Publications

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Parlos, A. G., O. T. Rais, and A. F. Atiya, "Multi-step-ahead prediction using dynamic recurrent neural networks", International Symposium on Neural Networks, vol. 1, 1999. Abstract
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Parlos, A. G., A. F. Atiya, K. T. Chong, and W. K. Tsai, "Nonlinear identification of process dynamics using neural networks", Nuclear Technology, vol. 97, pp. 79–96, 1992. Abstract
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Parlos, A. G., O. T. Rais, and A. F. Atiya, "Multi-step-ahead prediction using dynamic recurrent neural networks", Neural Networks, vol. 13, pp. 765–786, 2000. Abstract
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Parlos, A. G., J. Muthusami, and A. F. Atiya, "Incipient fault detection and identification in process systems using accelerating neural network learning", Nuclear Technology, vol. 105, pp. 145–161, 1994. Abstract
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Parlos, A. G., S. K. Menon, and A. F. Atiya, "An algorithmic approach to adaptive state filtering using recurrent neural networks", IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, vol. 12, pp. 1411–1432, 2001. Abstract
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Parlos, A. G., A. F. Atiya, B. Fernandez, W. K. Tsai, and K. T. Chong, Neural node network and model, and method of teaching same, , 1995. Abstract
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Parlos, A. G., K. T. Chong, and A. F. Atiya, "Empirical model development and validation with dynamic learning in the recurrent multilayer perception", Nuclear Technology, vol. 105, pp. 271–290, 1994. Abstract
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Parlos, A. G., K. T. Chong, and A. F. Atiya, "Application of the recurrent multilayer perceptron in modeling complex process dynamics", IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, vol. 5, pp. 255–266, 1994. Abstract
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Parlos, A., A. Atiya, K. Chong, W. Tsai, and B. Fernandez, "Recurrent multilayer perceptron for nonlinear system identification", International Symposium on Neural Networks, 1991. Abstract
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Parnas, D., "On the criteria to be used in decomposing systems into modules", Communications of the ACM, vol. 15, pp. 1053–58, 1972. Abstract
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Parplys, A. C., J. I. Seelbach, S. Becker, M. Behr, A. Wrona, C. Jend, W. Y. Mansour, S. A. Joosse, H. - W. Stuerzbecher, H. Pospiech, et al., "High levels of RAD51 perturb DNA replication elongation and cause unscheduled origin firing due to impaired CHK1 activation.", Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.), vol. 14, issue 19, pp. 3190-202, 2015 Oct 2. Abstractparplys-2015.pdf

In response to replication stress ATR signaling through CHK1 controls the intra-S checkpoint and is required for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double strand breaks and interstrand crosslinks. In addition, HR, with its key player RAD51, provides critical support for the recovery of stalled forks during replication. High levels of RAD51 are regularly found in various cancers, yet little is known about the effect of the increased RAD51 expression on intra-S checkpoint signaling. Here, we describe a role for RAD51 in driving genomic instability caused by impaired replication and intra-S mediated CHK1 signaling by studying an inducible RAD51 overexpression model as well as 10 breast cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that an excess of RAD51 decreases I-Sce-I mediated HR despite formation of more RAD51 foci. Cells with high RAD51 levels display reduced elongation rates and excessive dormant origin firing during undisturbed growth and after damage, likely caused by impaired CHK1 activation. In consequence, the inability of cells with a surplus of RAD51 to properly repair complex DNA damage and to resolve replication stress leads to higher genomic instability and thus drives tumorigenesis.

Parplys, A. C., J. I. Seelbach, S. Becker, M. Behr, A. Wrona, C. Jend, W. Y. Mansour, S. A. Joosse, H. - W. Stuerzbecher, H. Pospiech, et al., "High levels of RAD51 perturb DNA replication elongation and cause unscheduled origin firing due to impaired CHK1 activation.", Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.), vol. 14, issue 19, pp. 3190-202, 2015. Abstract

In response to replication stress ATR signaling through CHK1 controls the intra-S checkpoint and is required for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double strand breaks and interstrand crosslinks. In addition, HR, with its key player RAD51, provides critical support for the recovery of stalled forks during replication. High levels of RAD51 are regularly found in various cancers, yet little is known about the effect of the increased RAD51 expression on intra-S checkpoint signaling. Here, we describe a role for RAD51 in driving genomic instability caused by impaired replication and intra-S mediated CHK1 signaling by studying an inducible RAD51 overexpression model as well as 10 breast cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that an excess of RAD51 decreases I-Sce-I mediated HR despite formation of more RAD51 foci. Cells with high RAD51 levels display reduced elongation rates and excessive dormant origin firing during undisturbed growth and after damage, likely caused by impaired CHK1 activation. In consequence, the inability of cells with a surplus of RAD51 to properly repair complex DNA damage and to resolve replication stress leads to higher genomic instability and thus drives tumorigenesis.

