Pulse Oximetry in Comparison to Arterial Blood Oxygen Saturation in Respiratory Distress in Neonates

Citation:
Doss, S. S. W., D. S. Mosallam, E. A. A. Abdallah, and M. M. M. Moro, "Pulse Oximetry in Comparison to Arterial Blood Oxygen Saturation in Respiratory Distress in Neonates", Alexandria Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 25, issue 2, pp. 77-81, 2011.

Abstract:

Monitoring oxygen saturation is important to the newborns receiving supplemental oxygen so to
decrease the incidence of exposure to hyperoxemia and the risk of potential deleterious effects of radical
oxygen species. Pulse oximetry is a non invasive, medical device that indirectly measures the oxygen
saturation of a patient's blood. An arterial blood gas (ABG) is a blood test that is performed using blood
from an artery. ABG testing is used to determine the pH of the blood, the partial pressure of carbon
dioxide and oxygen(PaO2), and the bicarbonate level.: This study aimed at studying the relationship of
PaO2 and pulse oxygen saturation values in newborn with respiratory distress to evaluate whether pulse
oxygen saturation value can reflect significant changes in PaO2. Prospective comparison of PaO2 and
pulse oxygen saturation values in 80 patients (mean gestational age 35 ± 3.6 weeks) was performed. The
PaO2 measurements were obtained from blood gas analyzer; simultaneous pulse oxygen saturation
values were recorded. We evaluated PaO2/ pulse oxygen saturation values in the 80 neonates. Of the 80
samples, 30 (37.5 %) of cases were breathing supplemental oxygen by CPAP, 27 (33.7 %) of cases were
on nasal prong, 21 (26.3 %) were on ventilator and 2 (2.5 %) were on head box. A mean pulse oxygen
saturation of (93.7 ± 7.1%) and a mean PaO2 of (34.9 ± 10) mmHg was observed. There was a statistically
significant positive (direct) correlation between PO2 and SpO2. An increase in PO2 is associated with an
increase in SpO2 (p<0.001). In conclusion: pulse oximetry measured from neonates and infants with
respiratory distress has statistically significant positive (direct) correlation with PO2.