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Helmy, M. A., A. Hasanin, L. Magdy Milad, M. Mostafa, and S. Fathy, "Parasternal intercostal muscle thickening as a predictor of non-invasive ventilation failure in patients with COVID-19.", Anaesthesia, critical care & pain medicine, vol. 41, issue 3, pp. 101063, 2022.
Helmy, M. A., L. M. Milad, A. M. Hasanin, M. Mostafa, A. H. Mannaa, M. M. Youssef, M. Abdelaziz, R. Alkonaiesy, M. M. Elshal, and Osama Hosny, "Parasternal intercostal thickening at hospital admission: a promising indicator for mechanical ventilation risk in subjects with severe COVID-19.", Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, vol. 37, issue 5, pp. 1287-1293, 2023. Abstract

We aimed to evaluate the ability of parasternal intercostal thickening fraction (PIC TF) to predict the need for mechanical ventilation, and survival in subjects with severe Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). This prospective observational study included adult subjects with severe COVID-19. The following data were collected within 12 h of admission: PIC TF, respiratory rate oxygenation index, [Formula: see text] ratio, chest CT, and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score. The ability of PIC TF to predict the need for ventilatory support (primary outcome) and a composite of invasive mechanical ventilation and/or 30-days mortality were performed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) analysis. Multivariate analysis was done to identify the independent predictors for the outcomes. Fifty subjects were available for the final evaluation. The AUC (95% confidence interval [CI]) for the right and left PIC TF ability to predict the need for ventilator support was 0.94 (0.83-0.99), 0.94 (0.84-0.99), respectively, with a cut off value of > 8.3% and positive predictive value of 90-100%. The AUC for the right and left PIC TF to predict invasive mechanical ventilation and/or 30 days mortality was 0.95 (0.85-0.99) and 0.90 (0.78-0.97), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, only the PIC TF was found to independently predict invasive mechanical ventilation and/or 30-days mortality. In subjects with severe COVID-19, PIC TF of 8.3% can predict the need to ventilatory support with a positive predictive value of 90-100%. PIC TF is an independent risk factor for the need for invasive mechanical ventilation and/or 30-days mortality.

Mostafa, M., M. A. Helmy, L. Magdy Milad, and A. Hasanin, "Patient self-induced lung injury risk in severe COVID-19.", Anaesthesia, critical care & pain medicine, vol. 41, issue 2, pp. 101018, 2022.
Lefrant, J. - Y., R. Pirracchio, D. Benhamou, M. - O. Fischer, R. Njeim, B. Allaouchiche, S. Bastide, M. Biais, L. Bouvet, O. Brissaud, et al., "Peace, not war in Ukraine or anywhere else, please.", Anaesthesia, critical care & pain medicine, vol. 41, issue 3, pp. 101068, 2022.
Hasanin, A., A. Mukhtar, and H. Nassar, "Perfusion indices revisited", Journal of Intensive Care, vol. 5, pp. 24, 2017.
Hasanin, A., and Y. Hassabelnaby, "Perioperative non-invasive haemodynamic optimisation: Is photoplethysmography really useless?", Anaesthesia Critical care & Pain Medicine, vol. 39, pp. 625, 2020.
ahmed lotfy, A. Hasanin, M. Rashad, M. Mostafa, D. Saad, M. Mahmoud, W. Hamimy, and A. Z. Fouad, "Peripheral perfusion index as a predictor of failed weaning from mechanical ventilation.", Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, vol. 35, issue 2, pp. 405-412, 2021. Abstract

We hypothesized that impairment of peripheral perfusion index (PPI) during spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) might be predictive of weaning failure. We included 44 consecutive, adult, patients, who were scheduled for weaning after at least 48 h of invasive mechanical ventilation in this prospective observational study. Weaning failure was defined as failed SBT or reintubation within 48 h of extubation. PPI readings were obtained before initiation of the SBT, and every 5 min till the end of the SBT. PPI ratio was calculated at every time point as: PPI value/ baseline PPI. The primary outcome was the accuracy of PPI ratio at the end of the SBT in detecting failed weaning. Forty-three patients were available for the final analysis. Eighteen patients (42%) were considered failed weaning. PPI ratio was higher in patients with successful weaning compared to patients with failed weaning during the last 15 min of the SBT. PPI ratio at the end of SBT was higher in patients with successful weaning compared to patients with failed weaning. PPI ratio at the end of SBT had good predictive ability for weaning failure {area under receiver operating characteristic curve (95% confidence interval): 0.833(0.688-0.929), cutoff value ≤ 1.41}. The change in PPI during SBT is an independent predictor for re-intubation. PPI could be a useful tool for monitoring the patient response to SBT. Patients with successful weaning showed higher augmentation of PPI during the SBT compared to re-intubated patients. Failure of augmenting the PPI by 41% at the end of SBT could predict re-intubation with negative predictive value of 95%. Clinical trial identifier: NCT03974568. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03974568?term=ahmed+hasanin&draw=3&rank=17.

