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Abdelwahab, A., J. L. Sapp, M. Gardner, and R. Parkash, "Wide complex tachycardia in a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation", Heart Rhythm, vol. 5, no. 11: Elsevier, pp. 1621–1624, 2008. Abstract
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Abdelwahab, A., J. L. Sapp, M. Gardner, and R. Parkash, "Wide complex tachycardia in a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation", Heart Rhythm, vol. 5, issue 11: Elsevier, pp. 1621-1624, 2008. Abstract
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Abdel-Fattah, M. A. - K., and G. H. Galal-Edeen, "Why the Interpretive Paradigm is Needed for Evaluating e-Government Systems?", Proceedings of the 8th European Conference on Information Warfare and Security, Military Academy, Lisbon and the University of Minho, Braga, Portugal, 6-7 July 2009, Lausanne, Switzerland, pp. 1, 2009. Abstract

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Gregory S. Thomas, L. Samuel Wann, Adel H. Allam, R. C. Thompson, David E. Michalik, M. LindaSutherland, J. D. Suth, I. Guido P. Lombardi, Lucia Watson, Samantha L. Cox, et al., "Why did ancient people have atherosclerosis?: From autopsies to computed tomography to potential causes", GLOBAL HEART, vol. 9, issue 2, 2014.
Abdel-Fattah, M. A. - K., and G. H. Galal-Edeen, "Why an interpretive paradigm is needed for evaluating e-government systems", 9th European Conference on e-Government, pp. 1–10, 2009. Abstract
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Hawary, E. R., S. Meshaal, A. A. Mauracher, L. Opitz, A. D. Elaziz, S. Lotfy, A. Eldash, J. Boutros, N. Galal, P. J. Schmid, et al., "Whole‐exome sequencing of T‐B+ severe combined immunodeficiency in Egyptian infants, JAK3 predominance and novel variants", Clinical and experimental immunology, vol. 203, issue 3, pp. 448-457, 2021.
Etemadnia, H., A. H. M. E. D. HASSAN, S. Goetz, and K. Abdelghany, "Wholesale Hub Locations in Food Supply Chains", Transportation Research Record, vol. 2379, no. 1, pp. 80-89, 2013. AbstractWebsite

This paper addresses the wholesale hub location problem in food supply chains. The paper aims to design an optimal hub location network to serve food consumption markets through efficient connections with production sites. These optimal locations can be compared with the current locations of hubs to determine whether changes could lead to greater efficiencies. The model is mathematically formulated as a mixed-integer programming problem. The model minimizes the total network costs, which include the transportation of goods and the construction of hubs. The mathematical program considers several constraints on travel distance, hub capital cost and capacity, road condition, and transportation cost. Several experiments are conducted to test the sensitivity of the model to changes in parameters such as the food's average travel distance, the maximum hub capacity, and the transportation cost. Then, a real-world application is made to the Northeast United States livestock industry. Finally, the results show the effect of the changes in model parameters on the optimal hub network design (i.e., the number of hubs and the selection of hub locations).

FH Lv, YH Cao, GJ Liu, LY Luo,......., H.E. Rushdi,......., and M. H. Li, "Whole-Genome Resequencing of Worldwide Wild and Domestic Sheep Elucidates Genetic Diversity, Introgression, and Agronomically Important Loci", Molecular biology and evolution, vol. 39, issue 2, pp. 1-26, 2022.
Warejko, J. K., W. Tan, A. Daga, D. Schapiro, J. A. Lawson, S. Shril, S. Lovric, S. Ashraf, J. Rao, T. Hermle, et al., "Whole Exome Sequencing of Patients with Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome.", Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, vol. 13, issue 1, pp. 53-62, 2018 Jan 06. Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome overwhelmingly progresses to ESRD. More than 30 monogenic genes have been identified to cause steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. We previously detected causative mutations using targeted panel sequencing in 30% of patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Panel sequencing has a number of limitations when compared with whole exome sequencing. We employed whole exome sequencing to detect monogenic causes of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in an international cohort of 300 families.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Three hundred thirty-five individuals with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome from 300 families were recruited from April of 1998 to June of 2016. Age of onset was restricted to <25 years of age. Exome data were evaluated for 33 known monogenic steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome genes.

