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2022
Elserty, N., S. M. Abdelmageed, D. I. N. A. O. T. H. M. A. N. S. H. O. K. R. I. MORSIGALAL, E. M. A. N. WAGDY, and undefined, "Carry over effect of different cervical mobilization techniques on shoulder muscle strength in rotator cuff tendinitis patients: A randomized control trial", Polska, issue 3, 2022.
Putman, M., K. Kennedy, E. Sirotich, J. W. Liew, S. E. Sattui, T. T. Moni, A. A. Akpabio, D. Alpizar-Rodriguez, S. Angevare, R. P. Beesley, et al., "COVID-19 vaccine perceptions and uptake: results from the COVID-19 Global Rheumatology Alliance Vaccine Survey.", The Lancet. Rheumatology, vol. 4, issue 4, pp. e237-e240, 2022.
Javed, R., T. Usman, S. Niaz, N. Ali, H. Baneh, K. Ullah, I. Khattak, M. Kamal, S. Bahadar, N. U. Khan, et al., "Effects of Genetic and Environmental Factors on Mastitis and Performance Traits in Various Breeds of Dairy Cattle Maintained at Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan", Pakistan Journal of Zoology, 2022. Abstract

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Ahmad, M., M. T. Qureshi, W. Rehman, N. H. Alotaibi, A. Gul, R. A. S. Hameed, M. Al Elaimi, M. F. H. Abd El-kader, M. Nawaz, and R. Ullah, "Enhanced photocatalytic degradation of RhB dye from aqueous solution by biogenic catalyst Ag@ ZnO", Journal of Alloys and Compounds, vol. 895: Elsevier, pp. 162636, 2022. Abstract
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Méndez-Sánchez, N., E. Bugianesi, R. G. Gish, F. Lammert, H. Tilg, M. H. Nguyen, S. K. Sarin, N. Fabrellas, S. Zelber-Sagi, J. - G. Fan, et al., "Global multi-stakeholder endorsement of the MAFLD definition.", The lancet. Gastroenterology & hepatology, vol. 7, issue 5, pp. 388-390, 2022.
van Unen, V., L. F. Ouboter, N. Ali, M. Schreurs, T. Abdelaal, Y. Kooy-Winkelaar, G. Beyrend, T. Höllt, J. P. W. Maljaars, L. M. Mearin, et al., "Identification of a Disease-Associated Network of Intestinal Immune Cells in Treatment-Naive Inflammatory Bowel Disease.", Frontiers in immunology, vol. 13, pp. 893803, 2022. Abstract

Chronic intestinal inflammation underlies inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Previous studies indicated alterations in the cellular immune system; however, it has been challenging to interrogate the role of all immune cell subsets simultaneously. Therefore, we aimed to identify immune cell types associated with inflammation in IBD using high-dimensional mass cytometry. We analyzed 188 intestinal biopsies and paired blood samples of newly-diagnosed, treatment-naive patients (=42) and controls (=26) in two independent cohorts. We applied mass cytometry (36-antibody panel) to resolve single cells and analyzed the data with unbiased Hierarchical-SNE. In addition, imaging-mass cytometry (IMC) was performed to reveal the spatial distribution of the immune subsets in the tissue. We identified 44 distinct immune subsets. Correlation network analysis identified a network of inflammation-associated subsets, including HLA-DRCD38 EM CD4 T cells, T regulatory-like cells, PD1 EM CD8 T cells, neutrophils, CD27 TCRγδ cells and NK cells. All disease-associated subsets were validated in a second cohort. This network was abundant in a subset of patients, independent of IBD subtype, severity or intestinal location. Putative disease-associated CD4 T cells were detectable in blood. Finally, imaging-mass cytometry revealed the spatial colocalization of neutrophils, memory CD4 T cells and myeloid cells in the inflamed intestine. Our study indicates that a cellular network of both innate and adaptive immune cells colocalizes in inflamed biopsies from a subset of patients. These results contribute to dissecting disease heterogeneity and may guide the development of targeted therapeutics in IBD.

