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2021
Nagy, M., A. Kholeif, A. R. M. Mansour, S. Abdelhameed, Y. A. Radwan, A. Khedr, A. S. Elhalawany, A. Samir, I. Sarhan, and A. B. Zein, "Comparison between Malerba osteotomy and combined Evans/medial displacement calcaneal osteotomies for the management of flexible pes planus in young adults: a prospective randomised control trial, three years follow-up.", International orthopaedics, 2021. Abstract

PURPOSE: The aim of the current study is to evaluate the functional and radiological outcomes of Malerba osteotomy in comparison to the standardized combined Evans/Medial Displacement Calcaneal Osteotomy (MDCO) in the management of symptomatic flexible pes planus in young adults.

METHODS: Prospective randomized control trial included 34 feet (33 patients), 17 cases in each group. Functionally, patients were assessed by AOFAS and FADI scores. Radiographic evaluation included calcaneal pitch, lateral talo-1st metatarsal, AP talo-first metatarsal, AP talo-calcaneal angles, and the talar coverage percentage.

RESULTS: Pre-operative and three years follow-up scores and angles were compared between both groups. No statistically significant difference could be detected between both groups (P value 0.87). However, the data showed statistically significant difference in each group when comparing (pre-operative and third year follow-up scores and angles) (P value < 0.001). The mean union rate was eight weeks in Malerba group and nine weeks in Evans/MDCO group. No incidence of nonunion. Complications like calcaneocuboid subluxation, calcaneal anterior process fracture, and lateral column pain were exclusively reported in Evans/MDCO group.

CONCLUSION: Malerba osteotomy is a strong valid option for the operative management of flexible pes planus in young adults. Authors recommend Malerba osteotomy in all mild and moderate deformities due to lower complication rate while the combined Evans/MDCO is preferred in severe deformity due to relatively higher corrective power with consideration of possible complications.

Nagy, M., A. Kholeif, A. R. M. Mansour, S. Abdelhameed, Y. A. Radwan, A. Khedr, A. S. Elhalawany, A. Samir, I. Sarhan, and A. B. Zein, "Comparison between Malerba osteotomy and combined Evans/medial displacement calcaneal osteotomies for the management of flexible pes planus in young adults: a prospective randomised control trial, three years follow-up.", International orthopaedics, vol. 45, issue 10, pp. 2579-2588, 2021. Abstract

PURPOSE: The aim of the current study is to evaluate the functional and radiological outcomes of Malerba osteotomy in comparison to the standardized combined Evans/Medial Displacement Calcaneal Osteotomy (MDCO) in the management of symptomatic flexible pes planus in young adults.

METHODS: Prospective randomized control trial included 34 feet (33 patients), 17 cases in each group. Functionally, patients were assessed by AOFAS and FADI scores. Radiographic evaluation included calcaneal pitch, lateral talo-1st metatarsal, AP talo-first metatarsal, AP talo-calcaneal angles, and the talar coverage percentage.

RESULTS: Pre-operative and three years follow-up scores and angles were compared between both groups. No statistically significant difference could be detected between both groups (P value 0.87). However, the data showed statistically significant difference in each group when comparing (pre-operative and third year follow-up scores and angles) (P value < 0.001). The mean union rate was eight weeks in Malerba group and nine weeks in Evans/MDCO group. No incidence of nonunion. Complications like calcaneocuboid subluxation, calcaneal anterior process fracture, and lateral column pain were exclusively reported in Evans/MDCO group.

CONCLUSION: Malerba osteotomy is a strong valid option for the operative management of flexible pes planus in young adults. Authors recommend Malerba osteotomy in all mild and moderate deformities due to lower complication rate while the combined Evans/MDCO is preferred in severe deformity due to relatively higher corrective power with consideration of possible complications.

Sinha, P., A. Khedr, M. P. McClincy, T. S. Kenkre, N. E. Novak, and P. Bosch, "Epiphyseal Translation as a Predictor of Avascular Necrosis in Unstable Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.", Journal of pediatric orthopedics, vol. 41, issue 1, pp. 40-45, 2021. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physeal instability has been shown to be associated with a higher risk of avascular necrosis (AVN) in patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). The purpose of this study was to identify additional preoperative factors associated with AVN in patients with unstable SCFE.

METHODS: Basic demographic information, chronicity of symptoms, and estimated duration of nonambulatory status were noted. Preoperative radiographs were used to measure the Southwick slip angle, slip severity by Wilson criteria, and epiphyseal translation. Translation was measured by 3 distinct radiographic parameters in the position demonstrating maximal displacement. Postoperative radiographs at the time of most recent follow-up were assessed for the presence of AVN. Translation measurements were tested for inter-rater reliability. Patients who developed AVN were compared with those that did not by Fisher exact test and Wilcoxon tests. Logistic regression assessed the effect of translation on the odds of developing AVN. Receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted to assess any threshold effect.

