Comparison of two Norepinephrine rescue bolus for Management of Post-spinal Hypotension during Cesarean Delivery: a randomized controlled trial.

Citation:
Hassabelnaby, Y. S., A. M. Hasanin, N. Adly, M. M. A. Mostafa, S. Refaat, E. fouad, M. Elsonbaty, H. A. Hussein, M. Mahmoud, Y. M. Abdelwahab, et al., "Comparison of two Norepinephrine rescue bolus for Management of Post-spinal Hypotension during Cesarean Delivery: a randomized controlled trial.", BMC anesthesiology, vol. 20, issue 1, pp. 84, 2020.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Data on the best norepinephrine bolus dose for management of hypotension are limited. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of two norepinephrine bolus doses in the rescue management of maternal hypotension during cesarean delivery.

METHODS: This randomized, controlled trial included mothers scheduled for cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia with a prophylactic norepinephrine infusion. Following spinal anaesthesia administration, a participant was considered hypotensive if systolic blood pressure was ≤80% compared to the baseline reading. Participants were allocated to receive either 6 mcg or 10 mcg norepinephrine bolus for the management of hypotensive episodes. The hemodynamic response after administration of norepinephrine bolus was recorded. The episode was considered successfully managed if systolic blood pressure returned to within 80% from the baseline reading within 2 min after norepinephrine bolus administration, and did not drop again within 6 min after the norepinephrine bolus. The primary outcome was the incidence of successful management of the first hypotensive episode. Other outcomes included systolic blood pressure, heart rate, incidence of maternal bradycardia, and reactive hypertension.

RESULTS: One hundred and ten mothers developed hypotensive episodes and received norepinephrine boluses for management. The number of successfully managed first hypotensive episodes was 50/57 (88%) in the 6 mcg-treated episodes and 45/53 (85%) in the 10 mcg-treated episodes (p = 0.78). Systolic blood pressure was comparable after administration of either bolus dose. Heart rate was lower after administration of 10 mcg bolus compared to 6 mcg bolus, without significant bradycardia requiring atropine administration. The incidence of reactive hypertension was comparable between both groups.

CONCLUSION: In mothers undergoing elective cesarean delivery under prophylactic norepinephrine infusion at 0.05 mcg/kg/min, there was no advantage to the use of 10 mcg norepinephrine bolus over 6 mcg norepinephrine bolus for the rescue management of first hypotensive episode. Neither of the 2 bolus doses reached a 100% success rate. The incidences of bradycardia and reactive hypertension were comparable between both norepinephrine doses.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: At clinicaltrial.gov registry system on January 4, 2019 Clinical trial identifier: NCT03792906.