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2019
hanan mostafa, M. Shaban, A. Hasanin, H. Mohamed, S. Fathy, H. M. Abdelreheem, ahmed lotfy, and A. Abougabal, "Evaluation of peripheral perfusion index and heart rate variability as early predictors for intradialytic hypotension in critically ill patients.", BMC Anesthesiology, vol. 19, issue 1, pp. 242, 2019.
Hasanin, A., K. H. Mourad, I. Farouk, S. Refaat, A. Nabih, S. A. E. Raouf, and H. Ezzat, "The Impact of Goal-Directed Fluid Therapy in Prolonged Major Abdominal Surgery on Extravascular Lung Water and Oxygenation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.", Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 7, issue 8, pp. 1276-1281, 2019.
Mohamed, H., S. M. Abbas, and A. Hasanin, "Management of post laryngectomy tracheobronchial tear with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass", Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, vol. 55, pp. 128-129, 2019.
Hasanin, A., S. Amin, N. Agiza, M. Hassan, and S. Refaat, "Norepinephrine Infusion for Preventing Postspinal Anesthesia Hypotension during Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Dose-finding Trial.", Anesthesiology, vol. 130, issue 1, pp. 55-62, 2019.
Hasanin, A., S. Amin, S. Refaat, S. Habib, M. Zayed, and Y. Abdelwahab, "Norepinephrine Versus Phenylephrine Infusion for Prophylaxis Against Post-Spinal Anaesthesia Hypotension During Elective Caesarean Delivery: A Randomised Controlled Trial", Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine, vol. 38, issue 6, pp. 601-607, 2019.
Hasanin, A., T. Zanata, S. Osman, Y. Abdelwahab, R. Samer, M. Mahmoud, M. Elsherbiny, K. Elshafaei, F. Morsy, and A. Omran, "Pulse Pressure Variation-Guided Fluid Therapy during Supratentorial Brain Tumour Excision: A Randomized Controlled Trial.", Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 7, issue 15, pp. 2474-2479, 2019.
Hammad, Y., A. Hasanin, A. Elsakka, A. Refaie, D. Abdelfattah, and S. A. El Rahman, "Thoracic Fluid Content: A Novel Parameter for Detection of Pulmonary Edema in Parturients With Preeclampsia", Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, vol. 33, issue 4, pp. 413-418, 2019.
Hasanin, A., S. Habib, Y. Abdelwahab, M. Elsayad, M. Mostafa, and M. Zayed, "Variable Versus Fixed-Rate Infusion of Phenylephrine During Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial", BMC Anesthesiology, vol. 19, issue 1, pp. 197, 2019.
2020
Elhamid, B. A., mohamed emam, M. Mostafa, A. Hasanin, W. Awada, A. Rady, and H. Omar, "The ability of perfusion index to detect segmental ulnar nerve sparing after supraclavicular nerve block.", Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, vol. 34, issue 6, pp. 1185-1191, 2020. Abstract

Supraclavicular nerve block (SCB) is a commonly used regional block for upper extremity surgery. The most common form of failure of SCB is ulnar segmental sparing. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of perfusion index (PI) in early detection of segmental sparing of the ulnar component of SCB. A prospective observational study included adult patients scheduled for surgery under ultrasound-guided SCB. PI was simultaneously measured at the index finger and little finger. PI was recorded every minute for the first 10 min after SCB. PI ratio was calculated at every measurement point as PI/baseline PI. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve was calculated for the ability of PI ratio to detect segmental ulnar sparing with comparison of little finger readings to the index finger readings. Forty-nine patients were available for the final analysis. Nine patients (18%) had segmental ulnar sparing. PI ratio at the little finger showed excellent predictive ability for ulnar sparing starting from the fifth minute (AUROC 0.92 [0.8-0.98], cutoff value ≤ 1.71) and reached the highest value at the seventh minute (AUROC 0.96 [0.86-1], cutoff value ≤ 1.35), whereas PI ratio at the index finger showed poor predictive ability. When using the PI for evaluation of successful SCB, segmental ulnar sparing could be accurately detected when the PI was measured at the little finger and not at the index finger. An increase of 71% in PI at the little finger 5 min after SCB could accurately rule out ulnar sparing.Clinical trial identifier NCT03880201. Clinical trial registration https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03880201?term=NCT03880201&draw=2&rank=1 .

