Effect of National Early Warning Scoring System Implementation on Cardiopulmonary Arrest, Unplanned ICU Admission, Emergency Surgery, and Acute Kidney Injury in an Emergency Hospital, Egypt.

Citation:
Badr, M. N., N. S. Khalil, and A. M. Mukhtar, "Effect of National Early Warning Scoring System Implementation on Cardiopulmonary Arrest, Unplanned ICU Admission, Emergency Surgery, and Acute Kidney Injury in an Emergency Hospital, Egypt.", Journal of multidisciplinary healthcare, vol. 14, pp. 1431-1442, 2021.

Abstract:

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of national early warning scoring system (NEWS) implementation in identifying patients at risk of clinical deterioration at an emergency hospital.

BACKGROUND: Early warning score has been developed to facilitate early detection of deterioration by categorizing a patients' severity of illness and prompting nursing staff to request a medical review at specific trigger points.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective, control/intervention groups', quasi-experimental design was utilized. A sample of 364 adult patients were admitted to the inpatient unit at an emergency hospital for six months. The patients were divided into a study group (174 patients) and a control group (190 patients). All study patients were followed up to either death or hospital discharge before and after implementing a new observation chart. The patients' outcomes were compared and analyzed between both groups.

RESULTS: In the intervention period, compared to the control period, a significant reduction was seen in the number of cardiopulmonary arrest (4.7% vs 1.1%, p = 0.046), unplanned ICU admission (5.3% vs 1.7%, p = 0.049), emergency surgery (6.3% vs 0%, p = 0.001), acute kidney injury (6.8% vs 1.1%, p = 0.006). As well, there was a significant increase in the number of patients receiving medical reviews following clinical deterioration in terms of escalation plan (3.2% vs 26.4%, p = <0.001).

CONCLUSION: The implementation of NEWS was associated with a significant improvement in patients' outcomes in hospital wards, increases in the frequency of vital signs measurements, and an increase in the number of medical reviews following clinical instability.

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