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Pereira, S., J. Lee, N. Rubio, H. A. F. M. Hassan, I. B. M. Suffian, J. T. W. Wang, R. Klippstein, B. Ballesteros, and K. T. Al-Jamal, "Cationic liposome-multi-walled carbon nanotubes hybrids for dual siPLK1 and doxorubicin delivery in vitro", Pharmaceutical research, vol. 32, issue 10: Springer, pp. 3293-3308, 2015. Abstract
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Penterling, C., G. A. Drexler, C. Böhland, R. Stamp, C. Wilke, H. Braselmann, R. B. Caldwell, J. Reindl, S. Girst, C. Greubel, et al., "Depletion of Histone Demethylase Jarid1A Resulting in Histone Hyperacetylation and Radiation Sensitivity Does Not Affect DNA Double-Strand Break Repair.", PloS one, vol. 11, issue 6, pp. e0156599, 2016. Abstract

Histone demethylases have recently gained interest as potential targets in cancer treatment and several histone demethylases have been implicated in the DNA damage response. We investigated the effects of siRNA-mediated depletion of histone demethylase Jarid1A (KDM5A, RBP2), which demethylates transcription activating tri- and dimethylated lysine 4 at histone H3 (H3K4me3/me2), on growth characteristics and cellular response to radiation in several cancer cell lines. In unirradiated cells Jarid1A depletion lead to histone hyperacetylation while not affecting cell growth. In irradiated cells, depletion of Jarid1A significantly increased cellular radiosensitivity. Unexpectedly, the hyperacetylation phenotype did not lead to disturbed accumulation of DNA damage response and repair factors 53BP1, BRCA1, or Rad51 at damage sites, nor did it influence resolution of radiation-induced foci or rejoining of reporter constructs. We conclude that the radiation sensitivity observed following depletion of Jarid1A is not caused by a deficiency in repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

Penterling, C., G. A. Drexler, C. Böhland, R. Stamp, C. Wilke, H. Braselmann, R. B. Caldwell, J. Reindl, S. Girst, C. Greubel, et al., "Depletion of Histone Demethylase Jarid1A Resulting in Histone Hyperacetylation and Radiation Sensitivity Does Not Affect DNA Double-Strand Break Repair.", PloS one, vol. 11, issue 6, pp. e0156599, 2016. Abstract

Histone demethylases have recently gained interest as potential targets in cancer treatment and several histone demethylases have been implicated in the DNA damage response. We investigated the effects of siRNA-mediated depletion of histone demethylase Jarid1A (KDM5A, RBP2), which demethylates transcription activating tri- and dimethylated lysine 4 at histone H3 (H3K4me3/me2), on growth characteristics and cellular response to radiation in several cancer cell lines. In unirradiated cells Jarid1A depletion lead to histone hyperacetylation while not affecting cell growth. In irradiated cells, depletion of Jarid1A significantly increased cellular radiosensitivity. Unexpectedly, the hyperacetylation phenotype did not lead to disturbed accumulation of DNA damage response and repair factors 53BP1, BRCA1, or Rad51 at damage sites, nor did it influence resolution of radiation-induced foci or rejoining of reporter constructs. We conclude that the radiation sensitivity observed following depletion of Jarid1A is not caused by a deficiency in repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

Pennell, D. J., J. B. Porter, M. D. Cappellini, A. El-Beshlawy, L. L. Chan, Y. Aydinok, M. S. Elalfy, P. Sutcharitchan, C. - K. Li, H. Ibrahim, et al., "Efficacy of deferasirox in reducing and preventing cardiac iron overload in beta-thalassemia.", Blood, vol. 115, issue 12, pp. 2364-71, 2010 Mar 25. Abstract

