Cholestasis In Infants With Down Syndrome Is Not Due To Extrahepatic Biliary Atresia: A Ten-Year Single Egyptian Centre Experience.

Citation:
Kotb, M. A., I. Draz, C. W. Basanti, S. T. El Sorogy, H. M. Abd Elkader, H. Esmat, H. Abd El Baky, and D. S. Mosallam, "Cholestasis In Infants With Down Syndrome Is Not Due To Extrahepatic Biliary Atresia: A Ten-Year Single Egyptian Centre Experience.", Clinical and experimental gastroenterology, vol. 12, pp. 401-408, 2019.

Abstract:

Purpose: We aimed to define the clinical presentations, course and outcome of cholestasis in infants with Down syndrome (trisomy 21) who presented to the Pediatric Hepatology Clinic, New Children Hospital, Cairo University, Egypt.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of data of cohort of infants with Down syndrome and cholestasis who followed up during 2005-2015.

Results: Among 779 infants with cholestasis who presented during 2005-2015, 61 (7.8%) had Down syndrome. Six dropped out. Among the 55 who followed-up for a mean duration +SD = 12.1 ± 16.7 months, none had extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA), 37 (63.3%) had neonatal hepatitis and 18 (32.7%) had non-syndromic paucity of intrahepatic biliary radicals. Fourteen (25.4%) had associated congenital heart disease. Only 35 (63.3%) cleared the jaundice. Twenty-nine (52.7%) received ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA); of them, 13 cleared the jaundice, one improved, 14 progressed and one died, compared to 22 who cleared the jaundice of the 26 who did not receive UDCA. Only three of those who did not receive UDCA progressed and none died. UDCA carried a 3.4-fold risk of poor prognosis (= 0.001). UDCA use was associated with more complications (= 0.016) in those with Down syndrome and cholestasis.

Conclusion: We did not come across EHBA among neonates and infants with Down syndrome in 10 years. Non-syndromic paucity is associated with favorable outcome in infants with Down syndrome. UDCA use in cholestasis with Down syndrome is associated with poor outcome.

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