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Kheir, A. M. S., A. A. Alrajhi, A. M. Ghoneim, E. F. Ali, A. Magrashi, M. G. Zoghdan, S. A. M. Abdelkhalik, A. E. Fahmy, and A. Elnashar, "Modeling deficit irrigation-based evapotranspiration optimizes wheat yield and water productivity in arid regions", Agricultural Water Management, vol. 256, issue 1, pp. 107122, 2021. AbstractWebsite

Climate change and water scarcity have put food security and sustainable development in arid regions at risk. Irrigation based actual evapotranspiration (ETc) has recently been added as a new tool in the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) models and might improve irrigation water management, thus more research is needed. For this purpose, three Wheat models (CERES, CROPSIM and N-Wheat) in the latest version of DSSAT (v. 4.7.5) were calibrated and evaluated using experimental field data across three growing seasons. Field data included irrigation by different fractions of ETc as 80%, 100% and 120%. The calibrated models were then employed to predict wheat grain yield (GY), biomass yield (BY), irrigation, evapotranspiration, water use efficiency-based evapotranspiration (WUE_ET), and water use efficiency-based irrigation (WUE_Irri) for 10 locations represent Nile delta in long term simulation (1991–2020). The models showed robust simulations of ETc compared to observed values under all corresponding treatments, demonstrating high calibration accuracy and the ability to predict yield and water for other locations in the long term. Simulation treatments included automatic irrigation with different fractions of 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90% and 100% from ETc. Hereinafter, the simulated GY and WUE_ET were compared with those obtained by farmers in all locations to specify the recommended treatment achieving higher yield and water productivity. In all locations, simulated GY and BY ranged (4000–9000 kg ha-1), and (10,500–18,000 kg ha-1), respectively with associated uncertainty between treatments and locations. Averaged over ten locations, and 30 years, the simulated GY under full irrigation treatment (100% ETc), showed the superiority with an increase of 27.5%, 13.0%, 5.0%, 1.5%, and 0.4% relative to irrigation with 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90% ETc, respectively. Deficit irrigation-based ET decreased WUE_Irri, whilst increased WUE_ET, achieving the higher value (20.0 kg ha-1 mm-1) with irrigation based 90% ETc. However, deficit irrigation with 90% ETc (I5) produced higher WUE values than full irrigation (100% ETc), with increases of 0.08% and 10.6% for WUE_ET and WUE_irri, respectively. Comparing simulated GY and WUE_ET with farmers values in all locations, simulated values under irrigation based 90% ETc increased by 1.7% and 63%, respectively, confirming the importance of irrigation scheduling based 90% ETc in maximizing wheat yield and water productivity in arid regions.

Mumtaz, F., T. Yu, G. de Leeuw, L. Zhao, C. Fan, A. Elnashar, B. Bashir, G. Wang, and L. L. N. Li, "Modeling Spatio-temporal Land Transformation and Its Associated Impacts on land Surface Temperature (LST)", Remote Sensing, vol. 12, issue 18, pp. 2987, 2020. AbstractWebsite

Land use land cover (LULC) of city regions is strongly affected by urbanization and affects the thermal environment of urban centers by influencing the surface temperature of core city areas and their surroundings. These issues are addressed in the current study, which focuses on two provincial capitals in Pakistan, i.e., Lahore and Peshawar. Using Landsat data, LULC is determined with the aim to (a) examine the spatio-temporal changes in LULC over a period of 20 years from 1998 to 2018 using a CA-Markov model, (b) predict the future scenarios of LULC changes for the years 2023 and 2028, and (c) study the evolution of different LULC categories and investigate its impacts on land surface temperature (LST). The results for Peshawar city indicate the significant expansion in vegetation and built-up area replacing barren land. The vegetation cover and urban area of Peshawar have increased by 25.6%, and 16.3% respectively. In contrast, Lahore city urban land has expanded by 11.2% while vegetation cover decreased by (22.6%). These transitions between LULC classes also affect the LST in the study areas. Transformation of vegetation cover and water surface into built-up areas or barren land results in the increase in the LST. In contrast, the transformation of urban areas and barren land into vegetation cover or water results in the decrease in LST. The different LULC evolutions in Lahore and Peshawar clearly indicate their effects on the thermal environment, with an increasing LST trend in Lahore and a decrease in Peshawar. This study provides a baseline reference to urban planners and policymakers for informed decisions.

Mumtaz, F., Y. Tao, G. de Leeuw, L. Zhao, C. Fan, A. Elnashar, B. Bashir, G. Wang, L. L. Li, S. Naeem, et al., "Modeling Spatio-temporal Land Transformation and Its Associated Impacts on land Surface Temperature (LST)", Remote Sensing, vol. 13, issue 1, no. 18: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute, pp. 61, 2021. AbstractWebsite

Land use land cover (LULC) of city regions is strongly affected by urbanization and affects the thermal environment of urban centers by influencing the surface temperature of core city areas and their surroundings. These issues are addressed in the current study, which focuses on two provincial capitals in Pakistan, i.e., Lahore and Peshawar. Using Landsat data, LULC is determined with the aim to (a) examine the spatio-temporal changes in LULC over a period of 20 years from 1998 to 2018 using a CA-Markov model, (b) predict the future scenarios of LULC changes for the years 2023 and 2028, and (c) study the evolution of different LULC categories and investigate its impacts on land surface temperature (LST). The results for Peshawar city indicate the significant expansion in vegetation and built-up area replacing barren land. The vegetation cover and urban area of Peshawar have increased by 25.6%, and 16.3% respectively. In contrast, Lahore city urban land has expanded by 11.2% while vegetation cover decreased by (22.6%). These transitions between LULC classes also affect the LST in the study areas. Transformation of vegetation cover and water surface into built-up areas or barren land results in the increase in the LST. In contrast, the transformation of urban areas and barren land into vegetation cover or water results in the decrease in LST. The different LULC evolutions in Lahore and Peshawar clearly indicate their effects on the thermal environment, with an increasing LST trend in Lahore and a decrease in Peshawar. This study provides a baseline reference to urban planners and policymakers for informed decisions.

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