Dega osteotomy for the management of developmental dysplasia of the hip in children aged 2-8 years: results of 58 consecutive osteotomies after 13-25 years of follow-up.

Citation:
El-Sayed, M. M. H., M. Hegazy, N. M. Abdelatif, M. A. ElGebeily, T. ElSobky, and S. Nader, "Dega osteotomy for the management of developmental dysplasia of the hip in children aged 2-8 years: results of 58 consecutive osteotomies after 13-25 years of follow-up.", Journal of children's orthopaedics, vol. 9, issue 3, pp. 191-8, 2015 Jun.

Abstract:

PURPOSE: Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a term used to cover a broad spectrum of anomalies ranging from mild dysplasia to high-riding dislocations. We report the management of DDH in children using the Dega osteotomy and their long-term follow-up.

METHODS: Fifty-eight hips from 48 children younger than 8 years treated using the Dega osteotomy between January 1988 and October 2000 were included in this multcenter study. Both prospective (41 hips) and retrospective (17 hips) cases were included, and follow-up was for a minimum of 13 years. Radiographs were made preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, after 6 weeks or at removal of the spica cast if any, at 6-month intervals and/or as indicated for 3 years postoperatively and then on annual basis until the last follow-up. A single-cut computed tomographic scan was performed for all prospective patients. Special attention was paid to the predictive measures of hip arthrosis and the survival of the hip after Dega osteotomy.

RESULTS: The final clinical outcome was favorable in 44 hips (75.9 %). Eleven hips needed a second surgery (acetabuloplasty and/or arthroplasty) during the follow-up period.

CONCLUSIONS: In our pediatric patient population the Dega osteotomy proved to be an adequate measure for the management of this complex condition. The worst complication was avascular necrosis, and all of the affected hips ended with failure (pain, another surgery, or both).