Mostafa, M. M. A., A. M. Hasanin, F. Alhamade, B. A. Elhamid, A. G. Safina, S. M. Kasem, Osama Hosny, M. Mahmoud, E. fouad, A. Rady, et al., "Accuracy and trending of non-invasive oscillometric blood pressure monitoring at the wrist in obese patients.", Anaesthesia, critical care & pain medicine, vol. 39, issue 2, pp. 221-227, 2020. Abstract

BACKGROUND: In obese patients, non-invasive blood pressure monitoring in the arm is difficult due to the arm size and morphology. We compared the non-invasive oscillometric wrist blood pressure measurement with the arm and forearm in obese patients monitored with invasive radial blood pressure (reference standard).

METHODS: This prospective observational study included adult obese patients scheduled for bariatric surgery. Non-invasive blood pressure was measured at the arm, upper forearm and wrist of one upper extremity, while invasive blood pressure was simultaneously measured through a radial arterial catheter in the contralateral upper extremity. The accuracy of non-invasive blood pressure reading at each site was evaluated for absolute and trending values using the Bland-Altman analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficient.

RESULTS: In 40 patients, 262, 259, and 263 pairs of non-invasive blood pressure readings were obtained from the arm, forearm, and wrist sites, respectively. As primary outcome, the correlation coefficient for systolic blood pressure was higher for the wrist (0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.9-0.94]) than for the arm (0.74, 95% CI [0.68-0.79]) and the forearm (0.71, 95% CI [0.64-0.76]) (P<0.05). The non-invasive systolic wrist blood pressure showed the least mean bias and the narrowest limits of agreement (-0.3±7.6mmHg) when compared with forearm (4.3±16) and arm measurements (14.2±13.6) (P<0.05). For trending values, the correlation coefficient was the highest at the wrist.

CONCLUSION: In obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, non-invasive blood pressure measured at the wrist showed the highest accuracy in comparison with the arm and forearm.

Mostafa, M., M. Saeed, A. Hasanin, S. Badawy, and D. KHALED, "Accuracy of thyromental height test for predicting difficult intubation in elderly.", Journal of anesthesia, vol. 34, issue 2, pp. 217-223, 2020. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Studies of the accuracy of different airway tests are lacking in elderly. We evaluated and compared the accuracy of thyromental height in predicting difficult intubation in relation to the other traditional airway tests in elderly.

METHODS: We included 120 patients aged ≥ 65 years scheduled for general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. Thyromental height, modified Mallampati test, thyromental distance and sternomental distance were evaluated. Cormack-Lehane grade > 2 was considered difficult laryngoscopy. Difficult tracheal intubation was considered if successful intubation required more than 2 attempts. The accuracy of different tests in predicting difficult intubation and difficult laryngoscopy were evaluated through area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify risk factors for difficult intubation and difficult laryngoscopy.

RESULTS: Our cohort had a mean age of 71(7) years. We encountered difficult laryngoscopy in 15/120 (12%) patients, difficult intubation in 20/120 (17%) patients, and failed laryngoscopy requiring alternative methods for securing the airway in 3/120 (3%) patients. For predicting difficult intubation, thyromental height and modified Mallampati test showed the highest accuracy AUROC (95% confidence interval): 0.9 (0.83-0.95), cut-off value ≤ 5.9 cm, and AUROC (95% confidence interval): 0.89 (0.82-0.94), cut-off value > 2, respectively. Low thyromental height and high modified Mallampati test were the only independent risk factors for difficult laryngoscopy and difficult intubation.

CONCLUSION: In elderly scheduled for elective procedure, both thyromental height and modified Mallampati tests showed good accuracy in predicting difficult intubation and difficult laryngoscopy, whilst thyromental distance and sternomental distance were poor predictors.

Hassabelnaby, Y. S., A. M. Hasanin, N. Adly, M. M. A. Mostafa, S. Refaat, E. fouad, M. Elsonbaty, H. A. Hussein, M. Mahmoud, Y. M. Abdelwahab, et al., "Comparison of two Norepinephrine rescue bolus for Management of Post-spinal Hypotension during Cesarean Delivery: a randomized controlled trial.", BMC anesthesiology, vol. 20, issue 1, pp. 84, 2020. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Data on the best norepinephrine bolus dose for management of hypotension are limited. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of two norepinephrine bolus doses in the rescue management of maternal hypotension during cesarean delivery.

