Anxiety, depression and coping strategies among chronic medical patients with coronavirus disease-2019: a multicenter follow-up cohort study.

Citation:
Shousha, H. I., N. Madbouly, shimaa afify, N. Asem, E. fouad, R. Maher, S. S. Moussa, A. Abdelazeem, E. M. Youssif, K. Y. Harhira, et al., "Anxiety, depression and coping strategies among chronic medical patients with coronavirus disease-2019: a multicenter follow-up cohort study.", Journal of mental health (Abingdon, England), pp. 1-9, 2021.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that COVID-19 patients experience high levels of anxiety, depression, and stress during the pandemic. Patients adopt different coping strategies to reduce their psychological distress.

AIM: To compare the immediate and long-term psychological impact of COVID-19 disease on patients with and without chronic medical illnesses (CMI) and identify coping styles of both groups during the peak of COVID-19 disease in Egypt.

METHODS: This is a cohort follow-up study, that included an online survey consisting of General Health Questionnaire-12, Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale, Beck Depression Inventory and Brief-COPE scale. The Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist was completed after 6 months. Questionnaires were distributed to adult patients with a confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 virus infection during their quarantine in Egypt.

RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding anxiety and depression during the acute infection. Patients without CMI relied significantly on the use of informational support to cope with COVID-19 disease. Patients with CMI continued to show significant depressive symptoms after 6 months without significant PTSD symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has similar immediate psychological impact on patients with and without CMI. However, patients with CMI continue to show depression on long-term follow-up.

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