Publications

Export 14140 results:
Sort by: Author [ Title  (Asc)] Type Year
A B C D E [F] G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
U
Hussien, M., M. Elnaggar, A. Kamel, and A. H. Fattah, "Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Attitude Control using L1 Adaptive Controller", IEEE Access: IEEE, 2021. Abstract
n/a
El-Mokhtar, M. A., H. K. - A. Ramadan, M. M. Thabet, A. S. Abd-Elkader, M. Fouad, M. M. Sallam, E. A. Elgohary, A. A. Abd El-Hafeez, M. E. Mohamed, and I. M. Sayed, "The Unmet Needs of Hepatitis E Virus Diagnosis in Suspected Drug-Induced Liver Injury in Limited Resource Setting.", Frontiers in microbiology, vol. 12, pp. 737486, 2021. Abstractthe_unmet_needs_of_hepatitis_e_virus_diagnosis_in_suspected_drug-induced_liver_injury_in_limited_resource_setting.pdf

Currently, there are no specific biomarkers for drug-induced liver injury (DILI), and the diagnosis of DILI is based mainly on the exclusion of other causes of liver dysfunction and the recognition of potential causative drugs. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) diagnosis is not routinely enrolled in many countries, and HEV infection could be misdiagnosed as DILI. We retrospectively analyzed plasma samples ( = 80) collected from suspected DILI for HEV markers such as anti-HEV IgM, anti-HEV IgG, and HEV RNA. Anti-HEV antibodies were assessed using commercial ELISA kits. HEV RNA was tested by RT-qPCR targeting HEV ORF2/3, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted, and a putative threshold for liver function parameters was determined. Out of 80 samples, 12 samples were positive for anti-HEV IgM and anti-HEV IgG, and HEV RNA was detected in seven samples. The median viral load was 3.46 × 10 IU/ml, and the isolated viruses belonged to HEV genotype 1. The level of liver enzymes such as alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST), but not alkaline phosphatase (ALP), was significantly higher in HEV confirmed cases than in non-HEV confirmed cases. We identified a plasma ALT level of at least 415.5 U/L and AST level of at least 332 U/L; ALT/ALP ratio of at least 5.08 could be used as a guide for the patients diagnosed as DILI to be tested for HEV infection. The previous liver function parameters showed high sensitivity and good specificity. Hepatitis E virus was detected in suspected DILI cases. The diagnosis of DILI is not secure until HEV testing is done. Liver function parameters can be used as a guide for HEV testing in suspected DILI cases in countries with limited resources.

Farag, M. A., A. Porzel, and L. A. Wessjohann, "Unraveling the active hypoglycemic agent trigonelline in Balanites aegyptiaca date fruit using metabolite fingerprinting by NMR.", Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis, vol. 115, pp. 383-7, 2015 Nov 10. Abstract3-farag_et_al.__pharmaceutical__biomedical_analysis_2015.pdf

Trigonelline (3-carboxy-1-methyl pyridinium) was identified as a relevant bioactivity and taste imparting component in Balanites aegyptiaca fruit, using (1)H NMR of crude extracts without any fractionation or isolation step. The structural integrity of trigonelline was established within the extract matrix via(1)H NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC and HMBC and by comparison with authentic standard. A quantitative (1)H NMR method (qHNMR) was used to determine trigonelline concentrations in the peel and pulp of B. aegyptiaca fruit of 8 and 13mgg(-1), respectively. Trigonelline so far has not been reported from B. aegyptiaca or its genus as it easily escapes LC-MS based detection. Its discovery provides novel insight into the balanite fruits antidiabetic properties as the compound is known for a pronounced hypoglycemic effect. In addition, it is likely to impart the perceptible bitter taste portion to balanites sweet bitter taste. UPLC-MS of the crude extract additionally revealed the fruit flavonoid pattern showing quercetin/isorhamnetin flavonol conjugates in addition to epicatechin, the latter being present at much lower levels.