Cardiac iron overload causes most deaths in beta-thalassemia major. The efficacy of deferasirox in reducing or preventing cardiac iron overload was assessed in 192 patients with beta-thalassemia in a 1-year prospective, multicenter study. The cardiac iron reduction arm (n = 114) included patients with magnetic resonance myocardial T2* from 5 to 20 ms (indicating cardiac siderosis), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 56% or more, serum ferritin more than 2500 ng/mL, liver iron concentration more than 10 mg Fe/g dry weight, and more than 50 transfused blood units. The prevention arm (n = 78) included otherwise eligible patients whose myocardial T2* was 20 ms or more. The primary end point was the change in myocardial T2* at 1 year. In the cardiac iron reduction arm, the mean deferasirox dose was 32.6 mg/kg per day. Myocardial T2* (geometric mean +/- coefficient of variation) improved from a baseline of 11.2 ms (+/- 40.5%) to 12.9 ms (+/- 49.5%) (+16%; P < .001). LVEF (mean +/- SD) was unchanged: 67.4 (+/- 5.7%) to 67.0 (+/- 6.0%) (-0.3%; P = .53). In the prevention arm, baseline myocardial T2* was unchanged from baseline of 32.0 ms (+/- 25.6%) to 32.5 ms (+/- 25.1%) (+2%; P = .57) and LVEF increased from baseline 67.7 (+/- 4.7%) to 69.6 (+/- 4.5%) (+1.8%; P < .001). This prospective study shows that deferasirox is effective in removing and preventing myocardial iron accumulation. This study is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00171821.

Pennell, D. J., J. B. Porter, M. D. Cappellini, L. L. Chan, A. El-Beshlawy, Y. Aydinok, H. Ibrahim, C. - K. Li, V. Viprakasit, M. S. Elalfy, et al., "Continued improvement in myocardial T2* over two years of deferasirox therapy in β-thalassemia major patients with cardiac iron overload.", Haematologica, vol. 96, issue 1, pp. 48-54, 2011 Jan. Abstract

BACKGROUND: The efficacy of cardiac iron chelation in transfusion-dependent patients has been demonstrated in one-year prospective trials. Since normalization of cardiac T2* takes several years, the efficacy and safety of deferasirox was assessed for two years in patients with β-thalassemia major in the cardiac sub-study of the EPIC trial.

DESIGN AND METHODS: Eligible patients with myocardial T2* greater than 5 to less than 20 ms received deferasirox, with the primary endpoint being the change in T2* from baseline to two years.

RESULTS: Baseline myocardial T2* was severe (> 5 to < 10 ms) in 39 patients, and moderate-to-mild (10 to < 20 ms) in 62 patients. Mean deferasirox dose was 33.1 ± 3.7 mg/kg/d in the one-year core study increasing to 36.1 ± 7.7 mg/kg/d during the second year of treatment. Geometric mean myocardial T2* increased from a baseline of 11.2 to 14.8 ms at two years (P < 0.001). In patients with moderate-to-mild baseline T2*, an increase was seen from 14.7 to 20.1 ms, with normalization (≥ 20 ms) in 56.7% of patients. In those with severe cardiac iron overload at baseline, 42.9% improved to the moderate-to-mild group. The incidence of drug-related adverse events did not increase during the extension relative to the core study and included (≥ 5%) increased serum creatinine, rash and increased alanine aminotransferase.

CONCLUSIONS: Continuous treatment with deferasirox for two years with a target dose of 40 mg/kg/d continued to remove iron from the heart in patients with β-thalassemia major and mild, moderate and severe cardiac siderosis. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT 00171821).

Pennell, D. J., J. B. Porter, M. D. Cappellini, L. L. Chan, A. El-Beshlawy, Y. Aydinok, H. Ibrahim, C. - K. Li, V. Viprakasit, M. S. Elalfy, et al., "Deferasirox for up to 3 years leads to continued improvement of myocardial T2* in patients with β-thalassemia major.", Haematologica, vol. 97, issue 6, pp. 842-8, 2012 Jun. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Prospective data on cardiac iron removal are limited beyond one year and longer-term studies are, therefore, important.

DESIGN AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients in the EPIC cardiac substudy elected to continue into the 3(rd) year, allowing cardiac iron removal to be analyzed over three years.

