vol. 38, issue 1, pp. 18–21, 2018.
Dhingra, S., N. Sareen, Ejlal Abu‐El‐Rub, Hania I. Ammar, Weiang Yan, G. L. Sequiera, Asmaa M. ShamsEldeen, M. Moudgil, Rimpy Dhingra, Heba S. Shokry, et al., "Hypoxia‐induced downregulation of cyclooxygenase 2 leads to the loss of immunoprivilege of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells", The FASEB Journal, 2020.
Abu‐El‐Rub Ejlal, Sareen Niketa, Lester Sequiera Glen, I. Ammar Hania, Yan Weiang, M. ShamsEldeen Asmaa, Rubinchik Ilan, Moudgil Meenal, S. Shokry Heba, A. Rashed Laila, et al., "Hypoxia‐induced increase in Sug1 leads to poor post‐transplantation survival of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells", The FASEB Journal, 2020.
El-Kady, H., O. Amer, A. H. Ali, and H. Haggag, "Hysteretic Performance of Hybrid GFRP-Steel Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls: An Experimental Investigation", Journal of Cement Based Composites, vol. 3, issue 4, pp. 1-9, 2022.
A.L.Aboul-Nasr, "Hysteroscopic endometrial ablation. ", Middle East Fertil Soc. J. , vol. 2, issue 3, pp. 185-194, 1997.
A.L.Aboul-Nasr, S.M.Thabet, H.G.Al-Inany, and M.Aboulghar, "Hysteroscopic evaluation of the uterine cavity following surgical evacuation. ", Middle East Fertil. Soc. J. , vol. 3, issue 2, pp. 137-144, 1998.
A.L.Aboul-Nasr, R.A.Ezzat, A. El-Hennawy, E.Fateen, N. Abdel-Kader, and S.S.Hassan, "Hysteroscopic localization of intrauterine devices in cases with uterine bleeding. ", Med. J. Cairo Univ. , vol. 64, issue 2, pp. 365-376, 1996.
Meshaal, H., E. Salah, E. Fawzi, M. Abdel-Rasheed, A. Maged, and H. Saad, "Hysteroscopic management versus ultrasound‑guided evacuation for women with first‑trimester pregnancy loss, a randomised controlled trial", BMC women health, vol. 22, issue 190, 2022.
A.L.Aboul-Nasr, H. G. Al-Inany, and S.M.Thabet, "Hysteroscopic metroplasty in recurrent aborters and infertile patients.", Egypt. J. Fertil. Steril. , vol. 4, issue 1, pp. 55-58, 2000.
Zayed, M., U. M. Fouda, S. M. Zayed, K. A. Elsetohy, and A. T. Hashem, "Hysteroscopic Myomectomy of Large Submucous Myomas in a 1-Step Procedure Using Multiple Slicing Sessions Technique", Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology,, vol. 22, issue 7, pp. 1196-1202, 2015. hysteroscopic_myomectomy_of_large_submucous_myomas_in_a_1-step_procedure_using_multiple_slicing_sessions_technique.pdf
Zayed, M., U. M. Fouda, S. M. Zayed, K. A. Elsetohy, and A. T. Hashem, "Hysteroscopic Myomectomy of Large Submucous Myomas in a 1-Step Procedure Using Multiple Slicing Sessions Technique.", J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2015, vol. 22, issue 7, pp. 1196-202, 2015.
Abulghar, M., A. Nada, O. Azmy, and O. Shawky, "Hysteroscopic Tubal Electrocoagulation In Cases With Communicating Hydrosalpinx And Planning For IVF- A Pilot Study", The International Medical Journal , 2008.
Magazine Article
Aboudina, A., I. Kamel, M. Elshenawy, H. Abdelgawad, and B. Abdulhai, "Harnessing the Power of HPC in Simulation and Optimization of Large Transportation Networks: Spatio-Temporal Traffic Management in the Greater Toronto Area", IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Magazine, vol. 10, issue 1, pp. 95-106, 2018.
Galal-Edeen, A. G. H., M. Y., Elgarf, and H. M. Hassan, "HCI of Arabia: the challenges of HCI research in Egypt", Interactions, vol. 26, issue 3, pp. 55–59, 2019.
Tourism