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Allam, O. G., O. Kutkat, M. Gaballah, A. M. El-Halawany, A. Mostafa, S. Shouman, M. A. Ali, and O. El Farouk, "Virucidal effect of Moringa oleifera against SARS-CoV-2 and Influenza A/H1N1", African Journal of Biological Sciences, vol. 19, issue 1: African Society of Sustainable Development, pp. 69-78, 2023. Abstract
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Gamal, A., E. Ismael, S. Moubarak, H. Hussein, M. Hamoud, M. Zaki, M. A. Metwally, and O. Zahran, Virucidal Activity of Some Disinfectants, Chelatinging and Detergent Agents Used In Egyptian Poultry Industry Against Two Locally Isolated HPAI Circulating In Egypt, , Submitted. Abstract
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Ghali, N. I., O. Soluiman, N. El-Bendary, T. M. Nassef, S. A. Ahmed, Y. M. Elbarawy, and A. E. Hassanien, "Virtual reality technology for blind and visual impaired people: Reviews and Recent Advances,", Engineering Advances in Robotics and Virtual Reality, Germany, Intelligent Systems Reference Library - Springer, 2012. Abstract

Virtual reality technology enables people to become immersed in a computer-simulated and three-dimensional environment. In this chapter, we investigate the effects of the virtual reality technology on disabled people such as blind and visually impaired people (VIP) in order to enhance their computer skills and prepare them to make use of recent technology in their daily life. As well as, they need to advance their information technology skills beyond the basic computer training and skills. This chapter describes what best tools and practices in information technology to support disabled people such as deaf-blind and visual impaired people in their activities such as mobility systems, computer games, accessibility of e-learning, web-based information system, and wearable finger-braille interface for navigation of deaf-blind. Moreover, we will show how physical disabled people can benefits from the innovative virtual reality techniques and discuss some representative examples to illustrate how virtual reality technology can be utilized to address the information technology problem of blind and visual impaired people. Challenges to be addressed and an extensive bibliography are included.

Ghali, N. I., O. Soluiman, N. El-Bendary, T. M. Nassef, S. A. Ahmed, Y. M. Elbarawy, and A. E. Hassanien, "Virtual reality technology for blind and visual impaired people: reviews and recent advances", Advances in Robotics and Virtual Reality: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 363–385, 2012. Abstract
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Ghali, N. I., O. Soluiman, N. El-Bendary, T. M. Nassef, S. A. Ahmed, Y. M. Elbarawy, and A. E. Hassanien, "Virtual reality technology for blind and visual impaired people: reviews and recent advances", Advances in Robotics and Virtual Reality: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 363–385, 2012. Abstract
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Rehan Youssef, A., and M. Gumaa, "Virtual Reality in Orthopedic Rehabilitation", Virtual Reality in Health and Rehabilitation: CRC Press, 2020.
G, E. N. B., and I. M. M, "Virtual reality and hand rehabilitation. Part II: Physiotherapy for hypoplastic thumb using computer simulation.", Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, vol. 4, issue 2, pp. 75-83, 1999.
G, E. N. B., and I. M. M, "Virtual reality and hand rehabilitation. Part I: Computer aided hand function system.", Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University,, vol. 4, issue 2, pp. 65-73, 1999.
El-Ghandour, N. M. F., A. A. M. Ezzat, M. A. Zaazoue, P. Gonzalez-Lopez, B. S. Jhawar, and M. A. R. Soliman, "Virtual learning during the COVID-19 pandemic: a turning point in neurosurgical education.", Neurosurgical focus, vol. 49, issue 6, pp. E18, 2020. Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused dramatic changes in medical education. Social distancing policies have resulted in the rapid adoption of virtual learning (VL) by neurosurgeons as a method to exchange knowledge, but it has been met with variable acceptance. The authors surveyed neurosurgeons from around the world regarding their opinions about VL and how they see the future of neurosurgical conferences.

METHODS: The authors conducted a global online survey assessing the experience of neurosurgeons and trainees with VL activities. They also questioned respondents about how they see the future of on-site conferences and scientific meetings. They analyzed responses against demographic data, regions in which the respondents practice, and socioeconomic factors by using frequency histograms and multivariate logistic regression models.

RESULTS: Eight hundred ninety-one responses from 96 countries were received. There has been an increase in VL activities since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Most respondents perceive this type of learning as positive. Respondents from lower-income nations and regions such as Europe and Central Asia were more receptive to these changes and wanted to see further movement of educational activities (conferences and scientific meetings) into a VL format. The latter desire may be driven by financial savings from not traveling. Most queried neurosurgeons indicated that virtual events are likely to partially replace on-site events.

CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has improved perceptions of VL, and despite its limitations, VL has been well received by the majority of neurosurgeons. Lower-income nations in particular are embracing this technology. VL is still evolving, but its integration with traditional in-person meetings seems inevitable.

El-Ghandour, N. M. F., A. A. M. Ezzat, M. A. Zaazoue, P. Gonzalez-Lopez, B. S. Jhawar, and M. A. R. Soliman, "Virtual learning during the COVID-19 pandemic: a turning point in neurosurgical education.", Neurosurgical focus, vol. 49, issue 6, pp. E18, 2020. Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused dramatic changes in medical education. Social distancing policies have resulted in the rapid adoption of virtual learning (VL) by neurosurgeons as a method to exchange knowledge, but it has been met with variable acceptance. The authors surveyed neurosurgeons from around the world regarding their opinions about VL and how they see the future of neurosurgical conferences.

