Non-myeloablative bone marrow transplant and platelet infusion can transiently improve the clinical outcome of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy: a case report.

Citation:
Hussein, E., "Non-myeloablative bone marrow transplant and platelet infusion can transiently improve the clinical outcome of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy: a case report.", Transfusion and apheresis science : official journal of the World Apheresis Association : official journal of the European Society for Haemapheresis, vol. 49, issue 2, pp. 208-11, 2013 Oct.

Abstract:

Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) is caused by deficiency in thymidine phosphorylase (TP), that regulates thymidine (dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd). Toxic levels of dThd and dUrd can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction by impairing mitochondrial DNA replication, causing GI and neurologic deterioration. We studied the impact of bone marrow transplant (BMT) and platelets, as a source of TP on the clinical outcome of MNGIE. We report a case of MNGIE, who presented with severe vomiting. Over time, he was non-ambulatory and his GI symptoms got progressively worse with severe dysphagia, abdominal pain episodes, persistent vomiting and diarrhea. Being unfit for intense conditioning regimen, he received a mini BMT, with mild conditioning regimen. Bone marrow was obtained from his HLA fully matched brother. One month after transplantation, donor chimerism in peripheral blood was 33%. Excellent clinical responses were achieved 3 months after transplantation and circulating donor cell chimerism decreased to 24% with a significant increase in platelet TP activity. Ten months post transplant the patient's symptoms recurred and fresh single donor platelets were infused, with a significant increase in platelet TP activity. Mini BMT and platelet transfusion can transiently increase circulating TP activity and might prevent progress of this fatal disease.

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