Publications

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2021
Aboulnaga, M., M. Sala, and A. Trombadore, "Open Innovation Strategies, Green Policies, and Action Plans for Sustainable Cities—Challenges, Opportunities, andApproaches......", Smart and Sustainable Planning for Cities and Regions , Switzerland , Springer , 2021. b9d8908d-c664-4977-9f9a-a55e91ace3d5.png
2020
GadAllah, S., and M. Aboulnaga, "Climate Action and SDGS’ Attainment: Insulation Materials’ Impacts Assessment", Sustainable Mediterranean Construction (SMC), issue 11, pp. 76-80, 2020.
Mohsen M. Aboulnaga, Youssef M. AbouZied, and Sara S. Abouelsoud, "Climate Action: Urban Farming as an Innovative Tool for Regenerating Cities to be Sustainable—Case of the City of Conegliano, Italy", Green Buildings and Renewable Energy, Switzerland — CHAM, Springer , 2020. Abstract

Cities face many challenges to meet sustainability. This chapter presents a conceptual vision for creating a livable centre for the communities in the city of Conegliano with a special focus on sustainability, not only from an urban farm viewpoint but also as a new social aspect to achieve social sustainability. The design strategy integrates new smart architectural and urban agricultural solutions. Various technologies are incorporated in the building including aquaponic tray farming system, vertical axis wind turbine modules and cable trellis ivy facades as well as multi-spectrum LED-censored lights and double-glazed glass to reduce energy consumption. Such technologies create a self-sustained building with minimal waste and CO2 emissions and livable environments. The social innovation also includes various social spaces (local gym, Treviso cafeteria, educational farm and a research lab), all of which were redesigned to maintain the current existing structure, minimize embodied energy and maximize the social interaction with the users yet encourage communal interaction between the citizens and enhance connectivity. For economic sustainability, a business model including strategy, marketing, operations and SWOT analysis was carried out to predict the project’s operation cost and labour management. Results show that retrofitting this factory will turn such vacant site into a vibrant and multifunctional spot. Also, results indicate that enhancing the site would make the city a livable and an economic hub that serves people, raises awareness and is self-sustained for years to come by addressing sustainable development and SGDs, mainly SDG 7, 8, 11, 12 and 13.

Aboulnaga, M., N. Amin, and B. Rebelle, "Climate Adaptation Action: The Role of Clean Energy and Strategic Action Plans of South Mediterranean Cities", Green Buildings and Renewable Energy, Switzerland — CHAM, Springer , 2020. Abstract

Local governments worldwide face challenges to meet the Paris Climate Agreement 2015 and its targets amid the high CO2 emissions. Municipalities should play a major role in addressing climate actions and transform cities to more sustainable energy resources to attain SDGs. The European Union initiated a major project ‘Cleaner Energy Saving Mediterranean Cities’ (CES-MED) from 2011 to 2018, which is under the European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument (ENPI) to support South Mediterranean countries in developing Sustainable Energy and Climate Action Plans—SECAP. This chapter presents strategic action plans to support and strengthen the capacity of local authorities to embrace and implement sustainable development and clean energy policies in line with existing national regulatory and legislative frameworks yet to understand the energy consumption in all sectors that utilize energy in the city, map energy consumption and CO2 emissions over 1 year, develop priority planned actions and establish climate actions. This chapter also highlights the assessment that was conducted on eight sectors such as transport, residential, tertiary and government buildings, agriculture, industry, waste, wastewater and tourism in two cities (Hurghada and Luxor) in Egypt. The assessment is based on the calculation of energy use and GHG emission according to the methodology of the European Commission Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC). The planned action and climate actions comprise of seven priority actions for the city of Hurghada and five priority actions for the city of Luxor including as follows: (1) transport, urban sustainable mobility master plan; (2) tourism, sustainable green boats; (3) tourism, green and sustainable hotels and resorts; (4) sustainable approach for governorate buildings; (5) sustainable approach for residential building; (6) solar energy development; and (7) green city awareness unit. However, in this paper, the first three priority actions are presented. Results in the city of Luxor (2015) indicate that total energy consumption and the corresponding global GHG emissions are estimated to be 4937 GWh/year and 1797 ktCO2eq/year, whereas these are 3338 GWh/year and 1338 ktCO2eq/year in Hurghada.

