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Almalt, A., S. Attia, and H. A. Khalil, "Investigating The Evolution Of Informal Urban Pockets In Greater Cairo Region", Journal of Engineering Research, Faculty of Engineering in Mataria, Helwan University, vol. 154 (June 2017), pp. A15–A38, 2017. Abstract

The urban fabric of Greater Cairo comprises different urban patterns that coexist and grow simultaneously. These include but are not limited to; radial, gridiron, organic and more; all merged and intertwined in a unique way, making it hard to grasp all these different patterns on ground. Between these different patterns, formal planned areas and informal unplanned areas rises an urban component otherwise known as urban island/pocket, which are surrounded by a distinctive formal pattern. This paper aims to investigate the emergence and evolution of these urban islands within the social, economic and political influences that dominated the 20th century in Cairo. This investigation leads to an insightful understanding of the multilayered fabric of Cairo, unveiling some of its hidden layers, which evolved amidst urban formality and informality. Cases are a comparative analysis between the two types of informal urban pockets, which are; 1. Old City Core (Village/Ezbat); and 2. Small Spaces between old & new districts. This analysis is carried out through monitoring the formulation of one case study of each type, which exists in Mohandessin and Khedival Cairo respectively.

Almalt, A., S. Attia, and H. A. Khalil, "Developing Mixed Uses to Regenerate Urban pockets in Greater Cairo Region (GCR)", Journal of Engineering Research, Faculty of Engineering in Mataria, Helwan University, vol. 154 (June 2017), pp. A 39- A61, 2017. Abstract

There is no doubt that retail is one of the most important factors that affect economy in any country. Retailing is also one of the most important aspects in any urban strategy where inhabitants can easily reach and get their daily needs. Recently new urban approaches appeared as the key to solve many urban problems and regenerate the resources and potentials in the urban context in order to use it in a better way for the sake of the present and new generation. One of these approaches is the Retail-led Urban Regeneration, where retail is considered a key regenerating tool.
This paper discusses the retail-led urban regeneration approach in general and whether it is relevant to Greater Cairo Region. The paper also investigates whether inhabitants in Greater Cairo Region prefer to live in a mixed-use or in a residential neighborhoods. It also identifies the positive and negative aspects affecting the inhabitants due to the presence of mixed-uses- specifically retail-in their neighborhoods. Other related issues to 'Retail-led Urban regeneration' are also discussed. A field survey is conducted with inhabitants in three mixed-use districts representing different typologies in order to reach recommendations for proposing the best use to be allocated while upgrading urban deteriorated pockets in GCR.

Attia, S., Z. Shafik, A. El Halafawy, and H. A. Khalil, "Urban Regeneration of Public Space - Al-Alfi Street - Downtown Cairo", International Journal of Sustainable Development and Planning, WIT., vol. 12, issue 4, pp. 808-818, 2017. AbstractWebsite

Urban regeneration has been an accepted strategy for reviving city centers around the globe in Western Developed settings and in developing cities for decades. In Cairo, post January 25th Revolution, the Egyptian government sought an approach to upgrade several sites in downtown classical Cairo, to set new conditions for use of public space, to redistribute the power of authority and re-define the rules for the claim of public space of the city. The Cairo Governorate officially launched many projects within the same period; mainly focusing on refurbishing squares and streets, facades face lifting, controlling vendors’ trespassing and regulating car parking space among other regulations within Downtown area. However, having accepted and acknowledged the governmental intentions of the regeneration projects a question poses itself as to ‘How the community perceives and cherishes those initiatives?’ More important questions are raised regarding the regeneration of Al Alfi Street, the case study that addresses the governmental attempt in down town Cairo in 2015. It brings to light the dynamics enacted between different stakeholders. A research is conducted by adopting participant observations, surveys, questionnaires, and interviews with the local community and different stakeholders to understand their perception and appreciation to the ‘2015’ urban regeneration attempt. The findings of the paper set the urban regeneration principles in a discussion aiming at assessing the stakeholders’ involvement versus their goals and measuring their satisfaction with the outcome of the project, while still posing the question of the meaning of urban regeneration to the local community and to alternative scenarios that could yield more successful outcomes.