Occurrence of cagA vacA s1a m1 i1 Helicobacter pylori in farm animals in Egypt and ability to survive in experimentally contaminated UHT milk.

Citation:
Elhariri, M., D. Hamza, R. Elhelw, and E. Hamza, "Occurrence of cagA vacA s1a m1 i1 Helicobacter pylori in farm animals in Egypt and ability to survive in experimentally contaminated UHT milk.", Scientific reports, vol. 8, issue 1, pp. 14260, 2018 Sep 24.

Abstract:

Cases of human gastric cancer due to Helicobacter pylori have been reported worldwide and animals might act as a reservoir of infection in certain circumstances. The recent few decades showed a rapid decline in the incidence of gastric cancer, which was mainly due to the decrease in H. pylori infection. The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of H. pylori among livestock and investigate whether the animal isolates can be transmitted through contaminated milk causing gastric infection. Feces and milk samples were collected from apparently healthy cows, buffaloes, and sheep, and were examined by nested PCR and genotyping. The PCR positive samples were further subjected to bacterial culture followed by partial 16s sequencing of the isolates. Twenty-nine percent of the animals showed the presence of H. pylori, mainly the virulent cagAvacAs1a m1 i1 genotype, which is known to be associated with serious diseases in humans. The spiral viable culturable form (SVCF) of this strain was inoculated into UHT (ultra-high temperature) milk and remained viable for up to 10 days at 4 °C. Increasing period of storage and or temperature led to a decrease in the number of the SVCF and occurrence of the coccoid viable non-culturable form (CVNCF). The infectivity of the survived forms was determined by feeding healthy groups of laboratory mice with the contaminated UHT milk containing SVCF or CVNCF for 40 days. The gastric mucosa of the two mice groups showed similar levels of H. pylori load. This highlights that H. pylori can persist in contaminated milk by entering a non-culturable state, which can induce gastric infection.

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