Eid, A. S., M. Aboulnaga, and A. H. Mahmoud, "Future Cities for Climate Action: Automated Code Compliance Checking in Reference to Energy Efficiency Building Regulations", Green Buildings and Renewable Energy, Switzerland — CHAM, Springer , 2020. Abstract

Cities around the world are facing many challenges in terms of population increase, energy consumption, transport, traffic congestion and water supply that result in huge waste, air pollution and colossal emissions of greenhouse gases, mainly CO2. Such huge increase of population would need housing and dwellings to accommodate such increase. Energy efficiency in buildings can result in mitigating energy use. In developing countries, building code compliance is not receiving enough attention from local authorities. The Energy Efficiency Code Compliance Checking (EECCC) is one of the most vital issues in making buildings low carbon, energy efficient and meet green standards, especially amid the urgent actions needed to offset climate change risks and attain sustainable development goals. This paper presents a BIM-based approach for automating compliance checking of the Egyptian code for enhancing energy efficiency in commercial buildings by virtue of visual programming language (VPL). The developed approach is capable to access data and information available in the BIM model during the preconstruction phase to automate the design evaluation complied with the energy code criteria. The VPL approach is flexible enough to modify the created nodes and links to build new or update the existing checking rules and thus facilitates the design checking process performed by designers, architects and urban designers.

Helmy, S. E., and M. M. Aboulnaga, "Future Cities: The Role of Biomimicry Architecture in Improving Livability in Megacities and Mitigating Climate Change Risks", Sustainable Ecological Engineering Design, Switzerland — CHAM, Springer , 2020. Abstract

Since the early start of universe and creation, man and creatures were enclitic by nature and well organized in harmony. Biomimicry as a concept is the mimicry and imitation of systems and strategies seen in the living world as a foundation for different fields, science and applications such as architectural field. Biomimicry has been applied through three levels, an organism level, behaviour level, and an ecosystem level, in terms of its forms, materials, construction methods, processes, or functions. Biomimicry is a source of innovation, particularly in creating more sustainable and potentially regenerative architecture. The problem is addressed according to the challenges that megacities face today, mainly high energy use, urban air pollution due to transport, large number of inhabitants’ activities, CO2 level and natural resources consumption in all sectors. So, improving cities’ infrastructure, mainly buildings, is one of the major steps needed to enhance livability in cities and mitigate climate change. The objective of this work is to assess the value of adopting biomimicry design concept, as a sustainable tool in architecture, due to its potential to create regenerative built environments. The research strategy is centred on a qualitative strategy and the method of data collection is a narrative and case studies’ types. It is also depends on a deductive approach. In this chapter, architectural examples are examined as a part of nature in order to explore the effect of nature on architecture. In addition, a comparative analysis of biomimicry approach depicting global applications of biomimicry in architecture is presented and discussed in terms of sustainability dimensions. Results of comparing the examined buildings show that the optimum building is CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 in Australia which has the best sustainability features related to the biomimicry approach and linked to the climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Ehsan M. Elhennawi, and Mohsen M. Aboulnaga, "Impacts of Exploiting Nanocoating on Buildings’ Façades to Improve Air Quality in Megacities, Mitigate Climate Change and Attain Livability", Green Buildings and Renewable Energy, Switzerland - CHAM, Springer, 2020. Abstract