Farag, M. A., Z. T. Shakour, T. Lübken, A. Frolov, L. A. Wessjohann, and E. Mahrous, "Unraveling the metabolome composition and its implication for Salvadora persica L. use as dental brush via a multiplex approach of NMR and LC-MS metabolomics.", Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis, vol. 193, pp. 113727, 2021. Abstract

Salvadora persica L. (toothbrush tree, Miswak) is well recognized in most Middle Eastern and African countries for its potential role in dental care, albeit the underlying mechanism for its effectiveness is still not fully understood. A comparative MS and NMR metabolomics approach was employed to investigate the major primary and secondary metabolites composition of S. persica in context of its organ type viz., root or stem to rationalize for its use as a tooth brush. NMR metabolomics revealed its enrichment in nitrogenous compounds including proline-betaines i.e., 4-hydroxy-stachydrine and stachydrine reported for the first time in S. persica. LC/MS metabolomics identified flavonoids (8), benzylurea derivatives (5), butanediamides (3), phenolic acids (8) and 5 sulfur compounds, with 21 constituents reported for the first time in S. persica. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of either NMR or LC/MS dataset clearly separated stem from root specimens based on nitrogenous compounds abundance in roots and is justifying for its preference as toothbrush versus stems. The presence of betaines at high levels in S. persica (9-12 μg/mg dry weight) offers novel insights into its functioning as an osmoprotectant that maintains the hydration of oral mucosa. Additionally, the previously described anti-inflammatory activity of stachydrine along with the antimicrobial effects of sulfonated flavonoids, benzylisothiocynate and ellagic acid derivatives are likely contributors to S. persica oral hygiene health benefits. Among root samples, variation in sugars and organic acids levels were the main discriminatory criterion. This study provides the first standardization of S. persica extract using qNMR for further inclusion in nutraceuticals.

Farag, M. A., Z. T. Shakour, T. Lübken, A. Frolov, L. A. Wessjohann, and E. Mahrous, Unraveling the metabolome composition and its implication for Salvadora persica L. use as dental brush via a multiplex approach of NMR and LC–MS metabolomics, , vol. 193, pp. 113727, 2021. AbstractWebsite

Salvadora persica L. (toothbrush tree, Miswak) is well recognized in most Middle Eastern and African countries for its potential role in dental care, albeit the underlying mechanism for its effectiveness is still not fully understood. A comparative MS and NMR metabolomics approach was employed to investigate the major primary and secondary metabolites composition of S. persica in context of its organ type viz., root or stem to rationalize for its use as a tooth brush. NMR metabolomics revealed its enrichment in nitrogenous compounds including proline-betaines i.e., 4-hydroxy-stachydrine and stachydrine reported for the first time in S. persica. LC/MS metabolomics identified flavonoids (8), benzylurea derivatives (5), butanediamides (3), phenolic acids (8) and 5 sulfur compounds, with 21 constituents reported for the first time in S. persica. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of either NMR or LC/MS dataset clearly separated stem from root specimens based on nitrogenous compounds abundance in roots and is justifying for its preference as toothbrush versus stems. The presence of betaines at high levels in S. persica (9−12 μg/mg dry weight) offers novel insights into its functioning as an osmoprotectant that maintains the hydration of oral mucosa. Additionally, the previously described anti-inflammatory activity of stachydrine along with the antimicrobial effects of sulfonated flavonoids, benzylisothiocynate and ellagic acid derivatives are likely contributors to S. persica oral hygiene health benefits. Among root samples, variation in sugars and organic acids levels were the main discriminatory criterion. This study provides the first standardization of S. persica extract using qNMR for further inclusion in nutraceuticals.

El-Wahed, A. A. A., M. A. Farag, W. A.Eraqi, G. A. M. Mersal, C. Zhao, S. A. M. Khalifa, and H. R. El-Seedi, "Unravelling the beehive air volatiles profile as analysed via solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and chemometrics", Journal of King Saud University - Science, vol. 33, 2021.
Zhang, L., M. M. Ismail, G. Rocchetti, N. m Fayek, L. Lucini, and F. R. Saber, "The Untargeted Phytochemical Profile of Three Meliaceae Species Related to In Vitro Cytotoxicity and Anti-Virulence Activity against MRSA Isolates", Molecules, vol. 27, pp. 435, 2022.
Noll, I., T. Eisenberg, K. Failing, M. Rohde, K. Schlez, W. Wolter, A. Fawzy, and M. Zschöck, "Untersuchung zur Verbreitung von Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in hessischen Milchviehbeständen", Berliner und Münchener Tierärztliche Wochenschrift , vol. 130, pp. 13-20, 2017.
Fayez, M., "Untraditional N2-fixing bacteria as biofertilizers for wheat and barley", Folia Microbiologica, vol. 35, issue 3, pp. 218 - 226, 1990. AbstractWebsite