Ahmad, I., M. Ullah, M. Alkafafy, N. Ahmed, S. F. Mahmoud, K. Sohail, H. Ullah, W. M. Ghoneem, M. M. Ahmed, and S. Sayed, "Identification of the economics, composition, and supplementation of maggot meal in broiler production.", Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences, vol. 29, issue 6, pp. 103277, 2022. ahmad_et_al_2022_sjbs_29_6_103277.pdf
on Collaborative, G. H. R. G. C. ’s N. - C. D., "Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with paediatric cancer in low-income, middle-income and high-income countries: a multicentre, international, observational cohort study", BMJ Open, vol. 12, no. 4: British Medical Journal Publishing Group, 2022. AbstractWebsite

Objectives Paediatric cancer is a leading cause of death for children. Children in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) were four times more likely to die than children in high-income countries (HICs). This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the COVID-19 pandemic had affected the delivery of healthcare services worldwide, and exacerbated the disparity in paediatric cancer outcomes between LMICs and HICs.Design A multicentre, international, collaborative cohort study.Setting 91 hospitals and cancer centres in 39 countries providing cancer treatment to paediatric patients between March and December 2020.Participants Patients were included if they were under the age of 18 years, and newly diagnosed with or undergoing active cancer treatment for Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, Wilms’ tumour, sarcoma, retinoblastoma, gliomas, medulloblastomas or neuroblastomas, in keeping with the WHO Global Initiative for Childhood Cancer.Main outcome measure All-cause mortality at 30 days and 90 days.Results 1660 patients were recruited. 219 children had changes to their treatment due to the pandemic. Patients in LMICs were primarily affected (n=182/219, 83.1%). Relative to patients with paediatric cancer in HICs, patients with paediatric cancer in LMICs had 12.1 (95% CI 2.93 to 50.3) and 7.9 (95% CI 3.2 to 19.7) times the odds of death at 30 days and 90 days, respectively, after presentation during the COVID-19 pandemic (p<0.001). After adjusting for confounders, patients with paediatric cancer in LMICs had 15.6 (95% CI 3.7 to 65.8) times the odds of death at 30 days (p<0.001).Conclusions The COVID-19 pandemic has affected paediatric oncology service provision. It has disproportionately affected patients in LMICs, highlighting and compounding existing disparities in healthcare systems globally that need addressing urgently. However, many patients with paediatric cancer continued to receive their normal standard of care. This speaks to the adaptability and resilience of healthcare systems and healthcare workers globally.Data are available on reasonable request. Deidentified date will be shared on request.

, Jouini R, "Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with paediatric cancer in low-income, middle-income and high-income countries: a multicentre, international, observational cohort study", BMJ Open, vol. 12, no. 4: British Medical Journal Publishing Group, 2022. AbstractWebsite

Objectives Paediatric cancer is a leading cause of death for children. Children in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) were four times more likely to die than children in high-income countries (HICs). This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the COVID-19 pandemic had affected the delivery of healthcare services worldwide, and exacerbated the disparity in paediatric cancer outcomes between LMICs and HICs.Design A multicentre, international, collaborative cohort study.Setting 91 hospitals and cancer centres in 39 countries providing cancer treatment to paediatric patients between March and December 2020.Participants Patients were included if they were under the age of 18 years, and newly diagnosed with or undergoing active cancer treatment for Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, Wilms’ tumour, sarcoma, retinoblastoma, gliomas, medulloblastomas or neuroblastomas, in keeping with the WHO Global Initiative for Childhood Cancer.Main outcome measure All-cause mortality at 30 days and 90 days.Results 1660 patients were recruited. 219 children had changes to their treatment due to the pandemic. Patients in LMICs were primarily affected (n=182/219, 83.1%). Relative to patients with paediatric cancer in HICs, patients with paediatric cancer in LMICs had 12.1 (95% CI 2.93 to 50.3) and 7.9 (95% CI 3.2 to 19.7) times the odds of death at 30 days and 90 days, respectively, after presentation during the COVID-19 pandemic (p<0.001). After adjusting for confounders, patients with paediatric cancer in LMICs had 15.6 (95% CI 3.7 to 65.8) times the odds of death at 30 days (p<0.001).Conclusions The COVID-19 pandemic has affected paediatric oncology service provision. It has disproportionately affected patients in LMICs, highlighting and compounding existing disparities in healthcare systems globally that need addressing urgently. However, many patients with paediatric cancer continued to receive their normal standard of care. This speaks to the adaptability and resilience of healthcare systems and healthcare workers globally.Data are available on reasonable request. Deidentified date will be shared on request.

