Fas/Fas Ligand pathways gene polymorphisms in pediatric renal allograft rejection.

Citation:
Fadel, F. I., M. F. Elshamaa, A. Salah, M. Nabhan, M. Rasheed, S. Kamel, D. Kandil, and E. H. Thabet, "Fas/Fas Ligand pathways gene polymorphisms in pediatric renal allograft rejection.", Transplant immunology, vol. 37, pp. 28-34, 2016.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: An essential milestone in pediatric transplantation is to find noninvasive biomarkers to monitor acute rejection (AR). In this retrospective (Case-control) study, we examined the role of Fas -670A/G and Fas Ligand (FasL) -843C/T gene polymorphisms in allograft nephropathy in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

METHODS: In 47 pediatric kidney transplant recipients and 20 healthy controls, Fas -670A/G and FasL -843C/T gene polymorphisms as well as serum soluble Fas Ligand level (sFasL) were measured.

RESULTS: Serum sFasL levels were significantly higher in transplant recipients children than that in controls (548.25±298.64pg/ml vs 143.17±44.55pg/ml, p=0.0001). There was no significant difference between patients with AR and those without AR in regards to serum sFasL levels (567.70±279.87pg/ml vs 507.85±342.80pg/ml, p=0.56). Fas -670A/G genotypes or alleles were not significantly different between controls and transplant recipients and among transplant recipients with and without AR. (P>0.05 for all). FasL -843C/T genotypes were not different between transplant recipients and controls and among transplant recipients with and without AR (P>0.05 for all). However, Frequency of C allele in transplant patients was significantly higher than that in the control group (44.68% vs 25%, P=0.03). FasL -843C/T alleles were significantly different between patients with and without AR (P=0.03). The percentages of C allele were higher in children with AR (58.82% vs 36.67%). We found that serum FasL and serum creatinine were variables that were independently associated with AR.

CONCLUSION: This study suggests that FasL gene polymorphisms in peripheral blood might be accurate in detecting cellular AR.

Tourism