Hasanin, A., and M. Abdulatif, "Phenylephrine and norepinephrine for the management of spinal-induced hypotension in preeclamptic patients: Hypothesis-study design mismatch.", European journal of anaesthesiology, vol. 39, issue 3, pp. 291-292, 2022.
Elshal, M. M., A. M. Hasanin, M. Mostafa, and R. M. Gamal, "Plethysmographic Peripheral Perfusion Index: Could It Be a New Vital Sign?", Frontiers in medicine, vol. 8, pp. 651909, 2021. Abstract

The plethysmographic peripheral perfusion index (PPI) is a very useful parameter with various emerging utilities in medical practice. The PPI represents the ratio between pulsatile and non-pulsatile portions in peripheral circulation and is mainly affected by two main determinants: cardiac output and balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. The PPI decreases in cases of sympathetic predominance and/or low cardiac output states; therefore, it is a useful predictor of patient outcomes in critical care units. The PPI could be a surrogate for cardiac output in tests for fluid responsiveness, as an objective measure of pain especially in un-cooperative patients, and as a predictor of successful weaning from mechanical ventilation. The PPI is simple to measure, easy to interpret, and has continuously displayed variables, making it a convenient parameter for detecting the adequacy of blood flow and sympathetic-parasympathetic balance.

Abdelnasser, A., B. Abdelhamid, A. Elsonbaty, A. Hasanin, and A. Rady, "Predicting successful supraclavicular brachial plexus block using pulse oximeter perfusion index.", British journal of anaesthesia, vol. 119, issue 2, pp. 276-280, 2017 Aug 01. Abstract

Background: Supraclavicular nerve block is a popular approach for anaesthesia for upper limb surgeries. Conventional methods for evaluation of block success are time consuming and need patient cooperation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the perfusion index (PI) can be used to predict and provide a cut-off value for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular nerve block success.

Methods: The study included 77 patients undergoing elective orthopaedic procedures under ultrasound-guided supraclavicular nerve block. After local anaesthetic injection, sensory block success was assessed every 3 min by pinprick, and motor block success was assessed every 5 min by the ability to flex the elbow and the hand against resistance. The PI was recorded at baseline and at 10, 20, and 30 min after anaesthetic injection in both blocked and non-blocked limbs. The PI ratio was calculated as the PI after 10 min divided by the PI at the baseline. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for the accuracy of the PI in detection of block success.

Results: The PI was higher in the blocked limb at all time points, and this was paralleled by a higher PI ratio compared with the unblocked limb. Both the PI and the PI ratio at 10 min after injection showed a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for block success at cut-off values of 3.3 and 1.4, respectively.

Conclusions: The PI is a useful tool for evaluation of successful supraclavicular nerve block. A PI ratio of > 1.4 is a good predictor for block success.

Hasanin, A. M., A. M. Mokhtar, S. M. Amin, and A. A. Sayed, "Preprocedural ultrasound examination versus manual palpation for thoracic epidural catheter insertion.", Saudi journal of anaesthesia, vol. 11, issue 1, pp. 62-66, 2017 Jan-Mar. Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Ultrasound imaging before neuraxial blocks was reported to improve the ease of insertion and minimize the traumatic trials. However, the data about the use of ultrasound in thoracic epidural block are scanty. In this study, pre-insertion ultrasound scanning was compared to traditional manual palpation technique for insertion of the thoracic epidural catheter in abdominal operations.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty-eight patients scheduled to midline laparotomy under combined general anesthesia with thoracic epidural analgesia were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups with regard to technique of epidural catheter insertion; ultrasound group (done ultrasound screening to determine the needle insertion point, angle of insertion, and depth of epidural space) and manual palpation group (used the traditional manual palpation technique). Number of puncture attempts, number of puncture levels, and number of needle redirection attempts were reported. Time of catheter insertion and complications were also reported in both groups.

RESULTS: Ultrasound group showed lower number of puncture attempts (1 [1, 1.25] vs. 1.5 [1, 2.75],= 0.008), puncture levels (1 (1, 1) vs. 1 [1, 2],= 0.002), and needle redirection attempts (0 [0, 2.25] vs. 3.5 [2, 5],= 0.00). Ultrasound-guided group showed shorter time for catheter insertion compared to manual palpation group (140 ± 24 s vs. 213 ± 71 s= 0.00).

CONCLUSION: Preprocedural ultrasound imaging increased the incidence of first pass success in thoracic epidural catheter insertion and reduced the catheter insertion time compared to manual palpation method.

Ahmed Hasanin, Akram Eladawy, H. M. Y. S. I. A. L. H. M. D. G. A. M., "Prevalence of extensively drug-resistant gram negative bacilli in surgical intensive care in Egypt", Pan African Medical Journal, vol. 19, pp. 177, 2014.
Hasanin, A., N. Sherif, M. Elbarbary, and D. Mansor, "Providing medical care in unfamiliar settings; experience of an Egyptian campaign in Uganda", Pan African Medical Journal, vol. 17, pp. 111, 2014.
Hasanin, A., T. Zanata, S. Osman, Y. Abdelwahab, R. Samer, M. Mahmoud, M. Elsherbiny, K. Elshafaei, F. Morsy, and A. Omran, "Pulse Pressure Variation-Guided Fluid Therapy during Supratentorial Brain Tumour Excision: A Randomized Controlled Trial.", Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 7, issue 15, pp. 2474-2479, 2019.