METHODS: This randomized, controlled trial included mothers scheduled for cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia with a prophylactic norepinephrine infusion. Following spinal anaesthesia administration, a participant was considered hypotensive if systolic blood pressure was ≤80% compared to the baseline reading. Participants were allocated to receive either 6 mcg or 10 mcg norepinephrine bolus for the management of hypotensive episodes. The hemodynamic response after administration of norepinephrine bolus was recorded. The episode was considered successfully managed if systolic blood pressure returned to within 80% from the baseline reading within 2 min after norepinephrine bolus administration, and did not drop again within 6 min after the norepinephrine bolus. The primary outcome was the incidence of successful management of the first hypotensive episode. Other outcomes included systolic blood pressure, heart rate, incidence of maternal bradycardia, and reactive hypertension.

RESULTS: One hundred and ten mothers developed hypotensive episodes and received norepinephrine boluses for management. The number of successfully managed first hypotensive episodes was 50/57 (88%) in the 6 mcg-treated episodes and 45/53 (85%) in the 10 mcg-treated episodes (p = 0.78). Systolic blood pressure was comparable after administration of either bolus dose. Heart rate was lower after administration of 10 mcg bolus compared to 6 mcg bolus, without significant bradycardia requiring atropine administration. The incidence of reactive hypertension was comparable between both groups.

CONCLUSION: In mothers undergoing elective cesarean delivery under prophylactic norepinephrine infusion at 0.05 mcg/kg/min, there was no advantage to the use of 10 mcg norepinephrine bolus over 6 mcg norepinephrine bolus for the rescue management of first hypotensive episode. Neither of the 2 bolus doses reached a 100% success rate. The incidences of bradycardia and reactive hypertension were comparable between both norepinephrine doses.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: At clinicaltrial.gov registry system on January 4, 2019 Clinical trial identifier: NCT03792906.

Zayed, M., H. Nassar, A. Hasanin, A. H. Saleh, P. Hassan, D. Saad, S. A. H. A. R. MAHMOUD, G. A. Bakr, E. fouad, N. Saleh, et al., "Effects of nitroglycerin versus labetalol on peripheral perfusion during deliberate hypotension for sinus endoscopic surgery: a randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial.", BMC anesthesiology, vol. 20, issue 1, pp. 85, 2020. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Deliberate hypotension is used to provide a bloodless field during functional endoscopic sinus surgery; however, the impact of controlled hypotension during anesthesia on peripheral tissue perfusion has not been extensively evaluated. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of nitroglycerin- versus labetalol-induced hypotension on peripheral perfusion.

METHODS: The present randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial included adult patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery. Patients were allocated to one of two groups according to the drug received for induction of deliberate hypotension: nitroglycerin (n = 20) or labetalol (n = 20). Mean arterial pressure was maintained at 55-65 mmHg in both groups. Both study groups were compared according to pulse oximeter-derived peripheral perfusion index (primary outcome), serum lactate level, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, surgical field score, and intraoperative blood loss.

RESULTS: Forty patients were included in the final analysis. The nitroglycerin group exhibited a higher peripheral perfusion index at nearly all records (p < 0.0001) and lower postoperative serum lactate levels (1.3 ± 0.2 mmol/L vs. 1.7 ± 0.4 mmol/L; p = 0.001) than the labetalol group. The peripheral perfusion index was higher in the nitroglycerin group than at baseline at most intraoperative readings. The median surgical field score was modestly lower in the labetalol group than in the nitroglycerin group in the first 20 min (2 [interquartile range (IQR) 2-2.5] versus 1.5 [IQR 1-2]; p = 0.001). Both groups demonstrated comparable and acceptable surgical field scores in all subsequent readings.

CONCLUSION: Nitroglycerin-induced deliberate hypotension was accompanied by higher peripheral perfusion index and lower serum lactate levels than labetalol-induced deliberate hypotension during sinus endoscopic surgery.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered at clinicaltrials registry system with trial number: NCT03809065. Registered at 19 January 2019. This study adheres to CONSORT guidelines.

