Khalil, H. A., and D. El-Sherif, "Needs Assessment on Land Governance in Egypt", Land Tenure Systems in North Africa, A Scoping Study, Addis Ababa, SLGA, GIZ, 2022.
Gad, H., S. Attia, and H. A. Khalil, "Rereading Cairo through Neighbouring Patterns Between Formal and Informal Areas, Case Study: Ard Al-Lewaa and ElMohandeseen", Ecocity World Summit 2021, Rotterdam, Netherland, 21 Feb, 2022.
Farouk, S., S. Attia, and H. A. Khalil, "Evaluation of Open Spaces in Relocated Communities Using Affordance Theory Case Study: Al-Asmarat Community", IOP proceedings, 14th International conference on civil and architecture engineering (ICCAE), Cairo, Egypt, 2022.
Kloss, P., and H. A. Khalil, "Greenery Measures to Mitigate Urban Heat Island Effect in the Greater Cairo Unplanned Areas: Imbaba, Giza, Egypt", Remapping Urban Heat Island Atlases in Regenerative Cities: IGI Global, 2022.
Kafrawy, M., S. Attia, and H. Khalil, "The Impact of Transit-Oriented Development on Fast-Urbanizing Cities: Applied analytical study on Greater Cairo Region", Journal of Contemporary Urban Affairs, vol. 6, issue 1, pp. 83-95, 2022. Abstract

Transportation has always been the backbone of development. Transit-oriented development (TOD) has been theorized, piloted and expanded increasingly in the past few decades. In this regard, this paper investigates the relationship between urban development, the transportation process, and the required implementation guidelines within fast-urbanizing cities, such as Cairo. After reviewing different related sustainable development theories, the study investigates pioneering case studies that have applied TOD and provided adequate implementation frameworks. The authors then extract and compare a set of required policies. The current Egyptian development paradigm is then discussed in relation to these enabling policies, focusing on Greater Cairo Region, Egypt. The authors debate previous development plans, progress, and newly proposed ones, focusing on the transportation process as the means for development. The study concludes with a set of required guidelines to ensure the integration of transportation with land-use planning, thus ensuring a more prosperous and inclusive urban development.

Eissa, Y., and H. Khalil, "Urban Climate Change Governance within Centralised Governments: A Case Study of Giza, Egypt", Urban Forum, 2021. Abstract

Urban climate governance on the subnational and local government levels requires multilevel governance and local autonomy. Within centralised governments, climate action becomes challenging. Moreover, in developing countries, development needs are usually prioritised, while climate action is viewed as an unaffordable luxury. In a centralised, middle-income country like Egypt, climate action is a challenge for all government levels. This research investigates the current state and the prospect of urban climate change governance on the subnational level in Egypt. A twofold methodology is used. First, through desk research, a comprehensive list of urban climate governance enabling factors was extracted. The list was used to assess the practices of 3 international case studies (Delhi, Durban, and Amman) and then refined and used to assess the first subnational level climate change strategy in Egypt. Second, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a few selected experts working on climate change and urban policies in Egypt. Two sets of recommendations were formulated to expedite urban climate change governance in Egypt, especially on the subnational and local levels. While the research focuses on Egypt, the methodology and recommendations could be adopted and adapted by local governments functioning within centralised systems.

Nicolopoulou, K., A. M. Salama, S. Attia, C. Samy, D. Horgan, H. A. E. E. Khalil, and A. Bakhaty, "Re-enterprising the unplanned urban areas of Greater Cairo- a social innovation perspective", Open House Internationa, vol. 46, issue 2, pp. 189-212, 2021. Abstract

Purpose
This study aims to develop an innovative and comprehensive framework to address water-related challenges faced by communities located in urban settlements in the area of Greater Cairo. It is commonly accepted that such global challenges that border issues of resilience, community development, social equity and inclusive growth, call for a collaboration of disciplines. Such collaboration allows for the identification of synergies in ways that can enlighten and enrich the space of potential solutions and create pathways towards robust solutions.
Design/methodology/approach
The research process has been participatory, and it involved, apart from site interviews, engagement via a photographic exhibition, during an outreach and engagement event, of the researched sites in one of the academic institutions of the authors. A total of 12 women were interviewed and the expert’s workshop was attended by 12 experts.
Findings
Social innovation can promote agile processes to prototyping services, involving multiple sectors and stakeholders through open ecosystems. For urban settlements undergoing rapid expansion, social innovation can help communities and governments to build resilience in the face of resource gaps – often making use of advancements in technology and improvements from other disciplines (Horgan and Dimitrijevic, 2019). For the unplanned urban areas around Greater Cairo, input from different knowledge areas can offer valuable contributions; in terms of the project and the study that we report on in this paper, the contributing areas included architecture and urban planning, as well as women-led entrepreneurship targeting economic growth, social and community impacts.
Originality/value
In this paper, we demonstrate the significance of a transdisciplinary framework based on social innovation, for the study of women-led entrepreneurship as a response to water-based challenges within an urban settlement. The creation of such a framework can be a significant contribution to conceptualise, examine and respond to “wicked challenges” of urban sustainability. This paper also believes that the readership of the journal will be subsequently benefitting from another way to conceptualise the interplay of theoretical perspectives at the level of organisations and the individual to support the inquiry into such challenges.

Abdel-Moneim, N. M., H. A. E. Khalil, and R. R. Kamel, "Developing QOL Index for Resettlement Projects of Unsafe Areas in Egypt", Urban Forum, vol. 32, issue 3, pp. 349-371, 2021. Abstract

Both public authorities and mid-high income groups, in many instances, tend to see urban informality as an illness that should be treated and/or eliminated. However, urban informality provides several attributes that contribute to the livelihood of many communities and surrounding residents. Urban informality possesses potentials that would facilitate both formalization and integration of such areas within the city, considering that it is currently the most prominent urbanization method. Consequently, unsafe areas’ upgrading and resettlement projects should not be limited to providing housing, clean water, or enhanced sanitation. They should extend to make fair use of the existing inherent potentials to improve livability for both slum dwellers and surrounding areas. Aiming to enhance the dwellers’ quality of life (QOL), upgrading projects should ensure the actual implementation of economic, social, institutional, and urban programs. This would entail the cooperation between various stakeholders to achieve inclusive development, create a sense of community, and attract local small and medium investments. This paper aims to develop a QOL Index tailored for unsafe areas’ upgrading/resettlement projects. Based on the literature review of various existing indices and case study analysis, the paper develops a set of criteria to define relevant urban, social, economic, and institutional indicators to assure QOL for unsafe areas’ dwellers and guide new resettlement projects with a focus on the Egyptian context.

Khalil, H., "Enhancing Livability through Resource Efficiency: An Urban Metabolism Study in Cairo", The Materials Book, Berlin, Ruby Press, 2020.
Khalil, H. A. E. E., and A. Al-Ahwal, "Reunderstanding Cairo through urban metabolism: Formal versus informal districts resource flow performance in fast urbanizing cities", Journal of Industrial Ecology, vol. 25, pp. 176–192, 2021.
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