The screening of 27 isolates grown on nitrogen-free medium for nitrogen-fixing ability resulted in the isolation of five organisms belonging to Bacillaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae. Estimates of N2-fixation efficiencies of these isolates indicated that they may be responsible for low rates of N2-fixation in soil. The possible association of these isolates as well as of Azotobacter and Azospirillum with wheat and barley was investigated in a greenhouse experiment. The highest values of nitrogenase activity on plant root were recorded in treatments inoculated with composite inocula of the isolated N2-fixers, particularly when Azotobacter and/or Azospirillum were added in combination. Inoculation with single inoculum of each of the N2-fixing isolates had no significant influence on plant growth, except with Pseudomonas and Bacillus for wheat and barley, respectively. Highly significant increases in growth of both plants were recorded in all cases of multistrain inoculation. © 1990 ACADEMIA, Publishing House of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences.

Ammar, H., and R. Fouda, "An unusual cause of hoarseness.", BMJ case reports, vol. 2012, 2012. Abstract

A 55-year-old man had a 3 month history of hoarseness and choking when he drinks liquids. Physical examination revealed evidence of left sided palsy of 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th cranial nerves. A brain MRI revealed a skull base lytic lesion. The authors diagnosed Collet-Sicard syndrome. The patient was found to have colon cancer. He received palliative skull radiotherapy and died few weeks later in hospice care.

Ammar, H., and R. Fouda, "An unusual cause of hoarseness.", BMJ case reports, vol. 2012, 2012. Abstract

A 55-year-old man had a 3 month history of hoarseness and choking when he drinks liquids. Physical examination revealed evidence of left sided palsy of 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th cranial nerves. A brain MRI revealed a skull base lytic lesion. The authors diagnosed Collet-Sicard syndrome. The patient was found to have colon cancer. He received palliative skull radiotherapy and died few weeks later in hospice care.

Fouda, R., H. Ammar, E. Sobhy, and A. M. Amin, "Unusual cause of pericardial effusion", BMJ Case Reports, vol. 2012, 2012. AbstractWebsite

A 65-year-old Egyptian lady suffering from non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis was referred to our unit for evaluation of a massive pericardial effusion. Few weeks before presentation, she suffered from progressive abdominal distention and dyspnoea. She denied fever, rigors or other cardiorespiratory symptoms. Examination revealed shrunken liver, spleenomegaly and ascites. Chest was clear to auscultation and heart sounds were distant. Chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly and clear lung fields. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed the results of abdominal examination. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed a massive pericardial effusion (PEF) and rheumatic mitral stenosis. Chest tomography showed PEF and clear lung fields. One litre of exudate was removed via TTE-guided needle pericardiocentesis. A pericardio-peritoneal shunt was suspected, which was confirmed via a radioisotopic study. This case is among very few cases that reported PEF in a cirrhotic ascetic patient secondary to a radio-isotopically confirmed pericardio-peritoneal shunt in the literature.

Fouda, R., H. Ammar, E. Sobhy, and A. M. Amin, "Unusual cause of pericardial effusion.", BMJ case reports, vol. 2012, 2012. Abstract

A 65-year-old Egyptian lady suffering from non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis was referred to our unit for evaluation of a massive pericardial effusion. Few weeks before presentation, she suffered from progressive abdominal distention and dyspnoea. She denied fever, rigors or other cardiorespiratory symptoms. Examination revealed shrunken liver, spleenomegaly and ascites. Chest was clear to auscultation and heart sounds were distant. Chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly and clear lung fields. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed the results of abdominal examination. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed a massive pericardial effusion (PEF) and rheumatic mitral stenosis. Chest tomography showed PEF and clear lung fields. One litre of exudate was removed via TTE-guided needle pericardiocentesis. A pericardio-peritoneal shunt was suspected, which was confirmed via a radioisotopic study. This case is among very few cases that reported PEF in a cirrhotic ascetic patient secondary to a radio-isotopically confirmed pericardio-peritoneal shunt in the literature.

Fouda, R., H. Ammar, E. Sobhy, and A. M. Amin, "Unusual cause of pericardial effusion.", BMJ case reports, vol. 2012, 2012. Abstract

A 65-year-old Egyptian lady suffering from non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis was referred to our unit for evaluation of a massive pericardial effusion. Few weeks before presentation, she suffered from progressive abdominal distention and dyspnoea. She denied fever, rigors or other cardiorespiratory symptoms. Examination revealed shrunken liver, spleenomegaly and ascites. Chest was clear to auscultation and heart sounds were distant. Chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly and clear lung fields. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed the results of abdominal examination. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed a massive pericardial effusion (PEF) and rheumatic mitral stenosis. Chest tomography showed PEF and clear lung fields. One litre of exudate was removed via TTE-guided needle pericardiocentesis. A pericardio-peritoneal shunt was suspected, which was confirmed via a radioisotopic study. This case is among very few cases that reported PEF in a cirrhotic ascetic patient secondary to a radio-isotopically confirmed pericardio-peritoneal shunt in the literature.