RESULTS: Fifty-one patients (55 hips) out of 310 patients (16%) treated for SCFE were considered unstable. Seventeen hips' unstable SCFE (31%) showed radiographic evidence of AVN. Slip severity by Wilson grade (P=0.009) and epiphyseal translation by all measurements (P< 0.05) were statistically significantly greater among patients who developed AVN. Superior translation had the best inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.84). Average superior translation in hips that developed AVN was 17.2 mm compared with 12.9 mm in those that did not (P<0.02). Although the receiver operating characteristic curve did not demonstrate a threshold effect for AVN, it did effectively rule out AVN in cases with <1 cm of superior translation. Age, sex, laterality, chronicity of prodromal symptoms or inability to bear weight, Southwick slip angle, and method of treatment did not vary with the occurrence of AVN.

CONCLUSIONS: Epiphyseal translation, either by Wilson Grade or measured directly, is associated with AVN in patients with an unstable SCFE.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II-development of diagnostic criteria.

Sinha, P., A. Khedr, M. P. McClincy, T. S. Kenkre, N. E. Novak, and P. Bosch, "Epiphyseal Translation as a Predictor of Avascular Necrosis in Unstable Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.", Journal of pediatric orthopedics, vol. 41, issue 1, pp. 40-45, 2021. Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physeal instability has been shown to be associated with a higher risk of avascular necrosis (AVN) in patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). The purpose of this study was to identify additional preoperative factors associated with AVN in patients with unstable SCFE.

METHODS: Basic demographic information, chronicity of symptoms, and estimated duration of nonambulatory status were noted. Preoperative radiographs were used to measure the Southwick slip angle, slip severity by Wilson criteria, and epiphyseal translation. Translation was measured by 3 distinct radiographic parameters in the position demonstrating maximal displacement. Postoperative radiographs at the time of most recent follow-up were assessed for the presence of AVN. Translation measurements were tested for inter-rater reliability. Patients who developed AVN were compared with those that did not by Fisher exact test and Wilcoxon tests. Logistic regression assessed the effect of translation on the odds of developing AVN. Receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted to assess any threshold effect.

RESULTS: Fifty-one patients (55 hips) out of 310 patients (16%) treated for SCFE were considered unstable. Seventeen hips' unstable SCFE (31%) showed radiographic evidence of AVN. Slip severity by Wilson grade (P=0.009) and epiphyseal translation by all measurements (P< 0.05) were statistically significantly greater among patients who developed AVN. Superior translation had the best inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.84). Average superior translation in hips that developed AVN was 17.2 mm compared with 12.9 mm in those that did not (P<0.02). Although the receiver operating characteristic curve did not demonstrate a threshold effect for AVN, it did effectively rule out AVN in cases with <1 cm of superior translation. Age, sex, laterality, chronicity of prodromal symptoms or inability to bear weight, Southwick slip angle, and method of treatment did not vary with the occurrence of AVN.

CONCLUSIONS: Epiphyseal translation, either by Wilson Grade or measured directly, is associated with AVN in patients with an unstable SCFE.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II-development of diagnostic criteria.

Din, A. F. S. E., and A. Khedr, "Suprameniscal Portal for Repairing Meniscal Root Tears.", Arthroscopy techniques, vol. 10, issue 6, pp. e1627-e1632, 2021. Abstract

Several techniques and portals have been described for meniscal root repairs. Some authors describe using anterior portals for suture passing and manipulation of meniscal tissue, with some risk of iatrogenic chondral injuries reported. Other authors describe using posterior portals to avoid this risk. In this technique, we used a suprameniscal portal, which allowed a good trajectory for passing sutures in the meniscal tissue with minimal risk of iatrogenic chondral damage without the need to use posterior portals. The meniscal bed is first prepared. The suprameniscal portal is created in 15° of knee flexion and used to pass 2 sutures through the meniscus by a Lasso. The sutures are tied in a cinch configuration, shuttled through the tibial tunnel, and tied over a Dog Bone button.

Din, A. F. S. E., and A. Khedr, "Suprameniscal Portal for Repairing Meniscal Root Tears.", Arthroscopy techniques, vol. 10, issue 6, pp. e1627-e1632, 2021. Abstract

Several techniques and portals have been described for meniscal root repairs. Some authors describe using anterior portals for suture passing and manipulation of meniscal tissue, with some risk of iatrogenic chondral injuries reported. Other authors describe using posterior portals to avoid this risk. In this technique, we used a suprameniscal portal, which allowed a good trajectory for passing sutures in the meniscal tissue with minimal risk of iatrogenic chondral damage without the need to use posterior portals. The meniscal bed is first prepared. The suprameniscal portal is created in 15° of knee flexion and used to pass 2 sutures through the meniscus by a Lasso. The sutures are tied in a cinch configuration, shuttled through the tibial tunnel, and tied over a Dog Bone button.