RESULTS: In 74 of 300 families (25%), we identified a causative mutation in one of 20 genes known to cause steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. In 11 families (3.7%), we detected a mutation in a gene that causes a phenocopy of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. This is consistent with our previously published identification of mutations using a panel approach. We detected a causative mutation in a known steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome gene in 38% of consanguineous families and in 13% of nonconsanguineous families, and 48% of children with congenital nephrotic syndrome. A total of 68 different mutations were detected in 20 of 33 steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome genes. Fifteen of these mutations were novel.,,, andwere the most common genes in which we detected a mutation. In another 28% of families, we detected mutations in one or more candidate genes for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

CONCLUSIONS: Whole exome sequencing is a sensitive approach toward diagnosis of monogenic causes of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. A molecular genetic diagnosis of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome may have important consequences for the management of treatment and kidney transplantation in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

Braun, D. A., M. Schueler, J. Halbritter, H. Y. Gee, J. D. Porath, J. A. Lawson, R. Airik, S. Shril, S. J. Allen, D. Stein, et al., "Whole exome sequencing identifies causative mutations in the majority of consanguineous or familial cases with childhood-onset increased renal echogenicity.", Kidney international, 2015 Oct 21. AbstractWebsite

Chronically increased echogenicity on renal ultrasound is a sensitive early finding of chronic kidney disease that can be detected before manifestation of other symptoms. Increased echogenicity, however, is not specific for a certain etiology of chronic kidney disease. Here, we performed whole exome sequencing in 79 consanguineous or familial cases of suspected nephronophthisis in order to determine the underlying molecular disease cause. In 50 cases, there was a causative mutation in a known monogenic disease gene. In 32 of these cases whole exome sequencing confirmed the diagnosis of a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy. In 8 cases it revealed the diagnosis of a renal tubulopathy. The remaining 10 cases were identified as Alport syndrome (4), autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease (2), congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (3), and APECED syndrome (1). In 5 families, in whom mutations in known monogenic genes were excluded, we applied homozygosity mapping for variant filtering and identified 5 novel candidate genes (RBM48, FAM186B, PIAS1, INCENP, and RCOR1) for renal ciliopathies. Thus, whole exome sequencing allows the detection of the causative mutation in 2/3 of affected individuals, thereby presenting the etiologic diagnosis, and allows identification of novel candidate genes.Kidney International advance online publication, 21 October 2015; doi:10.1038/ki.2015.317.

Daga, A., A. J. Majmundar, D. A. Braun, H. Y. Gee, J. A. Lawson, S. Shril, T. Jobst-Schwan, A. Vivante, D. Schapiro, W. Tan, et al., "Whole exome sequencing frequently detects a monogenic cause in early onset nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis.", Kidney international, vol. 93, issue 1, pp. 204-213, 2018 Jan. Abstract

The incidence of nephrolithiasis continues to rise. Previously, we showed that a monogenic cause could be detected in 11.4% of individuals with adult-onset nephrolithiasis or nephrocalcinosis and in 16.7-20.8% of individuals with onset before 18 years of age, using gene panel sequencing of 30 genes known to cause nephrolithiasis/nephrocalcinosis. To overcome the limitations of panel sequencing, we utilized whole exome sequencing in 51 families, who presented before age 25 years with at least one renal stone or with a renal ultrasound finding of nephrocalcinosis to identify the underlying molecular genetic cause of disease. In 15 of 51 families, we detected a monogenic causative mutation by whole exome sequencing. A mutation in seven recessive genes (AGXT, ATP6V1B1, CLDN16, CLDN19, GRHPR, SLC3A1, SLC12A1), in one dominant gene (SLC9A3R1), and in one gene (SLC34A1) with both recessive and dominant inheritance was detected. Seven of the 19 different mutations were not previously described as disease-causing. In one family, a causative mutation in one of 117 genes that may represent phenocopies of nephrolithiasis-causing genes was detected. In nine of 15 families, the genetic diagnosis may have specific implications for stone management and prevention. Several factors that correlated with the higher detection rate in our cohort were younger age at onset of nephrolithiasis/nephrocalcinosis, presence of multiple affected members in a family, and presence of consanguinity. Thus, we established whole exome sequencing as an efficient approach toward a molecular genetic diagnosis in individuals with nephrolithiasis/nephrocalcinosis who manifest before age 25 years.

