The impact of l-arginine supplementation on the enteral phase of experimental infection in treated and untreated mice.

Citation:
Fadl, H. O., N. M. Amin, H. Wanas, S. Saad El-Din, H. A. Ibrahim, B. E. Aboulhoda, and N. Z. Bocktor, "The impact of l-arginine supplementation on the enteral phase of experimental infection in treated and untreated mice.", Journal of parasitic diseases : official organ of the Indian Society for Parasitology, vol. 44, issue 4, pp. 737-747, 2020.

Abstract:

The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the immunopathological response during () infection remains controversial. The amino acid, l-arginine is a NO precursor commonly used by athletes and bodybuilders as a protein supplement. As to our knowledge, there are no published studies which have tested the effect of l-arginine on the intestinal phase of experimental trichinellosis. The present work aims to investigate the effect of l-arginine on the enteral phase of experimental infection in albendazole-treated and untreated mice. Forty BALB/C mice infected orally with larvae were divided into 4 groups as follows: Group A were infected and untreated (control) mice, Group B received albendazole alone, Group C received l-arginine alone, and Group D received both l-arginine and albendazole. Compared to the control group, l-arginine supplementation showed; a significant increase in the intestinal adult worm burden, a significantly high inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression, elevated immune markers; tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and enhanced apoptosis. Albendazole treated-group had a significant reduction in the adult worm number (90.9%), while combined albendazole-arginine regimen showed a lower percentage of worm reduction (72.7%). During the enteral phase of infection, l-arginine supplementation should be taken cautiously, as it may modulate the proinflammatory immune response and subsequently affect the outcome of the infection and/or treatment.