Publications

Export 5 results:
Sort by: [ Author  (Desc)] Title Type Year
A B C D [E] F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
E
Elbardisy, M., Y. William, M. Sherif, M. Aboulnaga, and M. Guedes, "Sustainable refurbishment of abandoned urban areas: the case study of former SIAPA area, Galliera – Bologna, Italy", SBE21 Sustainable Built Heritage 14-16 April 2021, Bolzano-Bozen, Italy Accepted papers received: 22 September 2021
Published online: 26 October 2021, Volume 863, Bolzano — South Tyrol, Italy, IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES), pp. 012014 (1-10), 2021.
El-batran, M., and M. Aboulnaga, "Climate Change Adaptation: an Overview on Challenges and Risks in Cities, Regions Affected, Cost and benefits of Adaptation and Finance Mechanisms", Handbook on Climate Change Adaptation, Hamburg, Germany, Springer , 2015.
Eid, A. S., M. Aboulnaga, and A. H. Mahmoud, "Future Cities for Climate Action: Automated Code Compliance Checking in Reference to Energy Efficiency Building Regulations", Green Buildings and Renewable Energy, Switzerland — CHAM, Springer , 2020. Abstract

Cities around the world are facing many challenges in terms of population increase, energy consumption, transport, traffic congestion and water supply that result in huge waste, air pollution and colossal emissions of greenhouse gases, mainly CO2. Such huge increase of population would need housing and dwellings to accommodate such increase. Energy efficiency in buildings can result in mitigating energy use. In developing countries, building code compliance is not receiving enough attention from local authorities. The Energy Efficiency Code Compliance Checking (EECCC) is one of the most vital issues in making buildings low carbon, energy efficient and meet green standards, especially amid the urgent actions needed to offset climate change risks and attain sustainable development goals. This paper presents a BIM-based approach for automating compliance checking of the Egyptian code for enhancing energy efficiency in commercial buildings by virtue of visual programming language (VPL). The developed approach is capable to access data and information available in the BIM model during the preconstruction phase to automate the design evaluation complied with the energy code criteria. The VPL approach is flexible enough to modify the created nodes and links to build new or update the existing checking rules and thus facilitates the design checking process performed by designers, architects and urban designers.

Ehsan M. Elhennawi, and Mohsen M. Aboulnaga, "Impacts of Exploiting Nanocoating on Buildings’ Façades to Improve Air Quality in Megacities, Mitigate Climate Change and Attain Livability", Green Buildings and Renewable Energy, Switzerland - CHAM, Springer, 2020. Abstract

Urban air pollution caused by transport, traffic congestion, and high energy use is considered one of the major challenges in megacities. This paper presents a study on the effect of using nanocoating on the buildings’ facades to improve air quality in cities. It also highlights the types and uses of nanocoating in various countries through a comparative analysis of global case studies. The objective of this work focuses on titanium dioxide as a self-cleaning photo-catalytic to mitigate pollution and improve indoor air quality. The methodology depends on inductive and analytical approaches: the first part includes a review on the nanotechnology and nanocoating, whereas the analytical part encompasses an assessment of global models for nanotechnology. The study analysed different buildings around the world that applied different types of Nanocoatings. The review of these buildings were divided according to their types of nanocoating, the country where most common types of buildings used and the country that has similar matching to Egypt’s climatic conditions. By analysing each building facades, it was helpful to extract the nanotechnologies, especially self-cleaning (photo-catalytic) that mitigate air pollution. In addition, assessments of the percentage of pollutants worldwide to identify the most important pollutants that are classified as top contaminants threatening human health, if the concentration in the internal spaces exceeds the limits recommended globally were highlighted. Finally, a review of the report of Ministry Environment, Egypt, and the maximum limits of pollutants at the global scale was also conducted, which led to the extraction of requirements to reduce contaminants in the internal spaces of buildings using titanium dioxide as self-cleaning (photo-catalytic). Results show the potential of titanium dioxide as a self-cleaning (photo-catalytic) to mitigate the level of pollution to enhance livability in cities.