RESULTS: Mean deferasirox dose during year 3 was 33.6 ± 9.8 mg/kg per day. Myocardial T2*, assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance, significantly increased from 12.0 ms ± 39.1% at baseline to 17.1 ms ± 62.0% at end of study (P<0.001), corresponding to a decrease in cardiac iron concentration (based on ad hoc analysis of T2*) from 2.43 ± 1.2 mg Fe/g dry weight (dw) at baseline to 1.80 ± 1.4 mg Fe/g dw at end of study (P<0.001). After three years, 68.1% of patients with baseline T2* 10 to <20 ms normalized (≥ 20 ms) and 50.0% of patients with baseline T2* >5 to <10 ms improved to 10 to <20 ms. There was no significant variation in left ventricular ejection fraction over the three years. No deaths occurred and the most common investigator-assessed drug-related adverse event in year 3 was increased serum creatinine (n = 9, 12.7%).

CONCLUSIONS: Three years of deferasirox treatment along with a clinically manageable safety profile significantly reduced cardiac iron overload versus baseline and normalized T2* in 68.1% (32 of 47) of patients with T2* 10 to <20 ms.

Pennell, D. J., J. B. Porter, M. D. Cappellini, L. L. Chan, A. El-Beshlawy, Y. Aydinok, H. Ibrahim, C. - K. Li, V. Viprakasit, M. S. Elalfy, et al., "Continued Improvement in Myocardial T2* Over Two Years of Deferasirox Therapy in ?-Thalassemia Major Patients with Cardiac Iron Overload", Haematologica, 2011. Abstractcu_pdf.pdf

Background: The efficacy of cardiac iron chelation in transfusion-dependent patients has been demonstrated in one-year prospective trials. Since normalization of cardiac T2* takes several years, the efficacy and safety of deferasirox was assessed for two years in patients with ?-thalassemia major in the cardiac sub-study of the EPIC trial.

Peng, J., J. - H. Mah, R. Somavat, H. M. H. Mohamed, S. Sastry, and J. Tang, "Thermal Inactivation Kinetics of Bacillus coagulans Spores in Tomato Juice", Journal of Food Protection, vol. 75, pp. 1236-1242, 2012.
Peng, J., A. E. - F. Abomohra, M. Elsayed, X. Zhang, Q. Fan, and P. Ai, "Compositional changes of rice straw fibers after pretreatment with diluted acetic acid: Towards enhanced biomethane production", Journal of Cleaner Production, vol. 230, issue 1 September 2019, pp. 775-782, 2019.
Peltier, S. J., Y. Kadah, S. M. LaConte, and X. Hu, Robust ICA analysis for model-free functional connectivity detection, , vol. 5369, pp. 691–699, 2004. Abstract
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Pellegrino R, Schirmacher P1, L. T. 1, E. V, N. O, E. HM, S. MM, Z. AA, G. R, S. P, S. P, and L. T, Protumorigenic role of Timeless in hepatocellular carcinoma, , 2014.
Pedersen, P., and M. M. Megahed, "Axisymmetric element analysis using analytical computing", Computers & Structures, vol. 5, no. 4: Elsevier, pp. 241–247, 1975. Abstract
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Peden, A. E., P. Cullen, K. L. Francis, H. Moeller, M. M. Peden, P. Ye, M. Tian, Z. Zou, S. M. Sawyer, A. Aali, et al., "Adolescent transport and unintentional injuries: a systematic analysis using the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019", The Lancet Public Health, vol. 7, no. 8: Elsevier, pp. e657–e669, 2022. Abstract
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Pecio, Ł., A. M. Otify, F. R. Saber, Y. A. El-Amier, M. E. Shalaby, S. Kozachok, A. K. Elmotayam, Ł. Świątek, A. Skiba, and K. Skalicka-Woźniak, "(Forssk.) Asch. & Schweinf. A Comprehensive Phytochemical Study via UPLC-Q-TOF-MS in the Context of the Embryo- and Cytotoxicity Profiles.", Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), vol. 27, issue 21, 2022. Abstract

(Family Asteraceae) is widely distributed in the Eastern desert of Egypt. It is a promising plant material for phytochemical analysis and pharmacologic studies, and so far, its specific metabolites and biological activity have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Herein, we report on the detailed phytochemical study using UPLC-Q-TOF-MS approach. This analysis allowed the putative annotation of 48 metabolites belonging to various phytochemical classes, including mostly sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, and phenolic acids. Further, zebrafish embryotoxicity has been carried out, where 100 µg/mL extract incubated for 72 h resulted in a slow touch response of the 10 examined larvae, which might be taken as a sign of a disturbed peripheral nervous system. Results of in vitro testing indicate moderate cytotoxicity towards VERO, FaDu, and HeLa cells with CC values between 91.6 and 101.7 µg/mL. However, selective antineoplastic activity in RKO cells with CC of 54.5 µg/mL was observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive profile of secondary metabolites that provides chemical-based evidence for its biological effects. A further investigation should be carried out to precisely define the underlying mechanisms of toxicity.