METHODS: The authors conducted a global online survey assessing the experience of neurosurgeons and trainees with VL activities. They also questioned respondents about how they see the future of on-site conferences and scientific meetings. They analyzed responses against demographic data, regions in which the respondents practice, and socioeconomic factors by using frequency histograms and multivariate logistic regression models.

RESULTS: Eight hundred ninety-one responses from 96 countries were received. There has been an increase in VL activities since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Most respondents perceive this type of learning as positive. Respondents from lower-income nations and regions such as Europe and Central Asia were more receptive to these changes and wanted to see further movement of educational activities (conferences and scientific meetings) into a VL format. The latter desire may be driven by financial savings from not traveling. Most queried neurosurgeons indicated that virtual events are likely to partially replace on-site events.

CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has improved perceptions of VL, and despite its limitations, VL has been well received by the majority of neurosurgeons. Lower-income nations in particular are embracing this technology. VL is still evolving, but its integration with traditional in-person meetings seems inevitable.

El-Ghandour, N. M. F., A. A. M. Ezzat, M. A. Zaazoue, P. Gonzalez-Lopez, B. S. Jhawar, and M. A. R. Soliman, Virtual learning during the COVID-19 pandemic: a turning point in neurosurgical education, , vol. 49, issue 6: American Association of Neurological Surgeons, pp. E18, 2020. AbstractWebsite
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Gawhary, S. E., M. M., E. M. A. E. Rahman, and O. N., "Viral screening of multi-transfused thalassemic patients", The Scientific journal of Al-Azhar Medicical Faculty, vol. 29, issue 1, pp. 1951-1964, 2008.
Maccari, A., and G. H. Galal, Views in {Support} of {Architectural} {Evolution}, , 2001. Abstract
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Finkelstein, A., M. Goedicke, J. Kramer, and C. Niskier, "Viewpoint {Oriented} {Software} {Development}: {Methods} and {Viewpoints} in {Requirements} {Engineering}", Lecture {Notes} in {Computer} {Science}, pp. 29–54, 1991. Abstract
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G.Amat, L.S.Ballomal, and L. M. Salah, "Vibration energy levels of CO2: Comparaison between a Standdard calculation and a calculation using effective normal coordinates", Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy, vol. 134, pp. 245-258 , 1989.
Rezk, S. S., and S. Gamal, "The viable system model and its applications in higher education: an overview", Kybernetes, vol. 48, issue 3, pp. 438-450, 2019.
Gamal, S., and S. S. Rezk, "The viable system model and its applications in higher education: an overview", Kybernetes, vol. 48, issue 3, pp. 438-450, 2019.
Aly, H., L. Mohsen, N. Badrawi, H. Gabr, Z. Ali, and D. Akmal, "Viability and Neural Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from the Umbilical Cord Following Perinatal Asphyxia", Journal of Perinatology, 2011. Abstract

Objective: Hypoxia-ischemia is the leading cause of neurological handicaps in newborns worldwide. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) collected from fresh cord blood of asphyxiated newborns have the potential to regenerate damaged neural tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the capacity for MSCs to differentiate into neural tissue that could subsequently be used for autologous transplantation. Study

Aly, H., L. Mohsen, N. Badrawi, H. Gabr, Z. Ali, and D. Akmal, "Viability and neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from the umbilical cord following perinatal asphyxia", Journal of Perinatololgy, vol. 32, issue 9, pp. 671-676, 2012. Abstract

Objective:Hypoxia-ischemia is the leading cause of neurological handicaps in newborns worldwide.
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) collected from fresh cord blood of asphyxiated newborns have the
potential to regenerate damaged neural tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the capacity for
MSCs to differentiate into neural tissue that could subsequently be used for autologous
transplantation.Study Design:We collected cord blood samples from full-term newborns with perinatal
hypoxemia (n=27), healthy newborns (n=14) and non-hypoxic premature neonates (n=14). Mononuclear
cells were separated, counted, and then analyzed by flow cytometry to assess various stem cell
populations. MSCs were isolated by plastic adherence and characterized by morphology. Cells
underwent immunophenotyping and trilineage differentiation potential. They were then cultured in
conditions favoring neural differentiation. Neural lineage commitment was detected using
immunohistochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein, tubulin III and oligodendrocyte marker O4
antibodies.Result:Mononuclear cell count and viability did not differ among the three groups of infants.
Neural differentiation was best demonstrated in the cells derived from hypoxia-ischemia term
neonates, of which 69% had complete and 31% had partial neural differentiation. Cells derived from
preterm neonates had the least amount of neural differentiation, whereas partial differentiation was
observed in only 12%.Conclusion:These findings support the potential utilization of umbilical cord stem
cells as a source for autologous transplant in asphyxiated neonates.

El-Sayed, A. A., G. Ashour, M. H. Khalifa, and A. Y. Gad, "Vetrification assessment of buffalo (Bubalis bubalis) oocytes: Morphological and molecular aspects.", The Inter. Conf. Anim. Prod., 7-10 April, 2015, Hurghada, Egypt, 2015. Abstract
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M.Shokry, F.El-Nady, and s. Gadallah, Veterinary orthopedic guidlines on a dog skeleton in combination with educational multimedia program, : faculty of veterinary medicine, surgery department, 2002. e-learning_software.pdf
M.Shokry, F.Elnady, and s. Gadallah, "Veterinary orthopedic guidlines on a dog ", Vet. Med.J. Giza, vol. 50, pp. 501-522, 2002. veterinary_orthopedic_guidlines_on_a_dog_skeletal_model.pdf
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