Cross-sectional study and genotyping of rotavirus-A infections in ruminants in Kuwait.

Citation:
Cross-sectional study and genotyping of rotavirus-A infections in ruminants in Kuwait., Abdou, Nadra-Elwgoud M. I., Majeed Qais A. H., Saad Ashraf A., Mijatovic-Rustempasic Slavica, Bowen Michael D., and Samy Attia , BMC veterinary research, Volume 17, Issue 1, p.245, (2021)

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are zoonotic pathogens responsible for acute enteritis in human and neonatal ruminants. This research aimed to determine the prevalence of RVA in ruminants (cattle, sheep, and goats) and investigate the circulating RVA genotypes in these animals in Kuwait. We conducted a cross-sectional study to detect RVA in ruminants, using an immunochromatography test (IC), direct sandwich ELISA test, and real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) assay using fecal samples.

RESULTS: A total of 400 cattle, 334 sheep, and 222 goats were examined. The prevalence of RVA was 5.3, 1.2, and 2.3%, respectively, using IC. The ELISA test detected RVA from 4.3% of cattle, 0.9% of sheep, and 1.8% of goats. There was a significant association between the occurrence of diarrhea and the presence of RVA in bovine fecal samples (p-value = 0.0022), while no statistical association between diarrhea and the presence of RVA in fecal samples of sheep and goats was observed (p-value = 0.7250; p-value = 0.4499, respectively). Twenty-three of the IC-positive samples (17 from cattle, two from sheep, and four from goats) were tested using a RT-qPCR RVA detection assay targeting the NSP3 gene. The results showed that 21 of 23 IC-positive samples tested positive by RT-qPCR. Detection of RVA genotypes revealed that G10P[11] was the predominant strain in cattle (58.8%), followed by G8P[1] (11.7%). One sheep sample was genotyped as G8P[1]. In addition, G6P[1] and G6P[14] were detected in goat samples.

CONCLUSION: The present study revealed that the IC was more sensitive in detecting RVA antigen in fecal samples than the ELISA test. A higher occurrence of RVA infection was observed in cattle than in sheep and goats. This study suggests that RVA might be a risk factor of diarrhea in bovine calves less than 2 weeks old. This research also demonstrates the circulation of RVA in sheep and goat populations in Kuwait. Finally, the G10P[11] RVA genotype was the most prevalent genotype identified from cattle samples.

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