Pecio, Ł., A. M. Otify, F. R. Saber, Y. A. El-Amier, M. E. Shalaby, S. Kozachok, A. K. Elmotayam, Ł. Świątek, A. Skiba, and K. Skalicka-Woźniak, "Iphiona mucronata (Forssk.) Asch. & Schweinf. A Comprehensive Phytochemical Study via UPLC-Q-TOF-MS in the Context of the Embryo- and Cytotoxicity Profiles", Molecules, vol. 27, issue 21, 2022. Abstract

Iphiona mucronata (Family Asteraceae) is widely distributed in the Eastern desert of Egypt. It is a promising plant material for phytochemical analysis and pharmacologic studies, and so far, its specific metabolites and biological activity have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Herein, we report on the detailed phytochemical study using UPLC-Q-TOF-MS approach. This analysis allowed the putative annotation of 48 metabolites belonging to various phytochemical classes, including mostly sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, and phenolic acids. Further, zebrafish embryotoxicity has been carried out, where 100 µg/mL extract incubated for 72 h resulted in a slow touch response of the 10 examined larvae, which might be taken as a sign of a disturbed peripheral nervous system. Results of in vitro testing indicate moderate cytotoxicity towards VERO, FaDu, and HeLa cells with CC50 values between 91.6 and 101.7 µg/mL. However, selective antineoplastic activity in RKO cells with CC50 of 54.5 µg/mL was observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive profile of I. mucronata secondary metabolites that provides chemical-based evidence for its biological effects. A further investigation should be carried out to precisely define the underlying mechanisms of toxicity.

Pecinka, A., A. Abdelsamad, and G. T. H. Vu, "Hidden genetic nature of epigenetic natural variation in plants", Trends in Plant Science, vol. 18, issue 11, pp. 625-632, 2013. pecinka_abdelsamad_vu_2013.pdf
Payne, R., E. Coderre, W. T. Plunet, J. J. L. Carson, L. P. Renaud, W. Tetzlaff, R. Shamloul, and A. J. Bella, "892 INTERMITTENT CALORIC RESTRICTION MODIFIES NEUROBIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO BILATERAL CAVERNOUS NERVE CRUSH INJURY IN THE RAT AND FACILITATES RECOVERY OF ERECTILE FUNCTION", The Journal of Urology, vol. 183, no. 4: Elsevier, pp. e348–e349, 2010. Abstract
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Payne, A., A. Daniel, A. Mehta, B. Thompson, C. S. Bamji, D. Snow, H. Oshima, L. Prather, M. Fenton, L. Kordus, et al., "7.6 a 512× 424 cmos 3d time-of-flight image sensor with multi-frequency photo-demodulation up to 130mhz and 2gs/s adc", 2014 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference Digest of Technical Papers (ISSCC): IEEE, pp. 134-135, 2014. Abstract

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Pavulraj, S., M. Kamel, H. Stephanowitz, F. Liu, J. Plendl, N. Osterrieder, and W. Azab, "Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 Modulates Cytokine and Chemokine Profiles of Mononuclear Cells for Efficient Dissemination to Target Organs", Viruses, vol. 12, issue 9, 2020. AbstractWebsite
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Pavulraj, S., M. Kamel, H. Stephanowitz, F. Liu, J. Plendl, N. Osterrieder, and W. Azab, "Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 Modulates Cytokine and Chemokine Profiles of Mononuclear Cells for Efficient Dissemination to Target Organs.", Viruses, vol. 12, issue 9, 2020. Abstract

Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes encephalomyelopathy and abortion, for which cell-associated viremia and subsequent virus transfer to and replication in endothelial cells (EC) are responsible and prerequisites. Viral and cellular molecules responsible for efficient cell-to-cell spread of EHV-1 between peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and EC remain unclear. We have generated EHV-1 mutants lacking , , and genes, either individually or in combination. Mutant viruses were analyzed for their replication properties in cultured equine dermal cells, PBMC infection efficiency, virus-induced changes in the PBMC proteome, and cytokine and chemokine expression profiles. , , and are not essential for virus replication, but deletion resulted in a significant reduction in plaque size. Deletion of and gene significantly reduced cell-to-cell virus transfer from virus-infected PBMC to EC. EHV-1 infection of PBMC resulted in upregulation of several pathways such as Ras signaling, oxidative phosphorylation, platelet activation and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In contrast, chemokine signaling, RNA degradation and apoptotic pathways were downregulated. Deletion of , and modulated chemokine signaling and MAPK pathways in infected PBMC, which may explain the impairment of virus spread between PBMC and EC. The proteomic results were further confirmed by chemokine assays, which showed that virus infection dramatically reduced the cytokine/chemokine release in infected PBMC. This study uncovers cellular proteins and pathways influenced by EHV-1 after PBMC infection and provide an important resource for EHV-1 pathogenesis. EHV-1-immunomodulatory genes could be potential targets for the development of live attenuated vaccines or therapeutics against virus infection.

Pavitt, H. L., Y. Aydinok, A. El-Beshlawy, S. Bayraktaroglu, A. S. Ibrahim, M. M. Hamdy, W. Pang, C. Sharples, and T. G. St Pierre, "The effect of reducing repetition time TR on the measurement of liver R2 for the purpose of measuring liver iron concentration.", Magnetic resonance in medicine, vol. 65, issue 5, pp. 1346-51, 2011 May. Abstract

The effects of reducing the pulse repetition time from 2500 ms to 1000 ms when using spin-density-projection-assisted R2-magnetic resonance imaging for the purpose of measuring liver iron concentration were evaluated. Repeated liver R2 measurements were made using both protocols on 60 subjects with liver iron concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 48.6 mg Fe (g dry tissue)(-1). The mean total scan time at repetition time 1000 ms was 42% of that at repetition time 2500 ms. The repeatability coefficients for the two protocols were not significantly different from each other. A systematic difference in the measured R2 using each protocol was found indicating that an adjustment factor is required when one protocol is used to replace the other. The 95% limits of agreement between the two protocols were not significantly different from their repeatability coefficients indicating that the protocols can be interchanged without any significant change in accuracy or precision of liver iron concentration measurement.

Pavitt, H. L., Y. Aydinok, A. El-Beshlawy, S. Bayraktaroglu, A. S. Ibrahim, M. M. Hamdy, W. Pang, C. Sharples, and T. G. St Pierre, "The effect of reducing repetition time TR on the measurement of liver R2 for the purpose of measuring liver iron concentration.", Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, vol. 65, issue 5, pp. 1346-51, 2011 May. Abstract

The effects of reducing the pulse repetition time from 2500 ms to 1000 ms when using spin-density-projection-assisted R2-magnetic resonance imaging for the purpose of measuring liver iron concentration were evaluated. Repeated liver R2 measurements were made using both protocols on 60 subjects with liver iron concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 48.6 mg Fe (g dry tissue)(-1). The mean total scan time at repetition time 1000 ms was 42% of that at repetition time 2500 ms. The repeatability coefficients for the two protocols were not significantly different from each other. A systematic difference in the measured R2 using each protocol was found indicating that an adjustment factor is required when one protocol is used to replace the other. The 95% limits of agreement between the two protocols were not significantly different from their repeatability coefficients indicating that the protocols can be interchanged without any significant change in accuracy or precision of liver iron concentration measurement.

Paul, A. K., M. M. Rahman, M. M. Rahman, M. S. Islam, K. Bork, G. Witzke, J. H. Tidwell, G. Allan, R. C. Summerfelt, R. D. Clayton, et al., "Fatty acid concentration, proximate composition and mineral composition in fishbone flour of Nile Tilapia.", Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science, vol. 13, no. 1: orgz, pp. 40–59, 1974. Abstract
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