2019
Diab, M. M., A. Khedr, L. Zaki, S. Khaled, and A. Balbaa, "Effect of introducing early weight bearing training in rehabilitating patient with tibial plateau fracture fixed with open reduction internal fixation", Bioscience Research, vol. 16, issue 2, pp. 1232-1242, 2019.
M, D. M., K. A, A. Z. L, and S. Ahmed Radwan Khaled, "Effect of introducing early weight bearing training in rehabilitating patient with tibial plateau fracture fixed with open reduction internal fixation.", Biosci Res., vol. 16, issue 2, pp. 1232-1242, 2019.
A, K., and M. S, "Proximal Metaphyseal and Diaphyseal Humerus Fractures.", Oper Tech Orthop., vol. 29, issue 1, pp. 2-10, 2019.
2017
Reda, W., and A. Khedr, "Stump Incorporation for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Step Towards a More Anatomical Reconstruction.", Arthroscopy techniques, vol. 6, issue 4, pp. e1303-e1307, 2017 Aug. Abstract

In most anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, the tear is at the femoral side leaving a robust stump attached to the tibia. Stump-preserving ACL reconstruction carries the advantage of rapid reinnervation and revascularization of the graft. In this technique, the femoral tunnel is created after exposing the femoral footprint. The ACL tibial stump is split and the tip of the ACL tibial guide is introduced through this split to reach the center of the tibial footprint. The tibial tunnel is then created and the ACL stump is bored to allow the passage of the graft. After the passage of the graft inside the stump and femoral and tibial fixation, 1 or 2 sutures are used to suture the graft to the stump by a suture passing device (Expressew II; Depuy Mitek, Raynham, MA). This technique, in addition to preservation of the mechanoreceptors and vascular channels for revascularization and reinnervation of the graft, allows preservation of the shape and surface area of the wide tibial origin of the ACL.

2016
Khedr, A., and S. A. Khaled, "Ischiopubic rami excision for obstructive dyspareunia in hyperparathyroidism.", Current Orthopaedic practice, vol. 27, issue 2, pp. E16-E19, 2016.
Reda, W., and A. Khedr, "Using a Posterolateral Portal to Pass and Tie the Suture of the Inferior Anchor During Arthroscopic Bankart Repair.", Arthroscopy techniques, vol. 5, issue 6, pp. e1467-e1470, 2016. Abstract

Using a posterolateral portal in passing and tying the inferior knot allows good labral reduction and adequate capsular shift to treat anterior shoulder instability. In this technique, the most inferior anchor is placed through a low anterolateral portal. A penetrating grasper is introduced from a posterolateral portal situated 2 to 3 cm distal and lateral to the viewing portal. This portal is used to pass the 2 limbs of the anchor suture as inferior as possible through the labrum and capsule close to 6 o'clock position to form the 2 limbs of the first mattress suture. Finally, knot tying is performed through this posterolateral portal, thus allowing better superior shift of the capsulolabral tissue. The other 2 anchor sutures are passed and tied through the low anterolateral portal.

2014
Abdelazeem, A., A. Khedr, M. Abousayed, A. Seifeldin, and S. Khaled, "Management of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures using the limited open sinus tarsi approach and fixation by screws only technique.", International orthopaedics, vol. 38, issue 3, pp. 601-6, 2014 Mar. Abstract

PURPOSE: Evaluation of management of the displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures (DIACF) Sanders types II and III by using minimally invasive sinus tarsi approach and fixation by screws only technique.

METHODS: Open reduction using the limited lateral approach and internal fixation using screws only was studied in 33 patients with unilateral isolated simple DIACF with a mean age of 35 years (15 type II patients and 18 type III patients). All patients were evaluated both clinically and radiologically.

RESULTS: With a mean follow-up period of 28.8 months (range 12-53 months), no cases of failure of reduction or displacement of hardware were detected. The mean AOFAS was 91.73 points while the mean MFS was 95.09 points. Twenty-eight patients were able to resume their pre-injury level of work while the remaining five refrained to sedentary jobs. The mean pre-operative Bohlers' angle was 2.8° (range from -38º to 24º) while postoperatively it was 19.4° (range 5º to 49º). There was no statistically significant difference when comparing the results (AOFAS p-value 1.00, MFS p-value 0.81) between Sanders' type II and III fractures. One patient had postoperative superficial wound infection. Seven patients complained of prominent screw heads. Complex regional pain syndrome occurred in seven patients and was treated successfully at six months duration.

CONCLUSION: The limited open sinus tarsi approach can be used successfully to treat displaced Sanders type II and III fractures. It allows for adequate visualization and reduction. Fixation by screws only is also sufficient. It also clearly avoids the major wound complication problems.