Ketamine-based Versus Fentanyl-based Regimen for Rapid-sequence Endotracheal Intubation in Patients with Septic Shock: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

Citation:
Ali, H., B. M. A. Elhamid, A. M. Hasanin, A. Abou Amer, and A. Rady, "Ketamine-based Versus Fentanyl-based Regimen for Rapid-sequence Endotracheal Intubation in Patients with Septic Shock: A Randomised Controlled Trial.", Romanian journal of anaesthesia and intensive care, vol. 28, issue 2, pp. 98-104, 2021.

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work is to compared ketamine-based versus fentanyl-based regimens for endotracheal intubation in patients with septic shock undergoing emergency surgery.

DESIGN: This was a randomised double-blinded controlled trial.

PARTICIPANTS: Patients with septic shock on norepinephrine infusion scheduled for emergency surgery.

SETTING AND INTERVENTIONS: At induction of anaesthesia, patients were allocated into ketamine group (n=23) in which the participants received ketamine 1 mg/kg, and fentanyl group (n=19) in which the participants received fentanyl 2.5 mcg/ kg. Both groups received midazolam (0.05 mg/kg) and succinyl choline (1 mg/kg).

MEASUREMENT: The primary outcome was mean arterial blood pressure. The secondary outcomes included: heart rate, cardiac output, and incidence of postintubation hypotension defined as mean arterial pressure ≤80% of baseline value.

RESULTS: Forty-two patients were available for final analysis. The mean blood pressure was higher in the ketamine group than in the fentanyl group at 1, 2 and 5 minutes after the induction of anaesthesia. Furthermore, the incidence of postinduction hypotension was lower in the ketamine group than in the fentanyl group (11 [47.8%] versus 16 [84.2%], P-value= 0.014). Other hypodynamic parameters, namely the heart rate and cardiac output, were comparable between both groups; and were generally maintained in relation to the baseline reading in each group.

CONCLUSION: The ketamine-based regimen provided better hemodynamic profile compared to fentanyl-based regimen for rapid-sequence intubation in patients with septic shock undergoing emergency surgery.

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