Hasanin, A., and M. Mostafa, "Evaluation of fluid responsiveness during COVID-19 pandemic: what are the remaining choices?", Journal of anesthesia, vol. 34, pp. 758-764, 2020.
Kamel, M. M., A. Hasanin, B. Nawar, M. Mostafa, V. F. Jacob, H. Elhadi, W. Alsadek, and S. A. Elmetwally, "Evaluation of noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring in children with congenital heart diseases.", Paediatric anaesthesia, vol. 30, issue 5, pp. 571-576, 2020. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Noninvasive measurement of blood hemoglobin could save time and decrease the risk of anemia and infection. The accuracy of CO-oximetry-derived noninvasive hemoglobin (Sp-Hb) had been evaluated in pediatric population; however, its accuracy in children with congenital heart disease has not been studied till date. We evaluated the accuracy of Sp-Hb in relation to laboratory-measured hemoglobin (Lab-Hb) in children with congenital heart disease.

METHODS: This prospective observational study included children with congenital heart disease undergoing procedural intervention. Sp-Hb measurements were obtained using Radical-7 Masimo pulse CO-oximeter and were compared against simultaneous Lab-Hb measurements obtained from the arterial line. Children were divided in cyanotic and acyanotic, and separate analysis was performed for each group. The values of both measurements were analyzed using Spearman's correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis. Correlation was performed between Sp-Hb and Lab-Hb bias and each of arterial oxygen saturation and perfusion index.

RESULTS: One-hundred and eleven pairs of readings were obtained from 65 children. The median (quartiles) age and weight of the children were 1 (1.2-4) years and 11 (8-17) kg, respectively. There was moderate correlation between Lab-Hb and Sp-Hb with a correlation coefficient (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 0.75 (0.63-0.83) in acyanotic children and 0.62 (0.37-0.79) in cyanotic children. The mean bias (95% limits of agreements) was -0.4 g/dL (-2.4 to 1.6 g/dL) and 1 g/dL (-2.7 to 4.6 g/dL) in acyanotic and cyanotic children, respectively. The mean bias between Sp-Hb and Lab-Hb showed a weak negative correlation with oxygen saturation (r [95% CI]): (-0.36 [-0.51--0.18]), and a weak positive correlation with the perfusion index (r [95% CI]): (0.19 [0.01-0.37]).

CONCLUSION: The large bias and the wide limits of agreement between Sp-Hb and Lab-Hb denote that Masimo-derived Sp-Hb is not accurate in children with congenital heart disease especially in the cyanotic group; the error in Sp-Hb increases when oxygen saturation decreases.

Hasanin, A., H. Tarek, M. M. A. Mostafa, A. Arafa, A. G. Safina, M. H. Elsherbiny, Osama Hosny, A. A. Gado, T. Almenesey, G. A. Hamden, et al., "Modified-ramped position: a new position for intubation of obese females: a randomized controlled pilot study.", BMC anesthesiology, vol. 20, issue 1, pp. 151, 2020. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Endotracheal intubation requires optimum position of the head and neck. In obese females, the usual ramped position might not provide adequate intubating conditions. We hypothesized that a new position, termed modified-ramped position, during induction of anesthesia would facilitate endotracheal intubation through bringing the breasts away from the laryngoscope and would also improve the laryngeal visualization.

METHODS: Sixty obese female patients scheduled for general anesthesia were randomly assigned into either ramped or modified-ramped position during induction of anesthesia. In the ramped position (n = 30), the patient head and shoulders were elevated to achieve alignment of the sternal notch and the external auditory meatus; while in the modified-ramped position (n = 30), the patient shoulders were elevated using a special pillow, and the head was extended to the most possible range. Our primary outcome was the incidence of failed laryngoscopic insertion in the oral cavity (the need for patient repositioning). Other outcomes included time till vocal cord visualization, time till successful endotracheal intubation, difficulty of the mask ventilation, and Cormack-Lehane grade for laryngeal view.

RESULTS: Fourteen patients (47%) in ramped group required repositioning to facilitate introduction of the laryngoscope in the oral cavity in comparison to one patient (3%) in the modified-ramped position (p < 0.001). Modified-ramped position showed lower incidence of difficult mask ventilation, shorter time for glottic visualization, and shorter time for endotracheal tube insertion compared to the ramped position. The Cormack-Lehane grade was better in the modified-ramped position.

CONCLUSION: Modified-ramped position provided better intubating conditions, improved the laryngeal view, and eliminated the need for repositioning of obese female patients during insertion of the laryngoscope compared to ramped position.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: Identifier: NCT03640442. Date: August 2018.

