Production of biofertilizers using baker's yeast effluent and their application to wheat and barley grown in north Sinai deserts

Citation:
Ali, S. M., M. A. Hamza, G. Amin, M. Fayez, M. EL-Tahan, M. Monib, and N. A. Hegazi, "Production of biofertilizers using baker's yeast effluent and their application to wheat and barley grown in north Sinai deserts", Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science, vol. 51, issue 6, pp. 589 - 604, 2005.

Abstract:

Effluent from the baker's yeast industry was experimented on as a culture medium for the growth and biomass production of diazotrophs. The effluent supported good growth of Azotobacter chroococcum, Enterobacter agglomerans and Klebsiella pneuomoniae, Azospirillum brasilense, Bacillus polymyxa and Pseudomonas putida and strongly proposed for biofertilizers production of associative diazotrophs. Slurry preparations containing natural polymers, e.g. Arabic gum (5%), pero-dextrin (20%), starch granules (10%) or gelatine (20%) were impregnated with cells of tested diazotrophs. With storage, entrapped cells of B. polymyxa were viable up to 160 days, while gradual decreases in Azospirillum numbers were recorded. Pero-dextrin, a by-product of the starch industry, was selected as the appropriate biocarrier accommodating diazotroph cells and maintaining prolonged survival rates and nitrogenase activity. Cell cultures of A. brasilense, A. chroococcum, B. polymyxa, E. agglomerans and P. putida were equally mixed and entrapped into pero-dextrin slurry biofertilizer formulation named as "BIOGRAMINA". Tested diazotrophs successfully survived (ca. 108 cfu ml-1) in such formulation up to 6 months at both ambient and cold temperatures. The response of wheat and barley to "BIOGRAMINA" in the presence or absence of N fertilizers was evaluated in greenhouse and field trials. Highest total biological yields were recorded for inoculated plants simultaneously supplemented with rational N fertilizer dose. © 2005 Taylor & Francis.

Notes:

Cited By :18Export Date: 26 April 2021

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