Tumor behavior of hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatitis C treatment by direct-acting antivirals: comparative analysis with non-direct-acting antivirals-treated patients.

Citation:
Abdelaziz, A. O., M. M. Nabil, A. H. Abdelmaksoud, H. I. Shousha, M. B. Hashem, E. M. Hassan, A. Salah, D. A. Omran, and T. M. Elbaz, "Tumor behavior of hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatitis C treatment by direct-acting antivirals: comparative analysis with non-direct-acting antivirals-treated patients.", European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology, vol. 31, issue 1, pp. 75-79, 2019.

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: Scarce reports have commented on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) behavior after direct-acting antivirals (DAAs).

AIM: To analyze differences in tumor behavior between patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced HCC and were either treated or not using DAAs.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: This case-control study includes patients with HCV-related HCC who received generic DAAs (group I) and all non-DAA treated patients with HCC who presented to our clinic during the same period (group II). Patient and tumor characteristics, treatment types and outcome were compared between the two groups.

RESULTS: Group I included 89 patients and group II included 207 patients. No significant difference was detected between groups regarding HCC number or size. Group I showed a more infiltrative HCC pattern, whereas group II had more circumscribed and delineated lesions. The incidence of portal vein thrombosis and significant lymphadenopathy was significantly higher in group I (P=0.03 and 0.03, respectively). Serum levels of α-fetoprotein were significantly higher in group I (P=0.02). These factors significantly affected the response to HCC management (P=0.03). Incidence of complete responses were 47.2 and 49.8% for groups I and II, respectively, whereas incomplete responses were 12.4 and 25.1%, respectively. Supportive treatment was applied to 40.4% in group I and 25.1% in group II.

CONCLUSION: HCC behavior was more aggressive in DAA-treated patients regarding portal vein thrombosis, malignant lymphadenopathy, and HCC imaging characteristics, which affected the chance of ablation and the treatment response.