Mukhtar, A., ahmed lotfy, A. Hasanin, I. El-Hefnawy, and A. El-adawy, "Outcome of non-invasive ventilation in COVID-19 critically ill patients: A Retrospective observational Study", Anaesthesia Critical care & Pain Medicine, vol. 39, pp. 579-580, 2020.
Hasanin, A., and Y. Hassabelnaby, "Perioperative non-invasive haemodynamic optimisation: Is photoplethysmography really useless?", Anaesthesia Critical care & Pain Medicine, vol. 39, pp. 625, 2020.
Hasanin, A., and M. Mostafa, "A reply to a letter", Journal of anesthesia, vol. 34, pp. 631, 2020.
Elmetwally, S. A., A. Hasanin, L. Sobh, M. Gohary, K. Sarhan, and D. Ghazy, "Semi-sitting position enhances gastric emptying of clear fluids in children: A randomized controlled trial", Egyptian Journal of Anaesthesia, vol. 36, pp. 170-175, 2020.
Fathy, S., A. Hasanin, M. Raafat, M. Mostafa, A. fetouh, M. E. Sayed, E. M. Badr, H. M. Kamal, and A. Z. Fouad, "Thoracic fluid content: a novel parameter for predicting failed weaning from mechanical ventilation", Journal of intensive care, vol. 8, pp. 20, 2020.
Hasanin, A., A. Aboelela, M. Mostafa, R. M. Mansour, and A. Kareem, "The Use of Topical Nitroglycerin to Facilitate Radial Arterial Catheter Insertion in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.", Journal of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesia, vol. 34, issue 12, pp. 3354-3360, 2020. Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the use of topical nitroglycerin patch increases radial artery diameter and facilitate cannulation in children.

DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.

SETTING: Cairo University Hospital.

PARTICIPANTS: Children aged 2 to 8 years old scheduled for cardiac surgery.

INTERVENTION: In the nitroglycerin group (n = 20), a gauze-covered, half-sized nitroglycerin patch (5 mg) was applied at the site of radial pulsation 1 hour before induction of anesthesia. In the control group (n = 20), a gauze pad was applied to the bare skin at the site of radial pulsation with no intervention.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The primary outcome was the diameter of the radial artery in both limbs using ultrasonography. Other outcomes included the degree of arterial palpability, number of arterial punctures, and incidence of successful first puncture cannulation. The radial artery diameter increased after 30 minutes and 60 minutes compared with the baseline value in the nitroglycerin group in both limbs, whereas no change was reported in the radial artery diameter in the control group. The nitroglycerin group showed a greater incidence of successful first cannulation trial, a fewer number of trials, and a shorter cannulation time compared with the control group. There were no significant hypotensive episodes in any patient.

CONCLUSION: Local application of a half-sized, 5 mg nitroglycerin patch for 60 minutes in children increased the radial artery diameter bilaterally, increased the rate of first trial success, and decreased the time needed for arterial cannulation without significant hypotensive episodes.

2021
Hasanin, A., N. Karam, A. H. M. E. D. M. MUKHTAR, and S. F. Habib, "The ability of pulse oximetry-derived peripheral perfusion index to detect fluid responsiveness in patients with septic shock.", Journal of anesthesia, vol. 35, issue 2, pp. 254-261, 2021. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Fluid challenge test is a widely used method for the detection of fluid responsiveness in acute circulatory failure. However, detection of the patient's response to the fluid challenge requires monitoring of cardiac output which is not feasible in many settings. We investigated whether the changes in the pulse oximetry-derived peripheral perfusion index (PPI), as a non-invasive surrogate of cardiac output, can detect fluid responsiveness using the fluid challenge test or not.

METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 58 patients with septic shock on norepinephrine infusion. Fluid challenge test, using 200 mL crystalloid solution, was performed in all study subjects. All patients received an additional 300 mL crystalloid infusion to confirm fluid responsiveness. Velocity time integral (VTI) (using transthoracic echocardiography), and PPI were measured at the baseline, after 200 mL fluid challenge, and after completion of 500 mL crystalloids. Fluid responsiveness was defined by 10% increase in the VTI after completion of the 500 mL. The predictive ability of ∆PPI [Calculated as (PPI after 200 mL - baseline PPI)/baseline PPI] to detect fluid responders was obtained using the receiver operating characteristic curve.

