Assessment of serum zinc, serum, and tissue zinc α2-glycoprotein levels in vitiligo: a pilot study

Citation:
Azzam, O. A., M. H. Sherbeiny, O. G. Shaker, and S. B. Mahmoud, Assessment of serum zinc, serum, and tissue zinc α2-glycoprotein levels in vitiligo: a pilot study, , vol. 17, pp. 91, 2020/01/01.

Abstract:

Background Vitiligo is an acquired idiopathic depigmentary skin disease with partial or complete loss of melanocytes. Zinc is an essential micronutrient for humans. Zinc α2-glycoprotein (ZAG) is a recently identified adipokine. Both zinc and ZAG may have a role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo.Objective To assess the serum levels of zinc, serum, and tissue levels of ZAG in vitiligo patients in comparison to controls, in order to evaluate their possible role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo.
Patients and methods This pilot case–control study included 20 vitiligo patients and 20 age-matched and sex-matched healthy individuals serving as a control group. Blood samples and skin biopsies were taken from all participants for the evaluation of serum zinc, serum, and tissue ZAG levels.
Results Serum zinc and serum ZAG were lower in patients than in controls but with no statistically significant difference (P=0.18 and 0.552, respectively), while tissue ZAG was significantly lower in patients than in controls (P=0.046). Serum zinc was significantly lower in female controls than in male controls (P=0.009). A statistically significant negative correlation (r=−0.602, P=0.005) was detected between the duration of disease and serum zinc level in patients. No statistically significant correlations were detected between serum zinc and either serum or tissue ZAG in patients or controls.
Conclusion This study suggests a possible role for deficiency of zinc and ZAG in the pathogenesis of vitiligo, through documenting lower, although nonsignificant, serum zinc levels, as well as significantly lower tissue ZAG levels in vitiligo patients than controls.

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