Urban air pollution caused by transport, traffic congestion, and high energy use is considered one of the major challenges in megacities. This paper presents a study on the effect of using nanocoating on the buildings’ facades to improve air quality in cities. It also highlights the types and uses of nanocoating in various countries through a comparative analysis of global case studies. The objective of this work focuses on titanium dioxide as a self-cleaning photo-catalytic to mitigate pollution and improve indoor air quality. The methodology depends on inductive and analytical approaches: the first part includes a review on the nanotechnology and nanocoating, whereas the analytical part encompasses an assessment of global models for nanotechnology. The study analysed different buildings around the world that applied different types of Nanocoatings. The review of these buildings were divided according to their types of nanocoating, the country where most common types of buildings used and the country that has similar matching to Egypt’s climatic conditions. By analysing each building facades, it was helpful to extract the nanotechnologies, especially self-cleaning (photo-catalytic) that mitigate air pollution. In addition, assessments of the percentage of pollutants worldwide to identify the most important pollutants that are classified as top contaminants threatening human health, if the concentration in the internal spaces exceeds the limits recommended globally were highlighted. Finally, a review of the report of Ministry Environment, Egypt, and the maximum limits of pollutants at the global scale was also conducted, which led to the extraction of requirements to reduce contaminants in the internal spaces of buildings using titanium dioxide as self-cleaning (photo-catalytic). Results show the potential of titanium dioxide as a self-cleaning (photo-catalytic) to mitigate the level of pollution to enhance livability in cities.

Mousa, H., M. Elhadidi, H. Abdelhafez, P. Tonini, L. Fellin, A. Frongia, V. Castellucci, and M. Aboulnaga, "The Role of Urban Farming in Revitalizing Cities for Climate Change Adaptation and Attaining Sustainable Development: Case of the City of Conegliano, Italy", Green Buildings and Renewable Energy, Switzerland — CHAM, Springer , 2020. Abstract

Cities worldwide face many challenges, primarily climate change risks, urban population increase, and high resources use. The objective of this work is centered on revitalizing the abandoned factory of ex-Zanussi factory in the city of Conegliano, north of Venice Italy to be a city hub of sustainability. This paper present the attempt that was carried out to regenerate the old building to be green and sustainable site by utilizing urban farm technologies based on soilless solutions. Also, the retrofitted building and site aim at strengthening the capacity of the city of Conegliano economically, socially, and environmentally. The philosophy of planning and redesigning the site was centered on architectural and urban farming innovation. Many smart solutions were exploited onto the facades to turn this building and site into a live hub. The retrofitted building includes inspiring domes with revolving light wells to allow natural lighting of Conegliano and to reduce energy consumption, hence, mitigate CO2. Also, LED facades, ETFE cushions and rainwater harvesting as well as ZIP grow and recycled bricks. In addition, mobile application was used to enhance the learning experience, self-learning of urban farming, and what could be possibly done through the education facility. A business model, including the strategy, SWOT, operation cost, and a feasibility study were developed to best inform on the revenues from the project to reduce employment. Results indicate that by integrating agriculture with architecture using smart technologies could lead to economic growth, society integration, and achieve livability. Moreover, the diversity of users and mixed activities with nature are materialized. Finally, the project supports the city of Conegliano’s efforts in achieving successful interaction between technological and social innovation, and assists local governments in meeting Paris Agreement targets in Italy, yet attains SDGs, mainly SDG 7, 9, 11, 12, and 13.

Barakat, M. M., M. M. Aboulnaga, and M. F. Badran, "Towards Resilient Cities: Improving Unplanned Urban Areas—Strategic Environmental Assessment and Upgrading Guidelines in Developing Countries", Green Buildings and Renewable Energy, Switzerland — CHAM, Springer, 2020. Abstract