Fouda, R., H. Ammar, E. Sobhy, and A. M. Amin, "Unusual cause of pericardial effusion.", BMJ case reports, vol. 2012, 2012 Sep 04. Abstract

A 65-year-old Egyptian lady suffering from non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis was referred to our unit for evaluation of a massive pericardial effusion. Few weeks before presentation, she suffered from progressive abdominal distention and dyspnoea. She denied fever, rigors or other cardiorespiratory symptoms. Examination revealed shrunken liver, spleenomegaly and ascites. Chest was clear to auscultation and heart sounds were distant. Chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly and clear lung fields. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed the results of abdominal examination. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed a massive pericardial effusion (PEF) and rheumatic mitral stenosis. Chest tomography showed PEF and clear lung fields. One litre of exudate was removed via TTE-guided needle pericardiocentesis. A pericardio-peritoneal shunt was suspected, which was confirmed via a radioisotopic study. This case is among very few cases that reported PEF in a cirrhotic ascetic patient secondary to a radio-isotopically confirmed pericardio-peritoneal shunt in the literature.

Sedeek, M. S., S. M. Afifi, M. K. Mansour, M. Hassan, F. M. Mehaya, I. A. Naguib, M. A. S. Abourehab, and M. A. Farag, "Unveiling Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Compositional Differences between Dukkah and Za’atar via SPME-GCMS and HPLC-DAD", Molecules, vol. 27, issue 19, 2022. Abstract

Interest in plant-based diets has been on the rise in recent years owing to the potential health benefits of their individual components and the notion that plant-based diets might reduce the incidence of several diseases. Egyptian dukkah and Syrian za’atar are two of the most historic and famous Middle Eastern herbal blends used for their anti-inflammatory, hypolipidemic, and antidiabetic effects. Headspace SPME-GCMS and HPLC-DAD were adopted for characterizing the aroma profile and phenolic compounds of both herbal blends, respectively. Further, vapor-phase minimum inhibitory concentration was employed for assessing each blend’s antibacterial potential, while their antioxidant potential was estimated via in vitro antioxidant assays. SPME headspace analysis indicated the abundance of ethers and monoterpene hydrocarbons, while HPLC revealed the presence of several phenolics including rosmarinic acid, ferulic acid, and rutin. Biological investigations affirmed that vapor-phase of the tested blends exhibited antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, while the antioxidant potential of the blends was investigated and expressed as Trolox (125.15 ± 5.92 to 337.26 ± 13.84 μM T eq/mg) and EDTA (18.08 ± 1.62 to 51.69 41 ± 5.33 μM EDTA eq/mg) equivalent. The presented study offers the first insight into the chemical profile and biological activities of both dukkah and za’atar.

Sedeek, M. S., S. M. Afifi, M. K. Mansour, M. Hassan, F. M. Mehaya, I. A. Naguib, M. A. S. Abourehab, and M. A. Farag, "Unveiling Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Compositional Differences between Dukkah and Za’atar via SPME-GCMS and HPLC-DAD", Molecules, vol. 27, issue 19, pp. 6471, 2022.
Otify, A. M., R. M. Ibrahim, B. Abib, A. Laub, L. A. Wessjohann, Y. Jiang, and M. A. Farag, "Unveiling metabolome heterogeneity and new chemicals in 7 tomato varieties via multiplex approach of UHPLC-MS/MS, GC–MS, and UV–Vis in relation to antioxidant effects as analyzed using molecular networking and chemometrics", Food Chemistry, vol. 417: Elsevier Ltd, 2023. AbstractWebsite