Parthasarathy, S., A. G. Parlos, and A. F. Atiya, "Direct Adaptive Control of Process Systems Using Recurrent Neural Networks", Colloids and Surfaces A-physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 1992. Abstract
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Parthasarathy, S., A. G. Parlos, and A. F. Atiya, Anticipatory control: A software retrofit for current plant controllers, , 1993. Abstract
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Parthasarathy, S., A. G. Parlos, and A. F. Atiya, Anticipatory control: A software retrofit for current plant controllers, , 1993. Abstract
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shawkat parves, M. Attia, and mohamed tawfik, "maxillofacial trauma in Qassim area a five years review", kasr eleini medical jounal, vol. 11, issue 6, pp. 303-311, 2005.
shawkat parves, and M. Attia, "maxillary antrolith on top of traumatic oroantral fistula report of a case", kasr eleini medical jounal, vol. 12, issue 5, pp. 39-42, 2006.
Parwani, R., and et al, "Odontogenic myxoma in a patient of Turner’s syndrome. ( Prof. Emad Daif was a peer reviewer for this article),", Journal of Cranio-Maxillary Diseases, vol. 3, issue 2, pp. 168, 2014.
Parwani, R., "A case of a rapidly expanding odontogenic myxoma of the mandible. ( Prof. Emad Daif was a peer reviewer for this article),", Journal of Oral Science International, vol. 12, issue 1, pp. 22-26, 2015.
Parwani, A. V., H. A. Hussein, B. I. Rosen, A. Lucchelli, L. Navarro, and L. J. Saif, "Characterization of field strains of group A bovine rotaviruses by using polymerase chain reaction-generated G and P type-specific cDNA probes.", Journal of clinical microbiology, vol. 31, issue 8, pp. 2010-5, 1993 Aug. Abstract

Dot and Northern blot hybridization assays were used to analyze field strains of group A bovine rotaviruses (BRVs) by using nucleic acid probes representing P and G type specificities. The probes were prepared by polymerase chain reaction amplification of hyperdivergent regions of the cloned VP4 (nucleotides 211 to 686) and VP7 (nucleotides 51 to 392) genes from four serotypically distinct (in P or G types) strains of rotaviruses: NCDV (G6, P1), IND (G6, P5), 69M (G8, P10), and Cr (G10, P11). The P and G type cDNA probes were radiolabeled with [32P]dCTP and hybridized with RNA extracted from reference cell culture-passaged rotavirus strains or the field samples. The field samples were obtained from young diarrheic calves from Ohio, Nebraska, Washington State, and Canada. The cDNA probes were specific for their respective G or P types on the basis of analysis of known P and G type reference strains. The G typing analysis of 102 field samples revealed that 36.3% (37 of 102) were G6, 2.9% (3 of 102) were G8, 12.7% (13 of 102) were G10, and 23.5% (24 of 102) were untypeable. The P typing results for 93 samples indicated that 2.2% (2 of 93) were P1 (NCDV-like), 20.4% (19 of 93) were P5 (UK-like), 9.3% (10 of 93) were P11 (B223-like), and 40.8% (38 of 93) were untypeable. This is the first report of the identification among BRV strains in North America of a G type other than G6 or G10. Our report further confirms that G6, P5 rotaviruses are predominant among the BRV field strains that we examined, and the P types of these strains differ from that of the BRV vaccine strain used in the United States (G6, P1). The large number of untypeable G (23.5%) and P (40.8%) types suggests that other or new P and G types exist among BRV field strains.

Pascalau, E., A. Awad, S. Sakr, and M. Weske, "On Maintaining Consistency of Process Model Variants", Business Process Management Workshops - {BPM} 2010 International Workshops and Education Track, Hoboken, NJ, USA, September 13-15, 2010, Revised Selected Papers, vol. 66: Springer, pp. 289–300, 2010. Abstract
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Pasha, A. M., H. H. Zeineldin, A. S. Al-Sumaiti, M. S. E. Moursi, and E. F. E. Sadaany, "Conservation Voltage Reduction for Autonomous Microgrids Based on V–I Droop Characteristics", IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, vol. 8, issue 3, pp. 1076-1085, 2017.
Pasha, A., H. Zeineldin, E. F. El-Saadany, and S. A. Kaabi, "Optimal allocation of distributed generation for planning master–slave controlled microgrids", IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution, vol. 13, issue 16, pp. 3704-3712, 2019.