Unplanned urban areas are considered one of the major challenges amid the fact that 70% of world’s population will be living in cities by 2050. This chapter presents a study conducted on one of the unplanned urban areas (informal areas) in Cairo, Egypt, in an attempt to provide guidelines for upgrading informal areas in developing countries based on sustainability indicators deduced from a comparative analysis of global case studies and a local case in Cairo, Egypt. The objective of this work focuses on informal areas (slums) from the economic, social, and environmental viewpoint to develop a surrounding community and increase the inward investment in the urban area. Qualitative and quantitative approaches were used in this study. The study presents an assessment of different informal areas around the world concerning sustainability and strategic environmental assessment (SEA). Two models developed by GIZ and Norman Foster were presented and compared according to a well-planned sustainable development goals checklist. In addition, a detailed assessment was also conducted to assess the local case study based on economic statistics and other sustainable development (SD) dimensions—livability, viability, and equitability. The SEA analysis includes three categories: urban, socioeconomic, and environmental. Results show that the potential of this assessment in upgrading informal areas concerning developing countries is promising. The SEA results also indicate that upgrading informal areas is a successful process when cooperation between authorities and residents exists to cover all SD pillars and the existence of ecosystems to ensure the resilience of urban areas in cities and attain sustainable development goals mainly SDG 11, SDG 12, and SDG 13.

Aboulnaga, M., A. Amer, and A. Al-Sayed, "Towards Sustainable Development: Mega Project’s Strategic Environmental Assessment to Attain SDG 7, 9, 11, 12 & 13", Sustainable Mediterranean Construction (SMC), issue 12, pp. 101-106, 2020. 1215.pdf
2019
Aboulnaga, M., F. Elwan, and R. Al-Sharouny, M., Urban Climate Change Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policies, Projects, and Scenarios, , Switzerland , Springer Nature, 2019.
Aboulnaga, M., A. Alwan, and M. R. Elsharouny, "Climate Change Adaptation: Assessment and Simulation for Hot-Arid Urban Settlements – The Case Study of the Asmarat Housing Project in Cairo, Egypt.", Sustainable Building for a Cleaner Environment: Springer, Cham, 2019. Abstractlink.springer.comchapter10.1007978-3-319-94595-8_37.pdf

Urban areas in hot-arid climatic zones, especially in Egypt, are facing real challenges in responding to heat island effect, providing thermal comfort and adapt to climate change (CC) impacts. Such challenges are mounting due to CC risks that are manifested worldwide, e.g., severe storms that recently slashed the Gulf of Mexico, Texas, and Florida, USA. Metrological data indicate that the increase in hot summer days would result in rapid multiplication in heat stress, death cases, and economic impacts. A severe event was observed in Cairo, Egypt, in August 2015, where air temperature was recorded high 49 °C above the normal temperature for 10 days, hence resulting in 200 cases that were hospitalized from heat stress and 98 deaths. The CC direct risks are not only limited to urban areas and public health. Due to the fact that Egypt is highly dependent on fossil fuels to produce electricity, GHG emissions, mainly CO2 will be significantly increasing. Therefore, sustainable and green measures and actions are vital to be considered and implemented in all sectors. Under such adverse CC impacts, it is necessary for all stakeholders to examine current urban projects in order to assess their ability to respond to CC adaptation measures. This paper presents the assessment of a low-income housing settlement that was recently built in Cairo. The Asmarat project is selected as the case study to simulate the long-term impact of CC scenarios by 2080 on one of the capital’s urban settlements and to test the role of passive cooling configurations in mitigating CC effect in cities to identify possible countermeasures. Simulation programs ENVI-met and DesignBuilder were used to assess and measure the resilience and sustainability of the selected urban project. The study simulates the urban microclimate in terms of the urban form by 2016 and 2080 to evaluate CC impact. Six measures were tested including passive cooling design configurations, building elevation, buildings’ envelops, vegetation, and water features, and orientation and high albedo were tested, and results were presented. These findings address adaptation policies, actions and measures, and simulations of the role of buildings’ retrofitting and cities’ upgrading in coping with CC mitigation/adaptation to narrow the information gap and yet understand the challenges facing the adaptation measures in hot-arid zones. The changes in climatic parameters resulted in an increased magnitude of thermal discomfort by 1 point on the PMV thermal sensation scale in the built environment within hot-arid climate zones. In addition, results indicate that adaptation measures through buildings’ retrofitting and upgrading cities’ strategies played a vital role in adapting with CC risks through the enhancement of outdoor and indoor thermal comfort and mitigating CO2 emissions.

