Salivary markers and coronavirus disease 2019: insights from cross-talk between the oral microbiome and pulmonary and systemic low-grade inflammation and implications for vascular complications.

Citation:
AbdelMassih, A., A. A. Hassan, A. S. Abou-Zeid, A. Hassan, E. Hussein, M. Gadalla, M. Hussein, M. A. Eid, M. Elahmady, N. El Nahhas, et al., "Salivary markers and coronavirus disease 2019: insights from cross-talk between the oral microbiome and pulmonary and systemic low-grade inflammation and implications for vascular complications.", Cardiovascular endocrinology & metabolism, vol. 10, issue 3, pp. 162-167, 2021.

Abstract:

To date, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has affected over 6.2 million individuals worldwide, including 1.46 million deaths. COVID-19 complications are mainly induced by low-grade inflammation-causing vascular degeneration. There is an increasing body of evidence that suggests that oral dysbiotic taxa are associated with worse prognosis in COVID-19 patients, especially the Prevotella genus, which was retrieved from nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage samples in affected patients. Oral dysbiosis may act by increasing the likelihood of vascular complications through low-grade inflammation, as well as impairing respiratory mucosal barrier mechanisms against SARS-CoV-2. Salivary markers can be used to reflect this oral dysbiosis and its subsequent damaging effects on and the lungs and vasculature. Salivary sampling can be self-collected, and is less costly and less invasive, and thus may be a superior option to serum markers in risk stratification of COVID-19 patients. Prospective studies are needed to confirm such hypothesis. Video Abstract: http://links.lww.com/CAEN/A28.