Ali, J., I. Jan, H. Ullah, N. Ahmed, M. Alam, R. Ullah, M. El-Sharnouby, H. Kesba, M. Shukry, Samy Sayed, et al., "Influence of Ascophyllum nodosum Extract Foliar Spray on the Physiological and Biochemical Attributes of Okra under Drought Stress", Plants, vol. 11, issue 790, 2022. plants-11-00790.pdf
U, A., A. SI, A. SS, H. M, R. A, R. M, Y. M, B. MQ, B. SA, and R. MA, "Influence of Phytase with Or without Organic Acid (Sodium Di-Formate) Supplementation on Growth Performance, Carcass Response, Protein and Mineral Digestibility in Starter Phase of Broilers", Brazilian Journal of Poultry Science, vol. 24, issue 1, pp. 01-10, 2022. brazilian.pdf
Ullah, S., J. Akbar, M. T. Qureshi, M. Al Elaimi, A. M. F. H. El-kader, M. Usman, and B. A. Bacha, "Laguerre fields strength and beam waist-dependent superluminal propagation of light pulse in atomic medium", European Physical Journal Plus, vol. 137, issue 8, pp. 963, 2022.
Mandour, A. S., H. Samir, T. Yoshida, K. Matsuura, L. Hamabe, K. Shimada, H. A. Abdelmageed, M. Elbadawy, A. Uemura, K. Takahashi, et al., "Novel color M-mode echocardiography for non-invasive assessment of the intraventricular pressure in goats: Feasibility, repeatability, and the effect of sedation", Frontiers in Veterinary Science, vol. 2022, issue 9, pp. 935437, 2022.
Usama, M., F. Abdelaziem, W. Rashed, E. Maher, M. E. Beltagy, and W. Zekri, "OTHR-24. Impact of physical activity on postural stability and coordination in children with posterior fossa tumor: randomized control phase III trial", Neuro-Oncology, vol. 24, issue Issue Supplement_1, pp. i152, 2022.
Kalantar-Zadeh, K., M. B. Lockwood, C. M. Rhee, E. Tantisattamo, S. Andreoli, A. Balducci, P. Laffin, T. Harris, R. Knight, L. Kumaraswami, et al., "Patient-centred approaches for the management of unpleasant symptoms in kidney disease.", Nature reviews. Nephrology, 2022. Abstract

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) frequently experience unpleasant symptoms. These can be gastrointestinal (constipation, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea), psychological (anxiety and sadness), neurological (lightheadedness, headache and numbness), cardiopulmonary (shortness of breath and oedema), dermatological (pruritus and dry skin), painful (muscle cramps, chest pain and abdominal pain) or involve sexual dysfunction, sleep disorders and fatigue. These symptoms often occur in clusters, with one of them as the lead symptom and others as secondary symptoms. Uraemic toxins (also called uremic toxins) are often considered to be the main cause of CKD-associated symptom burden, but treatment of uraemia by dialysis often fails to resolve them and can engender additional symptoms. Indeed, symptoms can be exacerbated by comorbid conditions, pharmacotherapies, lifestyle and dietary regimens, kidney replacement therapy and ageing. Patients with kidney disease, including those who depend on dialysis or transplantation, should feel actively supported in their symptom management through the identification and targeting of unpleasant symptoms via a tailored palliative care approach. Such an approach may help minimize the burden and consequences of kidney disease, and lead to improved patient outcomes including health-related quality of life and better life participation.