Winkler, A. S., M. Leonardi, B. D. Michael, F. Abd-Allah, W. Carroll, and A. Guekht, "A WHO resolution on epilepsy and other neurological disorders.", The Lancet. Neurology, vol. 20, issue 3, pp. 171-172, 2021.
Ghanem, G. A. M., and K. S. Abdulaziz, M. Al-Ajlan and Abdulsalam, "A whitefly-transmitted geminivirus infecting bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants in Saudi Arabia.", Egypt . J. Phytopathol, vol. 31, issue 1-2, pp. 1-15, 2003. Abstract
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Centeno, C., T. Sitte, L. de Lima, S. Alsirafy, E. Bruera, M. Callaway, K. Foley, E. Luyirika, D. Mosoiu, K. Pettus, et al., "White Paper for Global Palliative Care Advocacy: Recommendations from a PAL-LIFE Expert Advisory Group of the Pontifical Academy for Life, Vatican City.", Journal of palliative medicine, 2018 Sep 26. Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Pontifical Academy for Life (PAV) is an academic institution of the Holy See (Vatican), which aims to develop and promote Catholic teachings on questions of biomedical ethics. Palliative care (PC) experts from around the world professing different faiths were invited by the PAV to develop strategic recommendations for the global development of PC ("PAL-LIFE group").

DESIGN: Thirteen experts in PC advocacy participated in an online Delphi process. In four iterative rounds, participants were asked to identify the most significant stakeholder groups and then propose for each, strategic recommendations to advance PC. Each round incorporated the feedback from previous rounds until consensus was achieved on the most important recommendations. In a last step, the ad hoc group was asked to rank the stakeholders' groups by order of importance on a 13-point scale and to propose suggestions for implementation. A cluster analysis provided a classification of the stakeholders in different levels of importance for PC development.

RESULTS: Thirteen stakeholder groups and 43 recommendations resulted from the first round, and, of those, 13 recommendations were chosen as the most important (1 for each stakeholder group). Five groups had higher scores. The recommendation chosen for these top 5 groups were as follows: (1) Policy makers: Ensure universal access to PC; (2) Academia: Offer mandatory PC courses to undergraduates; (3) Healthcare workers: PC professionals should receive adequate certification; (4) Hospitals and healthcare centers: Every healthcare center should ensure access to PC medicines; and (5) PC associations: National Associations should be effective advocates and work with their governments in the process of implementing international policy framework. A recommendation for each of the remaining eight groups is also presented.

DISCUSSION: This white paper represents a position statement of the PAV developed through a consensus process in regard to advocacy strategies for the advancement of PC in the world.

Centeno, C., T. Sitte, L. de Lima, S. Alsirafy, E. Bruera, M. Callaway, K. Foley, E. Luyirika, D. Mosoiu, K. Pettus, et al., "White Paper for Global Palliative Care Advocacy: Recommendations from a PAL-LIFE Expert Advisory Group of the Pontifical Academy for Life, Vatican City", Journal of Palliative Medicine, vol. 21, issue 10, pp. 1389-1397, 2018. AbstractWebsite