Tomatoes show diverse phytochemical attributes that contribute to their nutritive and health values. This study comprehensively dissects primary and secondary metabolite profiles of seven tomato varieties. UHPLC-qTOF-MS assisted molecular networking was used to monitor 206 metabolites, 30 of which were first-time to be reported. Flavonoids, as valuable antioxidants, were enriched in light-colored tomatoes (golden sweet, sun gold, and yellow plum) versus high tomatoside A, an antihyperglycemic saponin, in cherry bomb and red plum varieties. UV–Vis analysis revealed similar results with a strong absorbance corresponding to rich phenolic content in light varieties. GC–MS unveiled monosaccharides as the main contributors to samples’ segregation, found abundant in San Marzano tomato accounting for its sweet flavor. Fruits also demonstrated potential antioxidant activities in correlation to their flavonoids and phospholipids. This work provides a complete map of tomatoes’ metabolome heterogeneity for future breeding programs and a comparative approach utilizing different metabolomic platforms for tomato analysis. © 2023 Elsevier Ltd

El-Kersh, D. M., R. F. Abou El-Ezz, M. Fouad, and M. A. Farag, "Unveiling Natural and Semisynthetic Acylated Flavonoids: Chemistry and Biological Actions in the Context of Molecular Docking.", Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), vol. 27, issue 17, 2022. Abstract

Acylated flavonoids are widely distributed natural metabolites in medicinal plants and foods with several health attributes. A large diversity of chemical structures of acylated flavonoids with interesting biological effects was reported from several plant species. Of these, 123 compounds with potential antimicrobial, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive, analgesic, and anti-complementary effects were selected from several databases including SCI-Finder, Scopus, Google Scholar, Science Direct, PubMed, and others. Some selected reported biologically active flavonoids were docked in the active binding sites of some natural enzymes, namely acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, α-amylase, α-glucosidase, aldose reductase, and HIV integrase, in an attempt to underline the key interactions that might be responsible for their biological activities.

Fouad, A., W. elakel, H. A. Hafez, and R. Abdullah, Update of Brucellosis in Egyptian Referral Fever Hospital, , 2005. Abstract

n/a

Feigin, V. L., R. V. Krishnamurthi, P. Parmar, B. Norrving, G. A. Mensah, D. A. Bennett, S. Barker-Collo, A. E. Moran, R. L. Sacco, T. Truelsen, et al., "Update on the Global Burden of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke in 1990-2013: The GBD 2013 Study.", Neuroepidemiology, vol. 45, issue 3, pp. 161-76, 2015. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Global stroke epidemiology is changing rapidly. Although age-standardized rates of stroke mortality have decreased worldwide in the past 2 decades, the absolute numbers of people who have a stroke every year, and live with the consequences of stroke or die from their stroke, are increasing. Regular updates on the current level of stroke burden are important for advancing our knowledge on stroke epidemiology and facilitate organization and planning of evidence-based stroke care.

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to estimate incidence, prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs) and their trends for ischemic stroke (IS) and hemorrhagic stroke (HS) for 188 countries from 1990 to 2013.

METHODOLOGY: Stroke incidence, prevalence, mortality, DALYs and YLDs were estimated using all available data on mortality and stroke incidence, prevalence and excess mortality. Statistical models and country-level covariate data were employed, and all rates were age-standardized to a global population. All estimates were produced with 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs).

RESULTS: In 2013, there were globally almost 25.7 million stroke survivors (71% with IS), 6.5 million deaths from stroke (51% died from IS), 113 million DALYs due to stroke (58% due to IS) and 10.3 million new strokes (67% IS). Over the 1990-2013 period, there was a significant increase in the absolute number of DALYs due to IS, and of deaths from IS and HS, survivors and incident events for both IS and HS. The preponderance of the burden of stroke continued to reside in developing countries, comprising 75.2% of deaths from stroke and 81.0% of stroke-related DALYs. Globally, the proportional contribution of stroke-related DALYs and deaths due to stroke compared to all diseases increased from 1990 (3.54% (95% UI 3.11-4.00) and 9.66% (95% UI 8.47-10.70), respectively) to 2013 (4.62% (95% UI 4.01-5.30) and 11.75% (95% UI 10.45-13.31), respectively), but there was a diverging trend in developed and developing countries with a significant increase in DALYs and deaths in developing countries, and no measurable change in the proportional contribution of DALYs and deaths from stroke in developed countries.

CONCLUSION: Global stroke burden continues to increase globally. More efficient stroke prevention and management strategies are urgently needed to halt and eventually reverse the stroke pandemic, while universal access to organized stroke services should be a priority. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Gadallah, N. S., H. Ghahari, F. R. A. N. C. I. S. C. O. J. A. V. I. E. R. PERIS-FELIPO, and M. A. X. I. M. I. L. I. A. N. FISCHER, "Updated checklist of Iranian Opiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)", Zootaxa, vol. 4066, issue 1, pp. 1-40, 2016.
Tourism