Mbekeani, J. N., M. Abdel Fattah, A. Ul Haq, E. Al Shail, and M. Ahmed, "Pediatric pilomyxoid astrocytoma - ophthalmic and neuroradiologic manifestations.", European journal of ophthalmology, vol. 32, issue 5, pp. 2604-2614, 2022.
Tijjani, H., A. P. Adegunloye, A. Uba, J. O. Adebayo, G. A. Gyebi, and I. M. Ibrahim, "Pharmacoinformatic study of inhibitory potentials of selected flavonoids against papain-like protease and 3-chymotrypsin-like protease of SARS-CoV-2", Clinical Phytoscience, vol. 8, issue 16, 2022.
Al-Naseri, A., S. Al-Absi, N. Mahana, H. Tallima, and undefined, "Protective immune potential of multiple antigenic peptide (MAP) constructs comprising peptides that are shared by several cysteine peptidases against Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice", Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology , vol. 248, issue 111459, pp. 1-10, 2022.
D, J., T. H.S, H. W, B. U, E. N. M., A. K, S. O, Y. A, D. A.A, E. - S. H.E, et al., "SARS-CoV-2 genome variations and evolution patterns in Egypt: a multi-center study", Scientific Reports, vol. 12, issue 1, pp. 14511, 2022.
Gallenti, R., H. E. Hussein, H. F. Alzan, C. E. Suarez, M. ueti, S. Asurmendi, D. Benitez, F. R. Araujo, and P. Rolls, Unraveling the Complexity of the Rhomboid Serine Protease 4 Family of Babesia bovis Using Bioinformatics and Experimental Studies, , 2022.
2021
Akowuah, E., R. A. Benson, E. J. Caruana, G. Chetty, J. Edwards, S. Forlani, G. Gradinariu, G. J. Murphy, A. Y. Oo, A. J. Patel, et al., "Early outcomes and complications following cardiac surgery in patients testing positive for coronavirus disease 2019: An international cohort study", The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular SurgeryThe Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 162, issue 2: Elsevier, pp. e355 - e372, 2021. AbstractWebsite
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Glasbey, J., A. Ademuyiwa, A. Adisa, E. Alameer, A. P. Arnaud, F. Ayasra, J. Azevedo, A. Minaya-Bravo, A. Costas-Chavarri, J. Edwards, et al., "Effect of COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns on planned cancer surgery for 15 tumour types in 61 countries: an international, prospective, cohort study", The Lancet OncologyThe Lancet Oncology, vol. 22, issue 11: Elsevier, pp. 1507 - 1517, 2021. AbstractWebsite
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Biccard, B. M., L. du Toit, M. Lesosky, T. Stephens, L. Myer, A. B. A. Prempeh, N. Vickery, H. - L. Kluyts, A. Torborg, A. Omigbodun, et al., Enhanced postoperative surveillance versus standard of care to reduce mortality among adult surgical patients in Africa (ASOS-2): a cluster-randomised controlled trial, , vol. 9, issue 10, pp. e1391 - e1401, 2021. AbstractWebsite

SummaryBackground
Risk of mortality following surgery in patients across Africa is twice as high as the global average. Most of these deaths occur on hospital wards after the surgery itself. We aimed to assess whether enhanced postoperative surveillance of adult surgical patients at high risk of postoperative morbidity or mortality in Africa could reduce 30-day in-hospital mortality.
Methods
We did a two-arm, open-label, cluster-randomised trial of hospitals (clusters) across Africa. Hospitals were eligible if they provided surgery with an overnight postoperative admission. Hospitals were randomly assigned through minimisation in recruitment blocks (1:1) to provide patients with either a package of enhanced postoperative surveillance interventions (admitting the patient to higher care ward, increasing the frequency of postoperative nursing observations, assigning the patient to a bed in view of the nursing station, allowing family members to stay in the ward, and placing a postoperative surveillance guide at the bedside) for those at high risk (ie, with African Surgical Outcomes Study Surgical Risk Calculator scores ≥10) and usual care for those at low risk (intervention group), or for all patients to receive usual postoperative care (control group). Health-care providers and participants were not masked, but data assessors were. The primary outcome was 30-day in-hospital mortality of patients at low and high risk, measured at the participant level. All analyses were done as allocated (by cluster) in all patients with available data. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03853824.
Findings
Between May 3, 2019, and July 27, 2020, 594 eligible hospitals indicated a desire to participate across 33 African countries; 332 (56%) were able to recruit participants and were included in analyses. We allocated 160 hospitals (13 275 patients) to provide enhanced postoperative surveillance and 172 hospitals (15 617 patients) to provide standard care. The mean age of participants was 37·1 years (SD 15·5) and 20 039 (69·4%) of 28 892 patients were women. 30-day in-hospital mortality occurred in 169 (1·3%) of 12 970 patients with mortality data in the intervention group and in 193 (1·3%) of 15 242 patients with mortality data in the control group (relative risk 0·96, 95% CI 0·69–1·33; p=0·79). 45 (0·2%) of 22 031 patients at low risk and 309 (5·6%) of 5500 patients at high risk died. No harms associated with either intervention were reported.
Interpretation
This intervention package did not decrease 30-day in-hospital mortality among surgical patients in Africa at high risk of postoperative morbidity or mortality. Further research is needed to develop interventions that prevent death from surgical complications in resource-limited hospitals across Africa.
Funding
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists.
Translations
For the Arabic, French and Portuguese translations of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.

