Effectiveness and Safety of Continuous Infusion Regional Anesthesia Pumps for Pain After Thoracopelvic Fusion Surgery for Persistent Spinal Pain Syndrome.

Citation:
Soliman, M. A. R., A. Khan, A. O. Aguirre, N. Ruggiero, B. R. Levy, B. L. Mariotti, P. K. Jowdy, K. R. Rajjoub, R. M. Hess, Q. Zeeshan, et al., "Effectiveness and Safety of Continuous Infusion Regional Anesthesia Pumps for Pain After Thoracopelvic Fusion Surgery for Persistent Spinal Pain Syndrome.", World neurosurgery, vol. 154, pp. e815-e821, 2021.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Postoperative pain after complex revision spine surgery, especially for the treatment of persistent spinal pain syndrome (PSPS), is frequently severe and can be debilitating, requiring the use of intravenous and oral opioids. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a continuous infusion regional anesthesia pump placed after thoracopelvic fusion for the treatment of PSPS.

METHODS: We performed a retrospective comparative study of consecutive patients who had undergone thoracopelvic fusion for PSPS. The patients included in the present study had either had a continuous infusion regional anesthesia pump placed during surgery or had not (control). Demographics, use of preoperative and postoperative opioids, postoperative adverse events, length of hospital stay, and 90-day readmission were recorded.

RESULTS: The patients in the pump group (n = 14) had used fewer opioids during their hospital stay compared with the control group (n = 12; P = 0.6). This difference was greater for postoperative days 1 and 2 (P = 0.3 and P = 0.2, respectively). No significant difference was found in opioid usage during the first 14 days after surgery (P = 0.8) or at the 3-month postoperative follow-up evaluation (P = 0.8). Furthermore, no significant difference was found between the 2 groups in terms of postoperative complications. The pump group had a 1.4-day shorter hospital stay (P = 0.7). The control group had more 90-day readmissions than did the pump group (P = 0.2).

CONCLUSIONS: Despite showing a trend toward less usage of opioids during the first 2 days after surgery and a shorter hospital stay with no increased complications in the pump group, the study data failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference between the two groups.

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