Effect of stretching exercises versus autogenic training on preeclampsia.

Citation:
Awad, M. A., M. E. Hasanin, M. M. Taha, and A. A. Gabr, "Effect of stretching exercises versus autogenic training on preeclampsia.", Journal of exercise rehabilitation, vol. 15, issue 1, pp. 109-113, 2019.

Abstract:

Preeclampsia (PE) is the most common medical complication of pregnancy characterized by hypertension and significant proteinuria after the 20th week of gestation, its prevalence is about 2%-8% of pregnancies. Antihypertensive drugs were found to have an adverse effect to both the mother and the fetus so interest is increased in nonchemical treatment. This study was conducted to compare between the effects of stretching exercises versus autogenic training (AT) on PE. This study was carried out on 40 preeclamptic primiparous women, their gestational age was exceeding 20 weeks. They were randomly divided into two equal groups; group A consisted of 20 women received stretching exercises and group B consisted of 20 women received relaxation training in the form of AT. All patients in both groups A and B received (3 sessions per week for 6 weeks) and received methyldopa as the antihypertensive drug. Evaluation of all patients in both groups A and B was done before and after the treatment program by assessing arterial blood pressure and proteinuria. Results of this study revealed that there is a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and proteinuria in both groups A and B after 6 weeks of treatment. There was no significant difference between both groups post-treatment in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and proteinuria. It can be concluded that both stretching exercise and AT were found to be effective nonchemical methods which control the symptoms of PE.

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