Wright, N. J., A. J. M. Leather, N. Ade-Ajayi, N. Sevdalis, J. Davies, D. Poenaru, E. Ameh, A. Ademuyiwa, K. Lakhoo, E. R. Smith, et al., Mortality from gastrointestinal congenital anomalies at 264 hospitals in 74 low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries: a multicentre, international, prospective cohort study, , vol. 398, issue 10297, pp. 325 - 339, 2021. AbstractWebsite

SummaryBackground
Congenital anomalies are the fifth leading cause of mortality in children younger than 5 years globally. Many gastrointestinal congenital anomalies are fatal without timely access to neonatal surgical care, but few studies have been done on these conditions in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). We compared outcomes of the seven most common gastrointestinal congenital anomalies in low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries globally, and identified factors associated with mortality.
Methods
We did a multicentre, international prospective cohort study of patients younger than 16 years, presenting to hospital for the first time with oesophageal atresia, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, intestinal atresia, gastroschisis, exomphalos, anorectal malformation, and Hirschsprung's disease. Recruitment was of consecutive patients for a minimum of 1 month between October, 2018, and April, 2019. We collected data on patient demographics, clinical status, interventions, and outcomes using the REDCap platform. Patients were followed up for 30 days after primary intervention, or 30 days after admission if they did not receive an intervention. The primary outcome was all-cause, in-hospital mortality for all conditions combined and each condition individually, stratified by country income status. We did a complete case analysis.
Findings
We included 3849 patients with 3975 study conditions (560 with oesophageal atresia, 448 with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, 681 with intestinal atresia, 453 with gastroschisis, 325 with exomphalos, 991 with anorectal malformation, and 517 with Hirschsprung's disease) from 264 hospitals (89 in high-income countries, 166 in middle-income countries, and nine in low-income countries) in 74 countries. Of the 3849 patients, 2231 (58·0%) were male. Median gestational age at birth was 38 weeks (IQR 36–39) and median bodyweight at presentation was 2·8 kg (2·3–3·3). Mortality among all patients was 37 (39·8%) of 93 in low-income countries, 583 (20·4%) of 2860 in middle-income countries, and 50 (5·6%) of 896 in high-income countries (p<0·0001 between all country income groups). Gastroschisis had the greatest difference in mortality between country income strata (nine [90·0%] of ten in low-income countries, 97 [31·9%] of 304 in middle-income countries, and two [1·4%] of 139 in high-income countries; p≤0·0001 between all country income groups). Factors significantly associated with higher mortality for all patients combined included country income status (low-income vs high-income countries, risk ratio 2·78 [95% CI 1·88–4·11], p<0·0001; middle-income vs high-income countries, 2·11 [1·59–2·79], p<0·0001), sepsis at presentation (1·20 [1·04–1·40], p=0·016), higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score at primary intervention (ASA 4–5 vs ASA 1–2, 1·82 [1·40–2·35], p<0·0001; ASA 3 vs ASA 1–2, 1·58, [1·30–1·92], p<0·0001]), surgical safety checklist not used (1·39 [1·02–1·90], p=0·035), and ventilation or parenteral nutrition unavailable when needed (ventilation 1·96, [1·41–2·71], p=0·0001; parenteral nutrition 1·35, [1·05–1·74], p=0·018). Administration of parenteral nutrition (0·61, [0·47–0·79], p=0·0002) and use of a peripherally inserted central catheter (0·65 [0·50–0·86], p=0·0024) or percutaneous central line (0·69 [0·48–1·00], p=0·049) were associated with lower mortality.
Interpretation
Unacceptable differences in mortality exist for gastrointestinal congenital anomalies between low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries. Improving access to quality neonatal surgical care in LMICs will be vital to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 3.2 of ending preventable deaths in neonates and children younger than 5 years by 2030.
Funding
Wellcome Trust.

Said, S. M., H. Salah, Usama Massoud, A. Ali, and A. Lethy, "Detection and Delineation of a buried Quarry by Integrating of Historical analysis of satellite images and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) at east Cairo, Egypt.", The Arab Conference on Astronomy and Geophysics 7th Assembly,, Cairo, Egypt, 11-14 October 20, 2021.
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