RESULTS: Forty-two patients (74%) were fluid responders; in whom, the mean arterial pressure, the central venous pressure, the VTI, and the PPI increased after fluid administration compared to the baseline values. ∆PPI showed moderate ability to detect fluid responders [area under receiver operating characteristic curve (95% confidence interval) 0.82 (0.70-0.91), sensitivity 76%, specificity 80%, positive predictive value 92%, negative predictive value 54%, cutoff value ≥ 5%]. There was a significant correlation between ∆PPI and ∆VTI induced by the fluid challenge.

CONCLUSION: ∆PPI showed moderate ability to detect fluid responsiveness in patients with septic shock on norepinephrine infusion. Increased PPI after 200 mL crystalloid challenge can detect fluid responsiveness with a positive predictive value of 92%; however, failure of the PPI to increase does not exclude fluid responsiveness.

CLINICAL TRIAL IDENTIFIER: NCT03805321. Date of registration: 15 January 2019. Clinical trial registration URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03805321?term=ahmed+hasanin&amp;rank=9 .

Refaat, S., M. Mostafa, A. Hasanin, N. Rujubali, R. Fouad, and Y. Hassabelnaby, "Accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure measured at the ankle during cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia.", Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, vol. 35, issue 5, pp. 1211-1218, 2021. Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of oscillometric noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) measured at the ankle in detecting low arm NIBP during cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. In this prospective observational study, a cohort of full-term mothers undergoing elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia was examined. Simultaneous NIBP measurements were obtained from the arm and the ankle. The primary outcome was the accuracy of the ankle NIBP in detecting arm systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 90 mmHg. Other outcomes included the accuracy of ankle NIBP in detecting SBP < 80% of the baseline value. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to evaluate the accuracy of ankle NIBP in detecting low arm NIBP. The Bland-Altman analysis was conducted to evaluate the agreement between values. We analyzed 1729 pairs of readings obtained from 97 mothers. Ankle SBP showed good accuracy in detecting SBP < 90 mmHg, with an AUC (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 0.90 (0.89-0.91) and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99 (98-99%) at a cutoff value of ≤ 103 mmHg. Furthermore, ankle SBP showed good accuracy in detecting SBP < 80% of the baseline value, with an AUC (95% CI) of 0.84 (0.82-0.89) and an NPV of 95 (93-96%) at a cutoff value of ≤ 76% of the ankle baseline SBP. The mean bias between the two sites of measurement was - 5.4 ± 15.5, - 2.0 ± 11, and 0.5 ± 12.1 mmHg for SBP, diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure, respectively. In conclusion, ankle NIBP measurement is not interchangeable with arm NIBP measurement. However, ankle NIBP measurement showed good accuracy for ruling out low arm NIBP during a cesarean delivery.Clinical trial rejistration: NCT04199156.

Mostafa, M., A. M. Hasanin, O. S. Elsayed, M. M. Mostafa, and K. Sarhan, "Accuracy of oscillometric blood pressure measurement at both arms in the lateral position.", Blood pressure monitoring, vol. 26, issue 5, pp. 364-372, 2021. Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) measurement at the dependent- and nondependent arms in the lateral position, using invasive blood pressure (IBP) as reference.

METHODS: This prospective observational study included 42 adult patients undergoing surgery in the lateral position. Paired readings of IBP and NIBP were obtained at either arm. The accuracy of both arms in detecting mean arterial pressure (MAP) <70 mmHg was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The agreement between the IBP and NIBP was evaluated using the Bland-Altman and error grid analyses.

RESULTS: We analyzed 350 and 347 paired readings at the dependent- and nondependent arms. The AUC for detecting hypotension was comparable in both arms. The negative and positive predictive values (95% confidence interval) were 100% (99-100%) and 24% (14-34%), respectively for the dependent arm at cutoff value MAP ≤86 mmHg; and were 99% (96-100%) and 21% (13-30%), respectively for the nondependent arm at cutoff value MAP ≤75 mmHg. The mean bias for MAP was -6.0 ± 9.1 and 6.3 ± 10.1 mmHg; and for systolic blood pressure was 0.3 ± 11.6 and 13.2 ± 12.6 mmHg, in the dependent- and nondependent arm, respectively. Error grid analysis showed that the proportions of paired MAP readings in risk zone A were 71 and 82% in the dependent- and the nondependent arms, respectively.

CONCLUSION: In the lateral position, the NIBP readings at both arms are not interchangeable with the corresponding IBP readings. However, NIBP measurement at both arms can be used to accurately rule out hypotension.

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