Aboulnaga, M., and M. Mostafa, "Sustainability Principles and Features Learned from Vernacular Architecture: Guidelines for Future Developments Globally and Egypt", Sustainable Vernacular Architecture – How the Past can Enrich the Future , Switzerland , Springer Nature , 2019. Abstract

Abstract

Vernacular architecture is the traditional architecture built by indigenous (local) people in a country. It can be considered sustainable as it exhibits the consideration of environmental, social, cultural and economic factors. Vernacular architecture has been built in many countries around the world. It reflects the culture and tradition of indigenous people using simple forms and local materials supported by simple construction skills. Africa has many examples of vernacular architecture using natural resources within reach locally. Also, Latin America, Asia and Europe show various and similar examples. By-and-large, vernacular architecture illustrates many aspects of sustainability and addresses sustainable development requirements in terms of needs and limitations. Nonetheless, vernacular buildings demonstrate compliance with and adherence to basic green principles. This chapter focuses on vernacular architecture in general and presents leading global and regional traditional buildings, including examples in Africa (58 countries) and Middle East (13 countries) to learn about and detect synergies and to assist in better understanding of the vernacular architecture worldwide and the selected cases in Egypt. In this review, building types, materials, elements of structure and forms were illustrated and assessed. Factors influencing vernacular architecture in many countries are presented and discussed. Comparison between vernacular architecture examples in Africa was conducted in terms of building types and climatic region, specifically under parameters such as building shape (form), colour and materials as well as structural and sustainability features. In addition, examples of vernacular architecture in Egypt were reviewed and illustrated, mainly: Aswan, Luxor and Western Desert. A comparison between examples of vernacular architecture in Siwa Oasis in Egypt was conducted in terms of use, building materials, structure and project description as well as social sustainability, economic sustainability and environmental sustainability. Finally, lessons learned from global, regional and Egyptian vernacular architecture as well as sustainability guidelines for future development are outlined.

Keywords: Vernacular architecture Sustainability principles Sustainable materials Guidelines Africa Egypt

2018
Aboulnaga, M., "Sustainability Measures of Public Buildings in Seaside Cities: The New Library of Alexandria (New Bibliotheca Alexandrina), Egypt", Design of Sustainable buildings on seaside zones, Switzerland , Springer , 2018.
2017
Aboulnaga, M., "High-Rise Buildings in the Context of Sustainability: Urban Metaphors of Greater Cairo, Egypt – A Case Study on Sustainability and Strategic Environmental Assessment ", Sustainable High Rise Buildings in Urban Zones: Advantages, Challenges, and Global Case Studies, Switzerland , Springer , 2017.
Aboulnaga, M., and A. Wanas, "Sustainability of Higher Educational Buildings: Retrofitting Measures to Enhance Energy Performance — The Case of AASTMT Business Management School Building, Egypt,", Mediterranean Green Buildings and Renewable Energy, Switzerland , Springer , 2017.
2016
Aboulnaga, M., A. Wanas, M. ElKhayat, and A. Elwan, "Low carbon Residential Building for Climate Change Adaptation: The Case of a Village House in the Delta Region, Egypt.", A.NERGY 2016 Conference at Incheon University: "Initiative for Green and Sustainable Asia", Incheon, South Korea, 2016. extended_abstract_-_ccr_prof_mohsen_aboulnaga_et_al_for___6th_anergy_2016_sk.pdf
2015
El-batran, M., and M. Aboulnaga, "Climate Change Adaptation: an Overview on Challenges and Risks in Cities, Regions Affected, Cost and benefits of Adaptation and Finance Mechanisms", Handbook on Climate Change Adaptation, Hamburg, Germany, Springer , 2015.
2014
Aboulnaga, M., "Sustainable Building for a Green and an Efficient Built Environment: New and Existing Case Studies in Dubai", Sustainability, Energy and Architecture: Case Studies in Realizing Green Buildings, UK and USA, Elsevier - Academic Press , 2014.