Abstract Background: The Pontifical Academy for Life (PAV) is an academic institution of the Holy See (Vatican), which aims to develop and promote Catholic teachings on questions of biomedical ethics. Palliative care (PC) experts from around the world professing different faiths were invited by the PAV to develop strategic recommendations for the global development of PC (“PAL-LIFE group”). Design: Thirteen experts in PC advocacy participated in an online Delphi process. In four iterative rounds, participants were asked to identify the most significant stakeholder groups and then propose for each, strategic recommendations to advance PC. Each round incorporated the feedback from previous rounds until consensus was achieved on the most important recommendations. In a last step, the ad hoc group was asked to rank the stakeholders' groups by order of importance on a 13-point scale and to propose suggestions for implementation. A cluster analysis provided a classification of the stakeholders in different levels of importance for PC development. Results: Thirteen stakeholder groups and 43 recommendations resulted from the first round, and, of those, 13 recommendations were chosen as the most important (1 for each stakeholder group). Five groups had higher scores. The recommendation chosen for these top 5 groups were as follows: (1) Policy makers: Ensure universal access to PC; (2) Academia: Offer mandatory PC courses to undergraduates; (3) Healthcare workers: PC professionals should receive adequate certification; (4) Hospitals and healthcare centers: Every healthcare center should ensure access to PC medicines; and (5) PC associations: National Associations should be effective advocates and work with their governments in the process of implementing international policy framework. A recommendation for each of the remaining eight groups is also presented. Discussion: This white paper represents a position statement of the PAV developed through a consensus process in regard to advocacy strategies for the advancement of PC in the world.

Hashem, A. H., M. N. E. Din, M. A. Gomaa, O. O. Khalaf, and A. Ismail, "White matter hyperintensities in elderly patients with late-onset and early-onset depression: a comparative study", Egyptian Journal of Psychiatry , vol. 40, issue 1, pp. 17-23, 2019.
Ali, H., P. Masschelein, S. Bruyere, P. Pigeat, A. Dauscher, H. Rinnert, D. Horwat, M. A. Khedr, and A. E. Giba, White light emission from Sm-doped YAG ceramic controlled by the excitation wavelengths, , vol. 142, pp. 107223, 2021. AbstractWebsite

This work reports, for first time, on optically-driven white light emission from samarium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet ceramic, Sm-doped YAG. Nanocrystalline Sm-doped YAG sample has been prepared via co-precipitation method then transformed to bulk ceramic by sintering process using Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are used to characterize the crystal structure of the nanocrystals. The micro-grains of the obtained ceramic have been demonstrated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopies have been performed on the ceramic sample. It is found that the PL spectral features are strongly dependent on the excitation wavelength. Remarkable PL spectral overlapping between bluish-green band and reddish-orange lines related to host defects/impurities and Sm ions, respectively, has been obtained. In addition, controlling the relative PL spectral contributions from the host-related emission and Sm ions has been achieved by changing the excitation wavelengths. This led to manipulate the emission color coordinates as investigated by chromaticity diagram. Moreover, under certain excitation wavelengths, an intense white emission is observed with a naked eye. The origin of the white emission has been discussed in light of specific PL spectral overlapping from the host and Sm ion contributions. This work emphasizes on the role played by the host defects/impurities in the optical properties of ceramic materials that can be exploited in several lighting applications.

