Psychoendocrinology: arginine vasopressin and resilience in patients with major depressive disorder.

Citation:
Abdel Mawella, S. M., Hussein H. A., Zyada F., Abdelaal A., Ayoub D. R., & Naguy A. (2021).  Psychoendocrinology: arginine vasopressin and resilience in patients with major depressive disorder.. CNS spectrums.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: There is a burgeoning body of evidence suggesting that arginine vasopressin (AVP) acts as a neuromodulator of the stress response. AVP stimulates the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone, synergistic to corticotropin-releasing hormone, which might explain AVP's role in resilience. Personal hardiness is the bedrock of resilience. Numerous studies have demonstrated elevated plasma levels of AVP in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), suggesting an etiopathogenetic role as well as a novel therapeutic target.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between AVP and resilience in patients with MDD and to determine AVP levels in serum of patients with MDD.

METHODS: Forty patients with MDD and 40 healthy control subjects were studied using the Dispositional Resilience (Hardiness) Scale by Barton, the Quality of Life Scale, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Biochemical analysis of plasma levels of AVP, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was performed for all participants.

RESULTS: Levels of AVP were statistically significantly elevated in patients with MDD compared with healthy controls. Psychological hardiness was decreased in patients with MDD compared with healthy controls, a finding also statistically significant. There was a negative correlation between plasma AVP level and psychological hardiness.

CONCLUSION: AVP and psychological hardiness are negatively correlated, reflecting lower stress resilience. AVP levels are indeed higher in patients struggling with MDD.