The Relative contribution of receptive and expressive language skills in Predicting Social interaction among children with autism spectrum disorder

Citation:
Ayman, Salim, A. H., "The Relative contribution of receptive and expressive language skills in Predicting Social interaction among children with autism spectrum disorder", مجلة کلية التربية . جامعة طنطا,, vol. 88, issue (4), pp. 1011-1088, 2022.

Abstract:

Abstract:
Deficiencies in language and social interaction skills are key symptoms in diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. Current research aims to determine the predictability of social interaction skills through receptive and expressive language skills among children with autism spectrum disorder and to reveal their relationship as well as differences in the light of gender, age and IQ. The research sample consisted of (90) children. The descriptive curriculum was used, the receptive and expressive language skills scale and the social interaction skills scale were used. The results indicated that the level of receptive language was high, while expressive language and the overall degree of language skills were medium, social exchange and social relations skills were medium, while non-verbal communication skills were high. A statistically significant correlation between children's grades at some levels of receptive language with some social interaction skills, and no statistically significant correlation between expressive language levels and social interaction skills except the pragmatic level. The statistical impact of some levels of receptive language on their ability to predict social interaction skills, while only the pragmatic level of expressive language levels is predicted by some social interaction skills. and The absence of statistically significant differences between males and females in receptive and expressive language skills, as well as in social interaction skills. There are statistically significant differences in older age in receptive and expressive language skills, as opposed to no differences in social interaction skills. Statistically significant differences exist in favour of the high IQ in receptive and expressive language skills, as well as social interaction skills except for social relations skills. This result supports research into the interrelationships between language and social interaction at larger ages, and recommends further research into the intermediate variables between language skills and social interaction.
Keywords: autism spectrum disorder - receptive language - expressive language - social interaction.

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