Centeno, C., T. Sitte, L. DeLima, S. Alsirafy, E. Bruera, M. Callaway, K. Foley, E. Luyirika, D. Mosoiu, K. Pettus, et al., White Book for Global Palliative Care Advocacy. Recommendations from a PAL-LIFE expert advisory group of the Pontifical Academy for Life, Vatican City, , Vatican, Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 2019.
Shahin, A. I., Y. Guo, K. M. Amin, and A. A. Sharawi, "White blood cells identification system based on convolutional deep neural learning networks", Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, vol. 168, pp. 69-80, 2019.
Gouda, M. A., O. A. Alfahl, M. H. Ramadan, and A. H. Ashry, "Which is better? Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion Vs. Posterolateral fusion in treating degenerative spondylolisthesis.", Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development, vol. 10, issue 11, 2019.
Gawish, A., and M. E. A. Elhalwagy, "Which can attenuate hepatotoxicity induced by pesticides mixture natural or synthetic phenolic antioxidant", Nature and Science, vol. 7, issue 5: Citeseer, pp. 29-44, 2009. Abstract
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Gad, Z., A. Mohamed, and I. Fakhr, "When would we advocate a total thyroidectomy in cases of hypopharyngeal carcinoma?", Journal of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute, vol. 26, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 93–98, 2014. Abstract
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Gad, Z., A. Mohamed, and I. Fakhr, When would we advocate a total thyroidectomy in cases of hypopharyngeal carcinoma?, , vol. 26, issue 2, pp. 93 - 98, 2014/6//. AbstractWebsite

AbstractBackground and aimThe incidence of invasion of the thyroid gland by hypopharyngeal carcinomas is reported to be up to 57%. Our aim was to analyze the frequency of thyroid gland invasion in hypopharyngeal carcinoma treated by thyroidectomy with total laryngopharyngectomy and to identify patients in whom preservation of the thyroid gland is oncologically feasible and hence reduces post-operative hypothyroidism.
Patients and methods
This retrospective cohort study included 58 patients with hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated by thyroidectomy with total laryngopharyngectomy at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University between May 1996 and October 2005. Thyroid gland involvement was analyzed through review of charts and pathologic reports. Patients were assessed preoperatively by CT. The correlation between the thyroid gland involvement and the clinical and radiologic CT findings was meticulously examined.
Results
Thyroid gland involvement occurred in 37.9% (22/58) of all patients. T4 hypopharyngeal tumors were present in 29.3% (n = 17/58) of patients, paratracheal LN invasion was present in 37.9% (22/58) of patients, thyroid cartilage invasion was obvious in 19% (11/58) of patients, and previous radiotherapy was present in 5.2% (3/58) of patients. All patients with T4 hypopharyngeal tumors (n = 17/58) and with thyroid cartilage involvement (n = 11/58) had thyroid gland invasion as well. T4 hypopharyngeal tumors, paratracheal LN invasion, and thyroid cartilage invasion were statistically significant factors (P < 0.001, P = 0.009 and P < 0.001 respectively) in independent correlation.
Conclusion
We would advocate a total thyroidectomy in cases of advanced stages of hypopharyngeal carcinoma, bilateral tumors, postcricoid carcinoma and in all patients with definite radiological evidence of thyroid gland invasion.

Gad, Z., A. Mohamed, and I. Fakhr, "When would we advocate a total thyroidectomy in cases of hypopharyngeal carcinoma?", Journal of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute, vol. 26, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 93–98, 2014. Abstract
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Elbendary, A., M. Valdebran, A. A. Gad, and D. M. Elston, "When to suspect tinea; a histopathologic study of 103 cases of PAS-positive tinea.", Journal of cutaneous pathology, vol. 43, issue 10, pp. 852-7, 2016 Oct. Abstract

BACKGROUND: The histopathologic features of tinea vary widely and its diagnosis could be easily missed if the index of suspicion is not high. We aimed in this study to detect histopathologic features that could be a clue for diagnosis

METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 103 cases of tinea, confirmed by Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. For each case, gender, biopsy site, and pre-biopsy suspicion were recorded. The presence or absence of 17 microscopic features was noted.

RESULTS: Concordance between pre-biopsy and histopathologic diagnosis was noted in 57.28% of cases, suggesting that the diagnosis is often not suspected clinically. Among the histopathologic features studied, a compact stratum corneum (either uniform or forming a layer beneath a basket weave stratum corneum), parakeratosis, mild spongiosis and neutrophils in the stratum corneum and within the blood vessels were the most frequent features noted.

CONCLUSION: This study suggests histopathologic clues that should prompt the pathologist to order a PAS stain, especially when diagnosis is not suspected clinically.